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Headlines Out Of Capitol’s JFK Album? • . MIDEM: 


Big Meet For Publishers 
Highest In ’66* 
BobMorganTo 


MGM, Atlantic Score 


December 31, 1966 



HeadMGMA&R 

British Govt. White Paper Adds Pop Program 

To BBC; Records Get 6 Hour Airing Each Day 

OMMY ROE: AFTER ‘SWEET PEA,' HITS COME FASTER 


Int’l Section 
Begins Pg. 45 





Where the soul-satisfying action is. 
On COLUMBIA RECORDS^ 


High-voltage singles 
getting intense 
\ radio play. 

\^^IVIy Ancestors’ 

\0brfiy Wilson """ 


That’s HowV 
Strong My\ 
Love Is” \ 

4-43857 A Sire Production 1 

Mattie Moultrie 


If 

i! 





Cash 





Cash Box 

Vol. XXVIll-Number 24 December 31, 1966 



(Publication Office) 


1780 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 10019 

(Phone: JUdson 6-2640) 
CABLE ADDRESS: CASHBOX, N. Y. 


JOE ORLECK Chairman of the Board 


GEORGE ALBERT 

President and Publisher 

NORMAN ORLECK 

Executive Vice President 

MARTY OSTROW 

Vice President 

LEON SCHUSTER 

Treasurer 


IRV LICHTMAN 

Editor in Chief 

EDITORIAL 

TOM McENTEE Associate Editor 
RICK BOLSOM 
ALLAN DALE 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
MIKE MARTUCCI 
JERRY ORLECK 

BERNIE BLAKE 

Director of Advertising 

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 
STAN SOIFER 
BILL STUPER 

HARVEY GELLER, Hollywood 


ED ADLUM 

General Manager 
COIN MACHINES & VENDING 

JOEL VANCE, Assistant 
LEE BROOKS, Chicago, III. 

LISSA MORROW, Hollywood 
ART DIRECTOR — WOODY HARDING 
CIRCULATION — THERESA TORTOSA, Manager 

CHICAGO 
LEE BROOKS 
29 E. Msdison St., 

Chicago 2. III. 

(Phenol Financial 0-7272) 


HOLLYWOOD 
HARVEY GELLER 

6290 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood 28, Cal. 
(Phone: Hollywood 6-2129) 


EUROPEAN DIRECTOR 
NEVILLE MARTEN 

ENGLAND 
NEVILLE MARTEN 
Dorris Land 
9a New Bond St. 
London, W1, Eng. 
Tol' Hyde Park 2868 


ITALY 

MARIOPANVINI ROSATI 
Oallorla Pasaarella 2 
Milan (Italy) 

Tell 790990 

GERMANY 
MAL SONDOCK 
Jetef Raps Strasse 1 
Munich, Germany 
Tel: 326410 

HOLLAND 
PAUL ACKET 
ThereslastFOtt 59-65 
The Hague 
Tel: 838500 
FRANCE 

CHRISTOPHE IZARD 
94, Rue Octavo Feulllet, 
Paris XVI Tell 870-9368 
BELGIUM 
FRANS ROMEYNS 
Paul Hymanslaan, 8, 
•ruaaela 18, Tel: 71.57.61 
SCANDINAVIA 
SVEN G. WINQUIST 
Kaggehelmavagen 49, 
•toekholm-Enakede, 
Sweden, Tel: 69-46 99 
SPAIN 

FEDERICO HALPERN 

Sagasta 23, 
Apartado 40^, 
Madrid 

Tell 257 0907—224 8600 


AUSTRALIA 
RON TUDOR 
8 Francis St., 
Heathmont, Victoria 
Tel: 87-6677 

ARGENTINA 
MIGUEL SMIRNOFF 
Rafaela 3978, 
Buenos Aires, 

Tel: 69-1S38 

BRAZIL 

LUIS DE M. C. GUEDES 
Rua Rego Freitas, 
289—3*. andar 
Sao Paulo, 8P 

MEXICO 

ENRIQUE ORTIZ 
Insurgentes Sur 1970 
Mexico 20, D. F., 
Tel: 24-68-67 

CANADA 
JOHN MURPHY 
87 North Hilt SL 
Port Arthur, Ontario 
Tel: (807) 344 3526 

JAPAN 

Adv. Mgr.: 
SHOICHI KUSANO 
Editorial Mgr.: 
MORIHIRO NAGATA 
466 Hlgashl-Olxuml 
N^rlmaku, 

Tokyo 


RATES 820 per year anywhere 1 
**»• U. 8. A, Published weekly. Second class posta( 
paid at Bristol, Conn. 06012. O.8.A. 

Copj^ght O 1966 by The Cash Box Publishing Cc 
Ino. ^ nghta reserved. -Copyright -under UnWers 
Cepyright Convention. 


LOOKING AHEAD 


1966, in show business parlance, 
will be a tough act to follow. The year, 
as covered in an editorial here two 
weeks ago, was good, great and fan- 
tastic for labels of all musical shapes 
and financial sizes. The end of a calen- 
dar year and even Holiday revelry do 
not grind to a halt the activities of rec- 
ord companies, of course, but they are 
convenient occasions for the Industry 
to take-five and take stock of record 
industry past, present and future. 

Since we have already surveyed the 
past, and present, we’ll concern our- 
selves with the future — the year 1967, 
that is. There Is little doubt that the 
start of the New Year will continue to 
be hey-days for pressing plants around 
the country. Activity of pressing plants 
has been the consistent evidence of- 
fered by companies to indicate that 
sales, especially LP product, are boom- 
ing. Some of the industry's largest 
disk operations have, in fact, noted 
that their own overburdened pressing 
facilities have necessitated courtesy 
calls on other plants to fill orders for 
product. This healthy state is even 
more remarkable when one considers 
that this Holiday Season has once 
again failed to produce a strong Yule- 
themed traffic builder. And with top- 
line new material waiting in the wings 
for release Jan. 1 or thereabouts, 1967 
should benefit greatly from the mo- 
mentum of the closing weeks of 1966, 


As for that new product, it’s inter- 
esting to note that many labels are 
sending them off with great hulla- 
balloo, particularly at special sales 
conventions, which. In some cases, will 
match those summertime conventions 
that introduce product for the fall- 
winter season. 

i 

The industry is also fortunate, as 
our poll results will attest to, to have 
so many strong acts who show every 
indication that their popularity has 
staying-power. While it would stifle the 
industry to be without newcomers of 
note, this powerhouse reserve from 
1966’s showing can easily pick-up any j 
slack that could develop In the recruit- 1 
ment of catalog sounds. 

The number of solid acts that came 
along In 1966 points up, we feel, the 
large age groupings to which they ap- 
peal, and the best guarantee of sus- | 
tained success Is to attract a good 
cross section of the recording buying 
public. This is a key reason why 1966 
hit the spot, and why the coming year 
should do likewise. 

From our vantage point, 1967 looks 
like a Happy New Year! 


1 








iJ 


Cash Box TOP 100 


DECEMBER 31, 1966 


14 


12 


10 


11 


13 


38 


29 


22 


24 


17 


10 


57 


13 


21 


18 


16 


15 


12/24 12/17 

TM A BELIEVER 

MONKEES-Colgems-1002 1 

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL 

NEW VAUDEVILE BAND- 

Fontana-1562 2 

SNOOPY VS THE RED BARON 

ROYAL GUARDSMEN-Laurie-3366 5 

MELLOW YELLOW 

DONOVAN-Epic- 10098 3 

THAT'S LIFE 

FRANK SINATRA-Reprise-531 7 

GOOD VIBRATIONS 

BEACH BOYS-Capil'ol-5676 4 

SUGAR TOWN 

NANCY SINATRA-Reprise-527 9 

TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

AARON NEVILLE-Parlow-101 

COMING HOME SOLDIER 

BOBBY VINTON-Epic-10090 

A PLACE IN THE SUN 

STEVIE WONDER-Tannla-54139 

BORN FREE 

ROGER WlLLIAMS-Kapp-767 

(I KNOW) I'M LOSING YOU 

THE TEMPTATIONS-Gordy-7057 

DEVIL WITH A BLUE DRESS ON & 
GOOD GOLLY MISS MOLLY 

MITCH RYDER & DETROIT WHEELS- 
New Voice“817 6 

GOOD THING 

PAUL REVERE & RAIDERS- 

Columbia-43907 35 

SINGLE GIRL 

SANDY POSEY-MGM-13612 

WORDS OF LOVE 

MAMAS & PAPAS-Dunhill-4057 

CRY 

RONNIE DOVE-Diamond-214 

MUSTANG SALLY 

WILSON PlCKETT-Atlantic-2365 

STANDING IN THE SHADOW OF 
LOVE ^ 

FOUR TOPS-Motown-1 102 

EAST WEST 

HERMAN'S HERMITS-MGM-13639 

TALK TALK 

MUSIC MACHINE-Original Sound-61 

1 NEED SOMEBODY 

_? (QUESTJON MARKJ & MYSTERIANS 
Cdmeo-441 

MAME _ 

HERB ALPERT-A&M-823 

TELL IT TO THE RAIN 

4 SEASONS-Philips-40412 


46 

20 24 

31 35 

21 31 

18 22 


58 


53 


29 


30 


20 


36 


55 


26 


43 


33 


(I'M NOT YOUR) STEPPING STONE 

MONKEES-Colgems-1002 25 

I'VE PASSED THIS WAY BEFORE 

JIMMY RUFFIN-Sour-32027 34 

LADY GODIVA 

PETER & GORDON-Capitol-5740 8 

IT TEARS ME UP " ' 

-PERC^X SLEPGE-Atlantic-2358 15 

TRY A^LtTTLE Tenderness 

OTIS REDDINGrVoIt-141 - 39 

YOU KEEP ME HANGIN*^ ON 

' SU,PT?EMES-Moto^‘-Tl OT -g/ ' 16" , 

WHISPERS 

JACKIE W I LSQN-Bnjnswick'-5S300 23 

PANDORA'S GOLDEN HEEBIE : 
JEEBIES ^ 

THE AS50aATI0N-VQlidnf-755.' ’ 26 

STOP STOP STOP 

HOLLIES-liYiperial-66214 , ~ 19 


34 

35 

36 


12/24 12/17 


IT'S ONLY LOVE 

TOMMY JAMES & SHONDELLS- 


40 

41 


43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 


52 

i 54 

I 

i 

! 

55 

56 

57 

• 

59 

60 


Roujette-471 0 

27 

27 

HAPPENINGS TEN YEARS TIME 
AGO 


YARDBIRDS-Epic-10094 

HELP ME GIRL 

37 

40 

ANIMALS-MGM-13636 

GEORGY GIRL 

43 

51 

SEEKERS-CQpitol-7556 

NASHVILLE CATS 

56 

61 

LOVIN' SPOONFUL-Kama Sutra-219 

52 

65 

WE AIN'T GOT NOTHIN' YET 


BLUES MAGOOS-Mercury-7622 

I'VE GOT THE FEELIN' 

51 

68 

NEIL DIAMOND-Bang-536 

I'M READY FOR LOVE 

MARTHA & THE VANDELLAS- 

28 

23 

Gordy-7056 

WHERE WILL THE WORDS 
COME FROM 

33 

11 

GARY LEWIS-Liberty-55933 

KNOCK ON WOOD 

53 

64 

EDDIE FLOYD-Stax-194 

I'M THE ONE YOU NEED 

32 

33 

MIRACLES-Tamla-54140 

I'M YOUR PUPPET 

30 

25 

JAMES & BOBBY PURIFY-Bell-648 

1 (WHO HAVE NOTHING) 

TERRY KNIGHT & PACK- 

41 

12 

Lucky Eleven-230 

1 FOOLED YOU THIS TIME 

42 

44 

GENE CHANDLER-Checker-1 155 

HELP ME GIRL 

54 

59 

OUTSI DERS-Capitol-5759 

COLOR MY WORLD 

43 

51 

PET CLARK-Wamer Bros.-5882 

GALLANT MEN 

76 


SENATOR DIRKSEN-CapitoI-5085 

98.6 

60 

81 

KEITH-Mercury-72639 

61 

67 

THERE'S GOT TO BE A WORD 


INNOCENCE-Kama Sutra-214 

STAND BY ME 

55 

66 

SPYDER TURNER-MGM-13617 

68 

73 

YOU CAN BRING ME ALL YOUR 
HEARTACHES 


LOU RAWLS-Capitol-5790 

A HAZY SHADE OF WINTER 

SIMON & GARFUNKEL- 

49 

47 

Columbia-43873 

RUN, RUN, LOOK & SEE 

45 

17 

BRIAN HYLAND-Philips-4040 

GHOST RIDERS IN THE SKY 

44 

42 

BAJA MARIMBA BAND-A&M-824 

PAPA WAS TOO 

62 

63 

JOE TEX-Dial-4051 

GOODNIGHT MY LOVE 

67 

84 

HAPPENINGS-B. T. Puppy-523 

BAD MISUNDERSTANDING 

66 

70 

CRITTERS-Kapp-793 

64 

69 


HOW DO YOU CATCH A GIRL 

SAM THE SHAM & PHARAOHS- 




MGM-3649 

86 

— 

14 

• 

ANOTHER NIGHT 





DIONNE WARWICK-Scepter-12181 

82 

— 

48 

63 

KARATE 





EMPERORS-Mala-543 

71 

76 

6 

64 

LET THE GOOD TIMES IN 





DEAN MARTI N-Reprise-538 

72 

78 

'l9 

6S 

THE GIRL THAT STOOD BESIDE ME 



BOBBY DARIN-Atlantic-2365 

70 

74 


66 

BLUE AUTUMN 



28 


BOBBY GOLDSBORO-UA-50087 

74 

80 


KNIGHT IN RUSTY ARMOUR 

PETER & GORDON-Capitol-5808 — 


69 

70 

• 

72 

74 

• 

76 

77 

78 


80 

81 

82 

83 


85 


90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 
100 
100 


12/24 12/17 

HELLO HELLO i 

SOPWITH CAMEL-Kama Sutra-217 95 97 ,i 

GOING NOWHERE 

LOS BRAVOS-Pre3S-60003 73 77 , 

MAMA ; 

CHER-lmperial-66223 75 82 ' 

WACK WACK 

YOUNG HOLT TRIO-Brunswick-55305 81 100 ll 

LOOK WHAT YOU'VE DONE i 

POZO SECO SINGERS-Columbia-43927 78 85 i 

YOU GOT ME HUMMIN' ,i 

SAM & DAVE-Stax-204 83 98 ,, 

ARE YOU LONELY FOR ME 

FREDDIE SCOTT-Shout-207 78 85 

MUSIC TO WATCH GIRLS BY 

BOB CREWE GENERATION- i' 

DynoVoice-229 — — il 

I'M GONNA MISS YOU J 

ARTISTICS- Brunswick-5530 79 86 i 

PUSHIN' TOO HARD 

SEEDS-GNP-372 80 83 

I HAD TOO MUCH TO DREAM ' 

(LAST NIGHT) ' 

THE ELECTRIC PRUNES-Reprise-532 85 88 ^ 

GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME 

TOM JONES-Parrot-40009 93 95 il 

COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN 

ROY ORBISON-MGM- 13634 88 90 a 

WISH ME A RAINBOW , 

GUNTER KALLMANN-4 Cbrners-138 84 87 , 

KIND OF A DRAG u ; i 

BUCKINGHAMS-USA-8968 89 — * 

JUST ONE SMILE f 

GENE PITNEY-Musicor-12-]9 _ 91 99 

HEY LEROY, YOUR MAMA'S - i 

.'■-L- VA'lFiOl'sjJ I 




87 


96 — 


90 


100 


96 


919-4 


CALLING YOU 

JIMMY CASTOR-SmaslV-2069 ' ' ^ 

IF YOU GO AWAY " " 

DAMITA JO‘Epic-5-:]0061 

IT'S NOW WINTER'S DAY 

TOMMY ROE-ABC- 10888 

PRETTY BALLERINA 

LEFT BANKE-Smash-2074 

I DIG GIRLS 

J. J. JACKSON-Calla-125 

DEAD END STREET 

KINKS-Reprise^540 

BABY WHAT I MEAN 

DRIFTERS-Atlantic-2366 

GRIZZLY BEAR 

YOUNGBLOODS-RCA-901 5 

LOOK AT GRANNY^RUN RUN 

HOWARD TATE-Veti/e-l 0464 -.r 100 

SHADOW OF YOUR SMILE 

BOOTS RANDOLPH-MonLlment-976 94^ 

LOVE ME 

BOBBY HEBB-Philips-40421 — 

TAKE ME FOR A LITTLE WHII,E 

-- PATTI LaBEtLE & THE BLUEBEttES^. ' 

' Atlantic-2373 - . ' ^ 

MERCY, MERCY, MER^Y 

CANNONBALL' ADDERLY- : 

CapitoJ-5798 : . , jJiij ■.Val I 

LITTLE BLACK EGG 

NIGHTCRAWLERS-Kdfjipj709 . 

OH YEAH! :--j -w-ine!”' 

JOE CUBA-i^XTET-TiGO-J490 

WALK 

2 OF CLUBS-Fraternity-975 

THE PARTY , , , , , 

. -HECTOR RIVERA-Barry.-lQi,<)''' ' ‘ At 

CONSTANT RAIN" 

SERGICT 'MENDES-A&M-825 s '-='2L. 

WALK WITH FAITH IN YOUR , 
HEART^-- 

' , BACHE-LORS-London-20018-v?r=i'T;afv,f:i ^ 


91 


33 


100 — 


99 — 


ALPHABETIZED TOP 100 (INCLUDING PUBLISHERS AND LICENSEES) 


A Hazy Shade Of Winfer (Charing Cross BMI) . 55 

A Place In The Sun (Molown BMI) 10 

Another Night' (Blue Sear, Jac ASCAP)- ...... 62 

Are' You Lonely For Me (Web IV| .......... . 74 

At The Party .(Twin BMI) 100 

Baby-Whot I Mean (Unart BMI) 90"- 

Ba'd Misunderstanding (Kama Sutra Music BMI) ..''60 

Blue Autumn (Una^^ BMI) . 66 

Born Free (Screen Gems, (j^umbfo BMI) ......... 11 

Color My World (Northern ASCAP) 49 

(coming- Home Sbldier- IFeather 'BMl) . . 9 

Corrimunication Sredlcdown ' (Acuff, Rose BMI) . >. . . 80 

Constant Rain_(Peer lnt‘1 BMI) 100 

Cry;(Shapirp Bernstptn'XSCAP) 4 a'. ... .‘,..!.17 

Dej^d End Street (Mondvies, Noma BM.l} 89 . 

p^iyVhh Ar-^lue Bress^l-^obele, Venice fiM^ *1'3 ‘ 

Eas^ West (Man Ken BMfj . 1 ... ^20 

Gallant Men {Chappell ASCAP) .50 

G^gy GJrl (Chappell ASCAP) \ 37 

Ghost Riders In The Sky (Morris ASCAP) 57 

Girl That Stood Beside Me (Chardon BMI) 65 

Going Nowhere (April ASCAP) 69 

Good Thing (Daywin BMI) 14 

Good Vibrations (Sea Of Tunes BMI) 6 

Goodnight My Love (Captain Marble BMI) 59 

Green Green -Gross- Of-Home JTree BMI) , 79 

Grizzl/^Bear (Whitfield BMI)^ . .91 


Hoppenings Ten Years Time Ago (Yardbirds, 

Leo Feist ASCAP) 35 

Hello, Hello (Great Honesty BMI) 68 

Help Me Girl (Helios BMI) 36, 48 

Hey Leroy, Your Mama's Calling You (Bozort BMI) 84 

How Do You Catch A Girl (Fred Rose BMI) 61 

1 (Who Have Nothing) (Milky Way Trio, Cotillion 

- BMI) 46 

I Dig Girls (Meager BM!) 88 

1 Fooled You This Time (Cochond, Golinee BMI) 47 

1 Had Too Much To Dream (Lost Nigh!) (4 Star 

BMI) 78 

I Need Somebody (Cameo Parkway BMI) 22 

If You Go Away (E. B. Marks BMI) 85 

I'm A Believer (Screen Gems, Columbia BMI) .... 1 

I'm Gonna- Miss You (Jalynne BMI) 76 

(I Know) I’m Losing You (Jobete BMI) 12 

I'm Ready For Love (Jobete BMI) 41 

I'm The One You Need (Jobete BMI) 44 

I'm Your Puppet (Fame BMI) 45 

It Tears Me Up (Fame BMI) 28 

It’s Now Winter’s Day (Low Twi BMI) 86 

It's Only Love (Tender Tunes BMI) 34 

I've Got The Feelin’ (Jalynne BMI) 40 

I’ve Passed This Way Before (Jobete BMI) 26 

Just One Smile (January BMI) 83 

Xorate (Wilson BMI) 63 

Kind Of A Drag (Galileo BMI) 82 


Knight In Rusty Armour (Barricade ASCAP) 67 

Knock On Wood (East BMI) 43 

Lady Godtvo (Regent BM!) 27 

Let The Good Times In (Smooth BMI) 64 

Litttle Black Egg (Alison ASCAP) 97 

Look At Granny Run Run (Ragmor, Rumbalero BMI) 92 
Look What You’ve Done (Pocketful Of Tunes, 

Noma BMI) 72 

Love Me (Act IN, Downstairs BMI) 94 

Mama (Chris Marc-Cotillion BMI) 70 

Marne (E. H. Morris ASCAP) 23 

Mellow Yellow (Donovan Ltd. BMI) 4 

Mercy, Mercy, Mercy (Zawinul BMI) 96 

Music To Watch Girls By (SCP ASCAP) 75 

Mustang Sally (Fourteenth Hour BMI) 18 

Nashville Cats (Faithful Virtue BMI) 38 

98.6 (Screen Gems, Columbia BMI) 51 

Oh Yeah (Cordon BMI) 98 

Pandora's Golden Heebie Jeebies (Beechood BMI) 32; 

Papa Was Too (Tree BMI) , 58 

Pretty Ballerina (Lazy Day ^Ml) ..-'87 

Pushin' Too Hard (Neil, Seeds BMI) ...7^ 

Run, Run, Look & See (Little Darlin*, Low Twi 

BMI) 56 

Shadow Of Your Smile (Miller ASCAP) 93 

Single Girl (Combine BM!) 15. 

Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron (Fuller, SanphiU. - .-f- 

Windsong BMI) 3 


^ ™ ^ ^ 

Stand By Me (Progressive BMH 1 53 ji 

''Standing In The Shadow Of Ldve^- (Jobete BMI) .. 19 
Stepping Stone (Screen Gems, Columbia BMI) .... 25 

Stop Stop Stop (Maribus BMU 33 ,\ 

Sugar Town (Criterion BMI) ..i 7 

Take Me For A Little;. Wh'lp ti-oUtpop BMI) 

Talk Talk (Thrush BMI) ' 21 IJ 

Tell it Like It Is (Orlop BMI) 8 

Tell It To The Rain (Saturday, Seasons 4 BMI) .. 24 
That's, Life (4 Star TV BMI) ;-.i. .1. 5 j! 

There's Got To Be A “Word (KamoiSufra Music - 1, 

BMI) 52 

Try, A Little Tenderness (Campbell, Connell, il 

Wack Wack (Yo Yo BMlj ' 71 

Walk Tall (Miller ASCAP) . .VT. . 99 

Walk With Faith In Your Heart (Tee Pee AstApj 1 00 
We Ain't Got Nothin’ Yet (Anangd, Rdnga BMI) . 39 
Where Will The Words Cdme From (Vivd''fiMl)''i . . 42 ^ 

Whispers . (Jalynne, BRC BMI) > v . i-i. 31 lij 

Winchester: Cathedral (Southern. ASCAPlj!5r,,*»,.v. ... 2 

Vi^isfi Me A Rainbow (Famous ASCAP| 81 I*’ 

-Words Of Love (Trousdale- B^^); .j ^ , T6 |J 
You Can Bring Me AM Your Heartaches (Raw tou ji 
, BMI) . K’. ; . .'-.v,; , .V.^' Uv 54 ^ 

'YoU Got Me Hummln* (Pfan#6*EasF BMi) /. . . U . . 73 
You Keep Me Hanglrtg; On '{Jobete BMl) '30 d 


COMPILES PROM LEADtNG RETAIL OUTLETS— DOES NOT INCLUDE AIRPLAY REPORTS • MAW UrWAM MOV! 


r 



40009 


^ DC/^ADr\e 


R€CORDS 


division of 


RECORDS 


division of 


RECORDS 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


5 



II 


N1 

lis 


King is the Man to Watch! 

NOWAVAILABLE- 
“MDSIC TO WATCH GIRLS BY” 
LPM/LSP'3773 

Al^^int®Hirt's new album features the 
hit song, composed, arranged and 
conducted by Sid Ramin, plus 10 more swingers 
with the happy Hirt sound. 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



U. 5, Musk Boom Still Booming 


NEW YORK — The U.S. continues to 
listen-along, sing-along, play-along at 
a tremendous pace, reports the 13th 
annual survey by BMI, “Concert 
Music USA, 1967.” 

As for disks, record sales are the 
fastest growing segment of personal 
music purchases, rising from .062% 
to .184% of personal consumption. 
Purchases of album sales hit $598 
million in 1965. The personal con- 
sumption figures do not include pur- 
chases of phonos or radios, nor ad- 
missions to musical events, but only 
purchases of records, sheet music, 
musical instruments and accesories. 
During the past two decades, the 
music industry’s percentage of annual 
personal consumption expenditures 
nearly doubled. 

According to the American Sym- 
phony Orchestra League, Americans 
support 1,385 symphony orchestras — 
more than half the world’s total. 

Quoting Opera News, “Concert 
Music USA, 1967” points out that 
Americans attended 4,777 perform- 
ances of 295 works given by 752 
opera-producing groups. 

Using statistics compiled by the 
American Music Conference, the story 
of music education is highlighted by 
reports of 65,500 musical groups — 
orchestras, bands and “stage” bands 
—in schools across the country. The 
figure does not include the numerous 
ensemble, folk and chamber music 
groups found in many schools, or the 
many combos formed by young people 
on their own initiative. 

The 492 orchestras reporting their 
1965-66 programs to the annual BMI/ 
ASOL Survey performed works by 573 
20th-century composers out of this 783 
whose works were played. A total of 
6,720 performances of 20th-century 
works was given by these groups, and 


three times as many 20th-century 
composers were performed by these 
orchestras, with theii’ works provid- 
ing one-third of all performances. 

Dui’ing 1965, Americans spent a 
staggering $598,000,000 on LP’s, with 
concert music accounting for about 
15% of that arnount. The choice of 
recorded music is vast and continues 
to grow. The Schwann Long Playing 
Record Catalog for November, 1966, 
listed music issued on 559 labels. 

About 39,300,000 American devoted 
some of their leisure time to making 
music. In 1939, there were only 
14,300,000 amateur musicians and 

19.000. 000 as recently as 1950. In 
1965, Americans spent about $900,- 
000,000 on instruments, accessories 
and sheet music. 

The piano, with 22,700,000 players 
is still the favorite instrument, ac- 
cording to American Music Conference 
figures. Guitar ranks second with 

9.000. 000 players. Rounding out the 
top 10 favorite instruments were the 
organ (4,000,000), woodwinds (3,700,- 
000), brass instruments (3,500,000), 
“C” melody fiute (2,200,000), stringed 
instruments (2,000,000), accordion 
(1,100,000), drums and ukulele (1,000,- 

(Continued on page 36B) 


Capitol's JFK 'Probe' Packi^ May 


Add More Fuel To Great Controversy 


NEW YORK — A Capitol album cover- 
mg the assassination of President 
Kennedy is expected to make several 
revelations that will grab nation-wide 
headlines. 

The LP, “The Controversy,” is 
being rushed by the label for release 
on Jan. 6, as part of its new Probe 
documentary series. Cash Box ex- 
clusively made known the production 
of the LP in the issue of Dec. 3. 

Actually, Capitol decided to market 
the set several weeks before orig- 
inally planned. This was done in view 
of the now settled litigation by the 
President’s widow, Jacqueline Kenne- 
dy, initiated to stop the publication 
of William Manchester’s, “Death of 
a President.” A serialized version of 


FF^ONT COVER: 



Tommy Roe began 1966 with an 
ABC waxing called “Sweet Pea,” and 
— talk of unhurried hits! — the date 
reached its peak, number 9 on the 
Cash Box Top 100 on Aug. 6. This 
was not to be pattern for future 
dates since his follow-up, “Hooray 
for Hazel,” and current side, “It’s 
Now a Winter’s Day,” got quicker 
chart reaction. Tommy, who is a 
regular on the “Where the Action Is” 
IV series, is now on a domestic tour. 

+ Tommy will be released 

convention in Holly- 
wood, Fla. next month. 


Beach Boys Form Label 

HOLLYWOOD — The Beach Boys have 
formed their own record company. 
Brother Records. Based out of a yet- 
to-be-announced Hollywood office, the 
company is in the process of estab- 
lishing an artist and exec roster, 
according to Brian Wilson, producer 
of BB sessions and writer of their 
hits. Wilson will be exec producer of 
the label. He serves as a Beach Boy 
at the group’s Capitol recording ses- 
sions, but does not make the road 
with the team, which also consists 
of Carl Wilson, Dennis Wilson and 
Mike Love. A1 Jardine and Bruce 
Johnston appear with the BB’s on 
tour. 

Brian Wilson also noted that the 
new company is presently negotiating 
distribution agreements with a U.S. 
and foreign labels. 

It’s understood that the BB’s pact 
with Capitol has two more years to 
run. There was no indication last 
week as to what the formation of 
Brother Records could mean in the 
team’s future relationship with Capi- 
tol. 


AF Oswald Interyiew 


NEW YORK — Audio Fidelity Records 
is releasing an LP called “Lee Harvey 
Oswald Speaks.” Oswald, termed the 
killer of President Kennedy by the 
Warren Commission, heard in a radio 
interview made Aug. 13, 1963 by a 
New Orleans radio station. Oswald is 
interviewed as he stands on a street- 
comer passing out literature for the 
Fair Play for Cuba Committee, of 
which he was a member. The tapes 
were brought to the attention of AF 
through Aubrey Mayhew, who runs 
AF’s country label. Little Darlin’. 


the now famous book is ready to start 
in the Jan. 10 issue of Look Magazine. 

Capitol, of the belief that the LP 
vdll be of “extraordinary national 
significance,” will preview the sec at 
a press conference to be held Tues- 
day, Jan. 3, at the Americana Hotel 
in New York. 

Alan Livingston, president of Capi- 
tol, who will preside at the press con- 
ference, noted last week that the LP 
contains a number of “news firsts” 
not previously presented via other 
communications media. This includes 
an interview with Jack Ruby, the 
killer of Lee Harvey Oswald, named 
by the Warren Commission as the 
lone murderer of the late President, 
and Oswald himself. There are also 
statements by eye-witnesses who sup- 
port the “second assassin” theory; 
critics and advocates of the Warren 
report, and personal descriptions of 
the assassination and its aftermath 
by members of President Kennedy’s 
motorcade. 

Lawrence Schiller, who produced 
the LP, traveled over 11,000 miles to 
tape interviews with many different 
participants in the tragic events of 
Nov. 22, 1963. Schiller has produced 
all Probe LP’s to date, including one 
on LSD, the late comic Lenny Bruce 
and an upcoming entry on homosexu- 
ality, due for release at the end of 
January. 


MIDEM Shapes- Up As Publishers’ Bag 


NEW YORK — With a month to go be- 
fore the event takes place, MIDEM, 
the International Record & Music 
Publishing Market, is shaping up as a 
meeting-ground for the world of 
music publishing. 

A listing of companies signed-up as 
of Dee. 10 indicates that while a host 
of top foreign labels will be present 
at the 5-day confab in Cannes, France 
(Jan. 30-Feb. 4), publishers are pen- 
ciling in that period as a “must.” 

As for American-based company in- 
terest, this, too, reflects an event 
catering to music publishing more 
than any other segment of the busi- 
ness. However, overall interest from 
the American end of the music scene 
is slight with only two major U.S. 
labels, Columbia Records and Atlantic 
Records, coming on their own behalf. 
RCA Victor, for instance, has not an- 
nounced plans to attend, although RCA 


France and RCA Italiana will have 
representation. Some small American 
labels, such as GoGo Records, the 
Grief-Garris company handled through 
Epic Records, B-Atlas and Jody Rec- 
ords and Mira Productions, have also 
signed up. 

From the music publishing end, 
American participation includes A1 
Gallico Music, Jewell Music, Regent 
Music, Schroeder Music, Phil Specter’s 
Spectarious Music and London Rec- 
ords’ Burlington-Felsted operation. 

Participation by Italian and Great 
Britain music companies, both labels 
and music publishers, is running ahead 
of all other nations. 

Clint Wade, American rep for 
MIDEM, addressed a luncheon of the 
International Record & Music Men’s 
Club here last week (20), filling in 
those attending on the event. Wade 
runs a public relations firm at 360 
East 55th St., this city. 


Bob Morgan Tops MGM’s A&R Operations 


INDEX 

Album Plans 24 

Album Reviews 34-35 

Basic Album Inventory 3g 

Coin Machine Section 52-62 

Country Album Reviews 41 

Country Music Section 41-44 

Focus On Jazz 22 

International Cover 45 

International Section 45-51 

Juke Box Ops Record (luide 57 

Looking Ahead (Albums) 37 

Looking Ahead (Singles) 12 

New Chart Additions 18 

Platter Spinner Patter ...!.!! 30 

R&B Top 50 ' ’ ’ 28 

Radio Active Chart !!!!!!!. 8 

Record Ramblings 20 

Singles Reviews ’ 14 

Sure Shots ic 

Talent On Stage !« 

Top 100 Albums 37 

Top 100 Labels 35 

Upcoming Events 30 


NEW YORK — Bob Morgan has joined 
MGM Records as director of A&R 
operators - exec producer. Morgan, 
most recently head of Epic Records’ 
pop A&R, will head a program that 
will realize a greater output of in- 
ternally produced material designed to 
build catalog product. 

He’ll supervise concept and plan- 
ning for all MGM/Verve artists and 
be active in the acquisition of new 
talent and masters. While he does not 
intend to produce sessions right off 
the bat, he told Cash Box, he will 
eventually make specific albums with 
MGM/Verve pactees. For the time be- 
ing, he explained, he will seek to ob- 
tain an “idea of the label’s current 
internal A&R picture.” MGM’s A&R 
roster includes Tom Wilson and Pete 
Spargo in New York, Jim Vino in 
Nashville and Jesse Kaye on the west 
coast. 

Morgan comes to MGM from eight 
years of service with the Columbia 
organization. For the past three 
years, he has been responsible for all 
popular product and A&R producers 
with Epic. 

In his tenure with Columbia and 
Epic, Morgan was responsible for dis- 
covering many name acts which he 
recorded. They include the Dave Clark 
Five, The Yardbirds, The Brothers 
Four, The Clancy Brothers and 'Tom- 


my Makem, Damita Jo and Enzo 
Stuarti. 

He produced all of the Bobby Vin- 
ton Epic hits, including “Roses Are 
Red” and “Mr. Lonely” and was re- 
sponsible for the Brothers Four hit 
of “Greenfields.” He also made singles 
and albums by George Maharis, Jerry 
Vale, Bobby Hackett, Jimmy Dean, 
Cliff Richard, Damita Jo, Godfrey 
Cambridge and Buddy Greco, among 
others. 


BRIGHT BEST IN '66 
MGM/VERVE 



NEW YORK — MGM Records con- 
tinued a pattern of sales success with 
returns on the first quarter of fiscal 
’67 showing a 72% increase over the 
same period last year, according to 
Mort Nasatir, president. MGM and 
its varied divisions have already given 
the operation its best year in history 
this year. 

According to Nasatir, each of the 
label’s product wings “contributed to 
(Continued on page 32) 


ATLANTIC 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


NEW YORK — According to the year 
end report of Atlantic president 
Ahmet Ertegun the company enjoyed 
the greatest year in its history dur- 
ing 1966. Sal eswere reported as be- 
ing up 50 percent over 1965. Ertegun 
also credited such producers as Jim 
Stewart of Stax-Volt, Ollie McLaugh- 
lin of Karen and Carla, Quin Ivy and 
Rick Hall of Fame and Dial’s Buddy 
Killen for contributing enormously to 
the great year enjoyed by Atlantic- 
Atco. 

During ’66 the firm scored as one 
of the hottest singles labels in the 
business with nearly 50 chart items 
(Continued on page 36B) 


7 





RADIO ACTIVE 
CHARTS 


Bobby Moore 


rsY «! 

VE AfiAIN 

CHECKER 1156 


Bo Diddley 

OOH BABY 

CHECKER 1158 


Bobby McClure 



CHECKER 1152 


Gene Chandler 

I FOOLED 
YOU 

THIS TIME 

CHECKER 1155 


Andrea Davis 

LONELY 

GIRL 


CHESS 1980 



A survey of key radio stations in all important markets throughout the country to determine by percentage of those 
reporting which releases are being add^ to station play lists this week for the first time and also the degree of con- 
centration combining previous reports. Percentage figures on left indicate how many of the stations reporting this 
week hove added the following titles to their play list for the first time. Percentage figures on right include Mai 
from left plus the percentage title received in prior week or weeks. (SURVEY COMPLETED TO DECEMBER 21, 1966) 


% OF STATIONS 
ADDING TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 

THIS WEEK 

title artist label 

TOTAL % OF 
STATIONS TO HAVE 
ADDED TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 

TO DATE 

47 % 

Color My World — Petula Clark — Warner Bros. 

92% 

46% : 

How Do You Catch A Girl — Sam The Sham — MGM 

79% 

45 % 

Communication Breakdown — Roy Orbison — MGM 

66% 

44 % ! 

Music To Watch Girls By — Bob Crewe Generation — DynoVoice 

44% 

43% 

1 Got To Go Back — McCoys — Bang 

53% 

42% 

Knight In Rusty Armour — Peter & Gordon — Capitol 

48% 

41 % 

Dead End Street — Kinks — Reprise 

60% 

40% 

Kind Of A Drag — Buckinghams — USA 

82% 

39% 

Green Green Grass Of Home — Tom Jones — Parrot 

88% 

38% 

Another Night — Dionne Warwick — Scepter 

92% 

37% 

Pretty Ballerina — Left Banke — Smash 

61% 

36% 

It’s Now Winter’s Day — Tommy Roe — ABC 

59% 

35% 

1 Had Too Much To Dream — Electric Prunes — Reprise 

82% 

34% 

Gimme Some Lovin’ — Spencer Davis Groups— U. A. 

54% 

32% 

Grizzly Bear — Youngbloods — RCA 

47% 

31 % 

Hello, Hello Sopwith Camel — Kama Sutra 

94% 

30% 

Love Me Bobby Hebb^— Philips 

30% 

28% 

Full Measure — Lovin’ Spoonful — Kama Sutra 

28% 

27% 

You Can Tell Me Goodbye — Casinos — Fraternity 

27% 

26% 

Walk With Faith In Your Heart — Bachelors — London 

31% 

25% 

Bittersweet — Robbs — Mercury 

33% 

24% 

Wack Wack — Young Holt Trio— Brunswick 

62% 

22% 

Baby What 1 Mean — Drifters — Atlantic 

58% 

21 % 

Stand By Me — -Spyder Turner — MGM 

66% 

20% 

Hard Lovin’ Loser — Judy Collins — Elektra 

45% 

19% 

Wish Me A Rainbow — Gunter Kallmann — 4 Corners 

76% 

18% 

Look What You’ve Done — -Pozo Seco Singers^— Colombia 

80% 

17% 

That’s The Tune — Vogues — Co & Ce 

24% 

16% 

Hey Leroy — Jimmy Castor — Smash 

16% 

15% 

Constant Rain — Sergio Mendes — A&M 

36% 

14% 

' Catch Me In The Meadow— Trade Winds — Kama Sutra 

20% 

13% 

There Goes My Everything — Don Cherry — Monument 

18% 

12% 

! Little Black Egg — ^Nightcrawlers — Kapp 

17% 

n % 

Just One Smile^— Gene Pitney— Musicor 

1 

36% 


LESS THAN 10% BUT MOIK THAN 5% 

Total % To Date 


Sweet Sounds Of Summer 
Shangri Las (Dang) 

26% 

Love Me Longer 

Vic Damone (RCA) 

7% 

Little White Lies 

Motley Blues Band (Scepter) 

6% 

Walk Tall 

2 Of Clubs (Fraternity) 

8% 

Midnight Hour 

Kit & The Outlaws (Philips) 

6% 

Hard To Get Thing Called Love 
Tony Bruno (UA) 

5% 

Don't Go Out Into The Rain 
Seagulls (Columbia) 

8% 

Hurry Sundown 

Peter, Paul & Mary (Warner Bros.) 

6% 

She Comes In Colors 

Love (Elektra) 

12% 

Love Is After Me 

Charlie Rich (Hi) 

7% 

Last Night 

Georgia Fame (Imperial) 

6% 

I'm A Boy 

The Who (Decco) 

5% 






't 


8 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


The 

last 

big 

hit 

of 

’ 66 . 

The 

first 

big 

hit 

of 

’6T 





PECCA@ 32078 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 





lEWYEARWinMIiKNEWIlIRi! 



PETE FOUNTAIN 

Plays 


BILL ANDERSON 

Sings 


^ORAI 


65606 


DECCAI© 32077 




Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


11 







Mom. 


"u+*-X!Tfrr4xnT/f' 


LOOKING AHEAD 



A compilation, in order of strength, of up and coming records showing signs of breaking into The Cosh Box Top 100. List is compiled from retail outlets. 


1 i'VI GOT TO HAVE A REASON 

® (Bfonston — 6A1/j 

Dave Clark Five (Fpic 10114} 

^ i'M GONNA MAKE YOU 
^ LOVi ME 

Dee Dee Warwick (Mercury 72638) 

% WEDDING BELL BLUES 

^ /Celestial — BMI) 

Laura Nyro (Verve folkways 5024) 

1 THERE'S SOMETHING ON 
^ YOUR MIND 

(Mercedes — 8M I } 

Baby Ray (Imperial 66216) 

5 SINCE I DON'T HAVE YOU 

IBonnyview — ASCAPj 

Lou Christie (MGM 13623) 

6 DAY TRIPPER 

(Moclen — BMI) 

Ramsey Lewis (Cadet 13477) 

7 GIMME SOME LOVIN' 

* (Essex— ASCAP) 

Spencer Davis Group (UA 50I0S) 

8 OH BABY 

(ABC Music— BMI) 

Bo Diddley (Checker 1158) 

9 TINY BUBBLES 

(Granite — ASCAPj 
Don Ho (Reprise 507) 

I A THE TRAMP 

^Modern — BMI) 

Lowell fulsom (Kent 456) 

1 1 I GOT TO GO BACK 

■ ' fWefa IV, Trio— BMI) 

McCoys (Bang 538) 

17 THAT'S THE TUNE 

(TM-BMI) 

Vogues (Co & Ce 242) 


1 A LET'S FALL IN LOVE 

■ ^ I'Bourne — ASCAPj 

Peaches & Herb (Date 1623) 

1 C SOUL SUPERMAN 

® ^ (MUtbridge, Poiarh — BMI) 

Hesitations (Kapp 790) 

IT TAKES TWO 

(Jobete — BMI) 

Kim Weston & Marvin Gaye 
(Tamla 54141) 

17 HURRY SUNDOWN 

' ' (Northern— ASCAP) 

Peter, Paul & Mary (Warner Bros. 5883) 

1 Q I LOVE MY DOG 

* ” (Speclorious — BMI) 

Cat Stevens (Deram 7501) 

1 q I'M YOUR BREAD MAKER 
' ' BABY 

(Exceflorec, Jamil — BM/j 
S/;m Harpo (Excetio 2282) 

70 your EVER CHANGIN' MIND 

(Gil— BMI) 

Crispian St. Peters (Jamie 1328) 

71 A GOOD LOVE 

* * (Ragmar, Crenshaw — BMI) 

Lorraine fllison (Warner Bros. 5879) 

ALL 

{B. 8. Marks — BMI) 

James Darren (Warner Brothers 5874) 

7*3 I'VE LOST MY HEART AGAIN 

(Bourne— ASCAP) 

Jerry Vale (Columbia 43895) 

JA HARD LOVIN' LOSER 

(Wilmark-BMI) 

Judy Collins (Elektra 45610) 

75 BEND IT 

(Spectorious — BMI) 

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tick 
(Fontana 1559) 




|0 WHAT IS SOUL 

* ^ /Pronto, fost — BMI) 

Ben f. King (Atco 6454) 


26 


PLAIN JANE 

(Crazy Cajun, Poker — BMI) 

B. J. Thomas fScep#er 12179) 


27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 


GROWN UP GAMES 

/Screen Gems, Columbia — BM/j 

Vic Dana (Dolton 326) 

BACK IN THE SAME OLD BAG 
AGAIN 

(Don— BMI] 

Bobby Bland (Duke 412) 

WHAT MAKES IT HAPPEN 

(Shapiro, Bernstein — ASCAPJ 

Tony Bennett (Columbia 43954) 

THE BEARS 

(Preacher — BMI) 

The Fastest Group Alive (Valiant 754) 

CHILDREN OF ST. MONICA 

/Let It Happen — BM/j 

Don Grady (Canterbury 501) 

YOUR EVER CHANGIN' MIND 

(Gil— BMI) 

TAKIN' THE BACK ROADS 

(Tridon — BM/j 

Trini Lopez (Reprise 536) 

PEAK OF LOVE 

/Chevis — BM/J 

Bobby McClure (Checker 1152) 

THAT'S LIFE 

(4 Slars-BMIJ 

96 TEARS 

(Comeo Parkway — BM/J 

Big Moybelle (Rojac 112) 

FULL MEASURE 

(Tailhlul Virtue — BM/J 

Lovin' Spoonful (Kama Sutra 219) 

NASTY 

(Saturday — BM/J 

Richard & The Young Lions 
(Philips 40414) 

SIT DOWN. I THINK I LOVE 
YOU 

/Screen Gems, Columbia — BM/J 

Mojo Men (Reprise 539) 

LOVE YOU so MUCH 

New Colony Six 


70 SOUL SISTER 

•4^ (Chekaway — BMI) 

Four Gents (HBR 509) 

4Q LITTLE WHITE LIES 

(Bregmon, Vocco, Conn — ASCAP) 

Motley Blues Band (Scepter 12177) 

41 WHY DO YOU WANT TO 
^ ' HURT THE ONE YOU LOVE 

/ Johnny R /vers — BM / j 
Marvel ios (Loma 2061) 

47 I'M GONNA MAKE YOU 

love me 

/Screen Gems, Co/umb/o — BM/j 
Shadows Of Knight (Dunwich 141) 

4'5 AIN'T NO SOUL IN THESE 
OLE SHOES 

IT M— BMI) 

Major Lance (Okeh 7266) 

44 YOU DON'T HAVE TO SAY 
**** YOU LOVE ME 

(Miller— ASCAP) 

Arthur Pysock (Verve 10470) 

45 CATCH ME IN THE MEADOW 

(Kama Sufra Music — BM/J 

Trade Winds (Kama Sutra 214} 

Afx I CAN'T PLEASE YOU 

//ronhorn — BM/j 

Jimmy Robbins (Jerhart 207) 

47 SWEETEST ONE 

(Polaris, Melbridge — BM/J 
Metros (RCA Victor 47-8994} 

40 GRITS AND CORN BREAD 

/Pure Soul, Keyman — BM/j 
Soul Runners (Mo Soul 101) 

4Q THE HABIT OF LOVING YOU 

(Leigh— ASCAP) 

Nino Tempo & April Stevens 
(White Whale 241) 

5f| MIDNIGHT HOUR 

(East, Cotillion— BMI) 

Kit & Outlaws (Philips 40420) 


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American Cable & Radio System 

An ITT Associate 

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ITO BE BILLED) PEER-SOUTHERN, NEW YORK 

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AMSTERDAM, AUCKLAND, BUENOS AIRES, BARCELONA, BOGOTA, HAMBURG 
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DATE 


12 / 26 /£.a 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


12 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


13 



• best bet B+ very good B good C+ fair C mediocre 

only those records best suited for commercial use are reviewed by Cash Box 


■IlilllliilllH 


Of the Week 


BRING IT UP (2:45) [Dynatone, BMI — Brown, Jones] 

JAMES BROWN & FAMOUS FLAMES (King 6071) 

The innumerable followers of “Soul Brother No. 1” should come out 
strong for this latest effort by Brown and his powerhouse group. The 
side is tabbed “Bring It Up” and it’s a throbbing, soulfilled shouter 
in the finest James Brown tradition. “B” side information was not avail- 
able at press time. 

OUR WINTER LOVE (2:17) [Cramart, BMI— Tubert, Cowell] 
WARM (2:15) [Fisher, ASCAP — Krontes, Jacobson] 

THE LETTERMEN (Capitol 5813) 

All those lovers, of all ages, should have their hearts warmed with 
this latest side from the Lettermen. The top lid is “Our Winter Love,” 
as gentle a romancer as there is. The sweeping, string filled “Warm” 
is more sounds in the same bag. 


Newcomer Picks 


GO WHERE YOU WANNA GO (2:15) [Trousdale, BMI— Philips] 
TOO POOR TO DIE (2:27) [Rivers, BMI — Hutchison, Gordon] 

THE 5th DIMENSION (Soul City 753) 

The 5th Dimension (three guys and two girls) do this tune from the 
Mamas and Papas catalog with a driving ferocity that should get it 
spun and sold. “Go Where You Wanna Go” is the lid’s title and the pow- 
erful harmonies and throbbing, engulfing ork backing makes this a 
must play item. “Too Poor To Die,” is a solid, soulful affair. 


THE DOLPHINS (3:51) [Third Story, Coconut Grove, BMI — Neil] 
BADI-DA (3:00) [Third Story, Cocoanut Grove, BMI — Neal] 

FRED NEIL (Capitol 5786)) 

The deep, melodic, rhythmic, blues feel of Fred Neil should spread 
and wide based on this groovy outing titled “The Dolphins.” The tune 
is a multi-paced, haunting, drawn out item with Neil giving a husky, 
powerful reading to his winding lyric. “Badi-Da” is a real funky outing. 


THE PLAYGROUND (3:00) [Gallico, BMI— Cooper, Catana] 
WHAT’S ONE MORE TEAR (2:13) [Gallico, BMI— Cooper, Catana] 
BARBARA COOPER (RCA Victor 9048) 

New to the scene lark Barbara Cooper should have a click on her 
hands with this haunting lid tabbed “The Playground.” The infectiously 
arranged sound smoothly sweeps behind the songstress’ building reading 
of the meaningful ditty. “What’s One More Tear” is an effective me- 
dium-paced outing. 


BALLAD OF WALTER WART (Brrriggett) (2:20) 

[Guard, BMI— Smith] 

THORNDIKE PICKLEDISH CHOIR (MTA 114) 

This very cute ditty is a ballad concerning the life of a freaky frog 
named Walter Wart. Delightful romp is likely to put the Thorndike 
Pickledish Choir on the top. No information availavle on the flip at this 
time. 


Best Bets 


NEW WAVE (Canterbury 503) 

• WHERE DO WE GO FROM 
HERE (2:25) [Handratoone, 
BMI — Ander, King] Chamber music 
background for thin, reedy vocal. 
This offering is a novelty which 
could catch on. A very interesting 
item indeed. 

(B-k) NOT FROM YOU (2:10) 
[Handratoone, BMI — Ander, 
King] Enchanted island effect pro- 
duced by instrumental arrangement 
Cool, clear vocal. 


MIGHTY SAM (Amy 973) 

I ® I’M A MAN (3:02) [Papa 

i Don, Sunalee, BMI — Oldham, 

j Penn, Hinton] Soulful, gentle R & B 
I offering Soft, lilting melody could lift 
I this one up the chart ladder. 

^ (B-J-) GEORGIA PINES (2:37) 

^ [Unart, Shu-fin, BMI — Buie, 

f ..-L ikins] 'Wailing, mournful R & B lid. 


P. J. PROBY (Liberty 55936) 

• NIKI HOEKY (2:35) [Nova- 
lene, BMI — P. Vegas, L. 
Vegas, Ford] Thumping, rocking of- 
fering with steady, insistent beat. 
Heavy, swaying effect. Might find 
popularity with a wide audience. 

(B+) GOOD THINGS ARE COM- 
ING MY WAY (2:20) [Met- 
ric, BMI — Legault] Sinuous, winding 
melody on this rock outing. 


THE SATELLITES (Parrot 313) 

• BODACIOUS (2:27) [Feather, 
BMI — Gorlock, Gillis] Funky, 
tub-thumping instrumental. Insinuat- 
ing rhythm. May see a good deal of 
sales action. 

(B-K) EL SAN JUAN (1:50) 
[Feather, BMI — Gorlock, 
Gillis Mellow Latin instrumental. 




iiiiil 





TED FORD (Gaye 3034) 

• HOLD ON TO THE KEY 

(2:08) [Low-Budd, BMI — 

Ford, Spears] Swinging R & B lid 
with brassy arrangement backing 
vocal. Could be a large hit. 

(B-h) YOU DON’T LOVE ME 

(2:40) [Low-Budd, BMI — 

Ford, Spears] Blues-drenched R & B 
workout. Mournful, soulful quality. 


DEARLY BELOVED 
• WAIT TILL THE MORN- 
ING (1:59) [Knob Hill, BMI 
—Walker] Breezy, easy-going rock 
item. Persuasive beat, catchy melody. 
Might be a solid chart contender. 


(B-h) YOU AIN’T GONNA DO 
WHAT YOU DID TO HIM 
TO ME (1:50) [Knob Hill, BMI — 
Freiser] Pounding, steady, medium- 
paced rock effort. 


JOLLY GREEN GIANTS 
(Redcoat 101) 


• BUSY BODY (2:04) [Low- 
ery, BMI — Johnson] Fast- 

moving, hard-driving rock outing. 
Could score big with rock-oriented 
teens. Frenetic rhythm suited to fran- 
tic dancing. 

(B-k) CAUGHT YOU REDHAND- 
ED (2:17) [Pulsation, BMI — 
Anderson] Shimmering, winding rock 
effort. 


VAL DOONICAN (Press 5008) 

• WHAT WOULD I BE (2:25) 
[Partita, BMI — Trent] Grace- 
ful, sliding melody line. Lush string 
arrangement backs up vocal. This 
one could be a big winner. 

(B-h) GENTLE MARY (2:37) 
[Painted Desert, BMI — Sharp] 
C & W-flavored lid. Strong, singable 
melody. 


THE JOHNNY MANN SINGERS 
(Liberty 55938) 

• A JOYFUL NOISE (2:34) 
[Churchill, BMI — Brand, 
Nassau] From the Broadway musical 
“A Joyful Noise,” this effort is a 
rousing, ringing song. Could hit big 
with followers of the show and the 
listening public in general. 

(B-h) WHITHER THOU GOEST 
(3:00) [Churchill, BMI — 
Brand, Nassau] Tender love song 
from the same show. 


TOMMY FINCH (Cobra 1000) 

• STREET WITHOUT JOY Pt. 
1 (3:15) [Nacynbar, BMI — R. 

Finch] This effort concerns the war in 
Viet Nam. Paints a sad picture of war 
scenes. This one might prove a top- 
ical success. 

(B-f) STREET WITHOUT JOY Pt. 

2(3:18) [Nacynbar, BMI — R. 
Finch] More of same over here. 

VIKKI CARR (Liberty 55937) 

• UNTIL TODAY (2:48) 
[Churchill, BMI — Brand, 

Nassau] Lyrical vocal from the Broad- 
way musical “A Joyful Noise.” Could 
ride on wave of popularity high up 
on the charts. 

(B-f) NOW I KNOW THE FEEL- 
ING (2:27) [Duchess, BMI — 
Barros, Spencer, Lyra] Slender, 
breathless vocal from the same show. 

KAREN SUE (United Artists 50088) 

e WILD, WILD ROSES (2:33) 
[United Artists, Pavanne, 
ASCAP — Stanton, Psalidas, Badale] 
Wailing, soulful rock outing with a 
heavy, thumping beat. This deck 
could very well see lots of chart 
action. 


(B-h) NOBODY LOVES A LOSER 
(2:17) [United Artists, Pav- 
anne, ASCAP — Badale, Simon] Sad, 
slow-paced rock ballad with chirping 
arrangement backing up the vocal. 

THE CHARLES RANDOLPH 
GREAN SOUNDE (Dot 16982) 

• PETER AND THE WOLF 
(2:00) [Sun- Vine, BMI] Rock 

version of classical air. Melody 
emerges intact and rhythm back- 
ground adds spice to the effort. Might 
be a very popular instrumental in- 
deed. 

(B-h) THEME FROM “STAR 
TREK” (2:14) [Bruin, BMI— 
Courage] Organ version of TV theme. 

AESOPS FABLES (Atco 6453) 

« HIDIN’ MY LOVE (3:15) 

[Pronto, Lou Carl, BMI — Bot- 
tari, Columbe] Slow, deliberate, care- 
fully delivered vocal. The workout 
could break out. 

(B-f) I’VE GOT TROUBLES (2:35) 
[Pronto, Lou Carl, BMI — -Bot- 
tari] Jumping, rhythmic rock effort. 

TERRY & THE TOPICS 
(Coral 62509) 

• JUST A GIGOLO (2:53) 
[DeSylva Brown & Hender- 
son, Alamo, ASCAP — Caesar, Casuc- 
ci] Rock version of pop standard. In- 
tense vocal blended with thumping in- 
strumental arrangement. Might prove 
to be a mover. 

(B-f) WHERE’S MY PUSSYCAT 
(2:33) [Champion, BMI — Mer- 
lino] Shuffling, guitar-picking rock 
outing. 

mTrLENE DIETRICH 
(Decca 32076) 

• THIS WORLD OF OURS 
(2:25) [Northern, ASCAP — 

Debout, Colpet, Harrison] Husky, re- 
ligious effort. Dietrich magic could 
make this one happen. Keep an eye 
on it. 

(B-f) CANDLES GLOWING (2:36) 
[Gil-A-Rex, BMI— Olias, Bad- 
er, Harrison] Soft, slow Christmas 
vocal. 

SMALL FACES (RCA Victor 9055) 

• MY MIND’S EYE (2:02) 
[Miller, ASCAP — Marriott, 

Lane] Lilting, infectious melody with 
a fresh sound. This workout might 
claim a strong foothold on the charts. 
(B-f) I CAN’T DANCE WITH YOU 
(3:15) [Leading, ASCAP — 
Marriott, Lane] Tenacious, slinky rock 
offering. 

CHIP AND DAVE TRIO 

(Decca 32073) 

• WHO’S TO SAY (2:48) 
[Summerwind, Champion, BMI 

— Immer] Breezy, bright, melodic 
rocker. Soft, fluid arrangement. 
Might be a chart-climber. Watch this 
one. 

(B-f) EVERYBODY’S LAUGHING 
(2:20) [Summerwind, Cham- 
pion, BMI — Immer] Rollicking, frisky 
rock lid. 


MARTI SHANNON 
(RCA Victor 9053) 

• THERE’S LOVIN’ TO DO 
(2:44) [Northern, BMI — 
Keller] Frail, fragile vocal which has 
style and verve. Could very well be 
a chart item on the basis of its slid- 
ing melodic effects. 

(B-f) ON YOUR WAY (2:21) 
[Faithful Virtue, BMI — 
Harden] Will-o’-the-wisp quality 
creates unique sound on this outing. 


14 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 




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Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


15 







flLENT ON STAGE 


FOUR TOPS 

CATHY CARR, CHARLIE BARNET 


NEW 't¥0£K — Last week’s opening- 
night at Basin Street East was a 
truly diversified bill of fare. The top 
of the bill was filled, and was surely 
superbly filled, by Motown’s Four 
Tops. The stylish quartet is a fine 
representative of contemporary rec- 
ords artists at their best. They sing 
their hits and make them sound like 
the records that you heard on the 
radio. They sing- standards with a 
fine practiced harmony and they work 
on stage with a polish that bespeaks 
long hours with a choreographer and 
even longer hours of pure practice. 
Not only however do the Tops enter- 
tain you but they get the audience 
to entertain itself, via handclapping, 
singing and shouting. This is easy 
enough at a college or teen concert, 
but at a top flight, top price N.Y. 
nitery it’s something else. 

The entire body of Motown artists 


have shown themselves to be practi- 
tioners of the art of show business, 
and the Four Tops are among the 
best of the best. 

After an extensive absence from 
the club scene, lark Cathy Carr made 
her comeback debut and brought fond 
smiles to the faces of the throng. Her 
while back smash record “Ivory 
Tower’’ was remembered by one and 
all and Cathy’s news of her returning 
to the record as well as the club 
scene was cheered. Her new act is 
certainly pleasant, although, as with 
any new enterprise, it needs to get 
the corners smoothed over. 

Charley Barnet and his big band 
provided the musical backing and the 
40ish sound was enjoyable as well as 
nostalgic. Barnet has a solid group of 
musicians gathered together for the 
stay and their sound should be en- 
joyed by young and old alike. 


JOAN BAEZ 


SURE 
SHOTS 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

The Cosh Box "Sure Shots" highlight records which reports from retail dealers throughout the 
nation indicate are already beginning to sell quantity or else give every indication of doing so 


HELLO HELLO 

SOPWITH CAMEL Kama Sutra 217 

GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME 

TOM JONES Parrot 40009 

KNIGHT IN RUSTY ARMOUR * 

PETER & GORDON Copitol 5808 

MUSIC TO WATCH GIRLS BY * 

BOB CREWE GENERATION DynoVoice 229 

HEY LEROY, YOUR MAMA'S CALLING YOU 

JIMMY CASTOR Smash 2069 

PRETTY BALLERINA 

LEFT BANKE Smash 2074 

I DIG GIRLS 

J. J. JACKSON Callo 125 



DEAD END STREET 

KINKS Reprise 540 



BARBARA 


HOLLYWOOD: A pair of silver lin- 
ings to the dark clouds over Delano 
were the two benefit concerts offered 
here last week by Miss Baez under 
the sponsorship of KRLA and Doug 
Weston. With 4000 farm workers 
— continuing their struggle on the 
plains surrounding Delano, Calif, 
(possibly the last great battleground 
for unionization in our land), this ur- 
ban folk laureate who sings of the 
contradictions of peace and war, jus- 
tice and injustice and God and coun- 
try, filled the Santa Monica Civic au- 
ditorium with warmth, beauty and 
simple eloquence. 

It was fitting that her opening song 
should concern itself with the “Plane 
Wreck at Los Gatos,” Woodie Guth- 
rie’s polemic dedication to our mi- 
grant farm hands (“is this the best 
way we can raise our good orchards — 
is this the best way we can grow our 
good crops?”). Other tunes, part of 
the contemporary folk scene but 
steeped in the tradition of Ledbetter, 
Robeson Hays and Seeger, included 
Phil Oakes’ “There But For Fortune,” 


NEW YORK — Before a devoted 
throng of young admirers, Eric An- 
derson, Vanguard recording artist, 
backed by an electric bass guitar, a 
piano, and drums, created his own 
special brand of magic at the Cafe 
Au Go Go last week (17). Singing a 
group of folk songs, all but one of 
which (“Come Back Baby,” by Dave 
van Ronk) he wrote, the fei'tile song 
writing ability of the artist was dra- 
matically brought home to his audi- 
ence. 

The hauntingly beautiful melody, 
“I Shall Go Unbounded,” was sung 
early in the program. The very next 
tune, however, “The Hustler,” pro- 
duced the only false note of the eve- 
ning. The delicate, fragile musical 
texture of the song was invaded by 


Dylan’s “All Over Now Baby Blue” 
and “Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” and 
an exquisite Donovan ballad (Miss 
Baez could not recall its title). All 
were presented with compelling con- 
viction and classic purity. A warm-up 
group called the Nitty Gritty Dirt 
Band, six uninhibited boys utilizing- 
washboards, banjos, aluminum tubs 
and mandolins delighted the sell-out 
crowd with a version of the kiddie 
evei'green “Teddy Bear’s Picnic,” fus- 
ing Blue Grass to Spike Jones. It’s 
a highly visual act which bears 
watching. But it’s questionable 
whether they can be quite as spec- 
tacular on disks. 

In all. Miss Baez raised $17,500 for 
the Delano farm workers at the Santa 
Monica — more than double the figure 
that Seeger managed a year ago here 
with a single concert for the same 
cause. Just a srimption of the funds 
needed for what is expected to be a 
protracted and costly conflict. But, 
not unlike Miss Baez’ own Institute 
for the Study of Non-Violence, it is — 
at least — a beginning. 


a harsh, strident drum-beat, which, 
with its “hard rock” sound, was to- 
tally out of place. The infernal drums 
also detracted from the charm of the 
lyrics of “Sixteen- Year Grudge,” 
a whimsical tale of adolescent rebel- 
lion. 

Anderson, in addition to “Sixteen- 
Year-Grudge,” performed three tunes 
written since the release of his last 
album: “I Ain’t Broken-Hearted, 

Mama”; “It’s A Far Cry From 
Heaven But A Short Cry From 
Home”; and “Just A Little Some- 
thing.” 

The singer ended his regular pro- 
gram with the rousing, rocking blues 
effort, “That’s Alright, Mama.” The 
crowd cheered madly and implored 
Anderson to continue. 


HOLLYWOOD — Every day somebody 
or other is discovering Barbara Mc- 
Nair. It has been going on for at 
least nine years. One of these days 
(or nights) it’s going to happen for 
keeps. Soon (maybe not tomorrow but 
soon, as the song goes) that elusive 
unreachable star will be within her 
orbit. 

Based on opening night perform- 
ance here at the Westside room at the 
Century Plaza she deserves the ac- 
colade that Mel Torme accorded her 
several years back — “one of the 
world’s all time feminine girl woman 
female singers.” She is obviously a 
woman and unquestionably a singer. 
And she delights in exhibiting her fine 
form in both spheres with at least 
a dozen show stoppers in her 45 min- 
ute stint. Opener (“Nothing Can Stop 
i Me Now”) is the keynote address for 
: an act which encompasses a number 
: of off beat titles, special material and 
! a smattering of standards offered en- 
gagingly, intensely (but without the 
Stanislavsky or “method school” ap- 


i HOLLYWOOD — No matter how you 
1 mis-spell it, the Young Gyants are a 
' bantam sized group of youthful mu- 
sicians with megalosaurian potential. 
Fronted by reed man John d’Andrea, 
this septet (two reed, two brass and 
I three rhythm) manage to fuse the big 
band sound of the forties convinc- 
ingly to the neoteric roll of the ’60’s. 
Refreshingly, the band doesn’t just 
swing. It rocks. Tastefully, tunefully 
and with integrity. Mostly to titles 


McNAIR 

proach utilized by a number of her 
peers) and with electric assurance. 

Over a year since she has per- 
formed in her one time home town, 
the act is almost all new. One high- 
light is a series of sharp satirical 
take-offs on Pearl Bailey (“Tired”), 
Eartha Kitt (“Evil”), Jackie Mason ■ 

and Carol Channing (“Diamonds”). 
And another is the Ron Miller rouser 
“What A Day” from her recent “Here 
I Am” LP. Of this Miss McNair . 
fetchingly advises, “If you liked the ' 
song, it’s in my new Motown album. 

If you weren’t too crazy about it, re- 
member, there are eleven others.” 

Closer “I Had A Ball” could easily 
caption this revue. Comedian Bill Cos- 
by, who intro’d her to the celebrity 
packed assembly, said, “To know her 
or to hear her is to love her.” 

Credit conductor Coleridge Perkin- 
son for excellent arrangements and 
the Frankie Ortega orchestra for 
sparking the sizzling act. 

Show closes Jan. 1, which gives you 
only about a week to fall in love. 


which are current (“Monday Mon- 
day”, “Alfie,” “Paperback Writer,” 
“Boots Are Made For Walkin’ ”) with 
several contemporary treatments of 
more standard material (“Tangerine,” 
“Primrose Lane” and “Slaughter On 
10th Avenue”). 

Opening at the Chez was pre- 
ceded by richly deserved hoopla from 
mentor Bob Marcucci and flack David 
Mirisch with Dick Clark intro’ing the 
band to a star packed audience. 
Cameo-Parkway prexy A1 Rosenthaul 
flew from Philly for the event (host- 
ing a party for about 300 including , 
press, record distribs and personnel j 
and celebs) with Gyants’ initial 
Cameo-Parkway LP distributed to 
first nighters. Response to show was 
snontaneous — a standing ovation for 
the newly organized combo. 

Conceived by d’Andrea some 
months back, youngster charted the 
book and assembled studio musicians 
for the album. Like the TJB and other 
successful groups of recent vintage, 
it was followed by organizing a live 
replica for in-person appearances. 
D’Andrea, who rather resembles TJB 
leader Herb Alpert, is a handsome 
as well as talented musician who, in 
the past two years, has solo’d as a 
singer on disks. He vocalizes here too 
(occasionally joined by guitarist 
Chuck Day and bassist Ron Brown) 
exhibiting a fine jazz feel. But he 
should borrow a track from Alpert 
and work at developing more precise 
and pointed patter between numbers. 


We’re LONG 


on 

Se^iie 




fe-yigjpLa ■ 




DearJaoX. the lot promptly 

Many thanks „otif ioation as I '"as xn 

my failPr® to s superb. 

a hurry, ’iovr service P ^ Customer 


TT 


ERIC ANDERSON 


THE YOUNG GYANTS 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


16 



AF Hiked Domestic, Global Sales In ’66 



illilUlllllllilllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllll^ 

NEW CHART 
ADDITIONS 

lllllilllllllliillllliiilllillllllllllllllllilllllliii 

NEW TOP 100 SINGLES 

*67— KNIGHT IN RUSTY ARMOUR 

Peter & Gordon (Capitol 5808) 

*75 — MUSIC TO WATCH GIRLS BY 

Bob Crewe Generation (DynoVoice 229) 

*84— HEY LEROY, YOUR MAMA'S 
CALLING YOU 

Jimmy Castor (Smash 2069) 

*87— PRETTY BALLERINA 

Left Banke (Smash 2074) 

*88 — 1 DIG GIRLS 

J. J. Jackson (Calla 125) 

*89— DEAD END STREET 

Kinks (Reprise S40) 

94— LOVE ME 

Bobby Hebb (Philips 40421) 

96 — MERCY, MERCY 

Cannonball Adderly (Capitol 5798) 

98— OH YEAH! 

Joe Cuba Sextet (Tico 490) 

100— AT THE PARTY 

Hector Rivera (Barry 1010) 

100 — CONSTANT RAIN 

Sergio Mendes (A&M 825) 

100— WALK WITH FAITH IN 

YOUR HEART 

Bachelors (London 20018) 

NEW TOP 100 ALBUMS 

*74 — RENAISSANCE 

Association (Valiant VLM VLS 5004) 

*86— MUSIC OF HAWAII 

H”nry Mancini 

(RCA Victor LPM LSP 3713) 

*88 — 1 DO! 1 DO! 

Original Broadway Cast 
(RCA Victor LOC LSO 1128) 

92 — ALFIE 

Billy Vaughn (Dot DLP 3751 DIP 25751) 

93— WISH ME A RAINBOW 

Gunter Kallmann 
(4 Corners SCL/SCS 4235) 

94 — COLLECTIONS 

Young Rascals (Atlantic M,S 8134) 

97— BUDDY RICH: SWINGIN' NEW 

BIG BAND 

(Pacific Jazz PJ 101 13 ST 20113) 

NEW TO TOP 50 IN R&B LOCATIONS 

26 — ANOTHER NIGHT 

Dionne Warwick (Szepter 12181) 

39 — TAKE ME FOR A LITTLE 

WHILE 

Pattie LaBelle & The Bluebelles 
(Atlantic 2373) 

43— CROSS CUT SAW 

Albert King (Stax 201) 

46— COME BY HERE 

Inez & Charlie Pox (Musicor 1201) 

48 — EVERYBODY DANCE NOW 

Soul City (Goodtime 801) 

. - . . - 


NEW YORK — Audio Fidelity and its 
affiliated labels showed strong domes- 
tic and foreign sales for 1966, Her- 
man Gimbel, president, has reported 
to his board of directors. Interim 
reports by Alexander Grant & Co., 
accountants and auditors for the com- 
pany, showed a domestic sales in- 
crease of 30% over the comparable 
period for 1965 and a 36% gain in 
sales by Audio Fidelity Records’ for- 
eign licensees. The Canadian opera- 
tion reflected an increase of 22% over 
last year. The labels include Karate, 
Little Darlin,’ Audio Rarities and 
Kinor. 

Since Gimbel assumed control of 
Audio Fidelity, the company has been 
undergoing a vigorous expansion pio- 
gram. Auffio Fidelity entered the pop 
market with its Karate label which, 
within a short period of time, enjoyed 
its first hit single, “Juanita Banana”; 
this was soon followed by the 
“Juanita Banana” album. Since its 
inception in the middle of 1966, the 
Little Darlin’ label singles and LP 
releases have appeared on the country 
and western charts consistently. The 
Audio Fidelity label itself added 


Ken Lutfman Opens 
Indie Promo Firm 

NEW YORK — Ken Luttman Enter- 
prises, an indie promo service, has 
been formed. Luttman, a 15-year vet 
in sales and promo, said he would ap- 
proach this area with a limited num- 
ber of accounts in order to give a 
maximum of effort in obtaining air- 
play and sales. He will contact major 
radio stations and one-stops in the 
New York, Philadelphia, Hartford 
and Boston markets. He was national 
promo manager for United Artists 
Records and, for the past five years, 
district singles promo manager for 
Capitol Records. His firm operates out 
of 20 Balmoral Crescent in White 
Plains, New York. 


^iiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiniininiininintiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiMMiitiiiiiiiiMim: 

I ALL THAT I AM i 

i ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR I 

I Gladys Mosle, Ue. = 

i SPINOUT i 

i ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR = 

I Gladys Mosle, Ine. = 

i A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A FOOL i 

= (MANHA DeCARNIVAL) 1 

i JACK JONES KAPP I 

I Ross Jongnlekel, Inc. i 

i LOOK WHAT YOU'VE DONE 5 

I POZO SECO SINGERS COLUMBIA | 

I Noma Music, Inc. = 

= Pocket Full of Tones S 

= I JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO I 
= WITH MYSELF 1 

i DIONNE WARWICK SCEPTER i 

I Bslinda (Canada) Ltd./floartet Mosle, Int. = 

= (WHEN SHE NEEDS GOOD LOVIN') i 

= SHE COMES TO ME i 

I THE CHICAGO LOOP DYNO VOICE = 

I Tiger Music, inc. i 

i BIG BLACK SMOKE I 

I THE KINKS REPRISE! 

E Noma Music, inc. = 

I Mondvies Music, Inc. = 

= DEAD END STREET I 

I THE KINKS REPRISE! 

E Noma Music, Inc. i 

i Mondvies Music, Inc. E 

E LET THE GOOD TIMES IN E 

i DEAN MARTIN REPRISE 1 

! Noma Music, Inc. E 

= Smooth Music, Ine. E 

E HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE I 

I ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR i 

- Elvis Presley Music, Inc. = 

I ALL I SEE IS YOU I 

i DUSTY SPRINGFIELD PHILIPS i 

5 Anne-Raehel Music Corporation = 

E YOU ARE SHE I 

I CHAD & JEREMY COLUMBIA i 

= Noma Music. Ine. = 

i I WONT CRY I 

I CHAD & JEREMY COLUMBIA = 

i Noma Music. Ine. = 

E ANOTHER TEAR FALLS i 

I WALKER BROS. SMASH i 

s Anne-Rachel Music Corporation = 

I SADDEST NIGHT IN THE WORLD i 

I WALKER BROS SMASH I 

= BIgtop Records, Inc. = 

i ALL THE LOVE IN THE WORLD i 

I CONNIE FRANCIS MGM I 

i Anne-Saehel Music Corporation = 

1 SHE'U RETURN IT I 

I ERIC BURDON & ANIMALS MGM i 

E Slamlna Mosle, Ine. r 

I THE RIGHT ONE IS LEFT I 

I CILLA BLACK CAPITOL I 

E Hill & Range Songs, Ine. § 

I THE ABERBACH GROUP | 

I 1619 Broadway, New Ytrli, N. V. | 

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about sixty new LP’s during the past 
year. It released 15 new LP’s in its 
classical line, including a deluxe 
seven-record boxed set of the nine 
Beethoven Symphonies, and a two- 
record set of Beethoven’s 8th and 9th 
Symphonies. 

Gimbel also introduced exciting 
new packaging concepts for many of 
Audio Fidelity’s new albums which 
were enthusiastically received by 
Audio Fidelity’s distributors. Carl 
Shaw, vice president of the company, 
just returned from the west coast 
after negotiating for a new jazz line, 
details of which will be announced at 
a later date. 

Gimbel’s plans for 1967 are to con- 
tinue the company’s expansion pro- 
gram by acquiring new artists, new 
repertoire and imaginative merchan- 
dising. 

Three New Artists 

AF has inked three new artists, 
Tony Tanner, who appeared in “Half 
a Sixpence” and the movie version 
of “Stop the World,” The Four Aces 
and Vincent Lopez. They will appear 
in LP’s due early next year. 


Queen Elizabeth, Wilson 
Praise Legacy's 'Kennedy' 

NEW YORK — High praise for the 
CBS Legacy Collection set, “John 
Fitzgeralcl Kennedy ... As We Re- 
member Him,” has come from Brit- 
ain’s Queen Elizabeth and Prime 
Minister Harold Wilson, who were re- 
cently presented copies of the release. 

Spokesmen indicated that the 
! Queen had greatly enjoyed looking 
j at the book and was eager to listen 
I to the records. In a letter to Kenneth 
i Glancy, managing director of CBS 
■ Records, Ltd., in England, Prime 
1 Minister Wilson commented on the 
illustrated book and two-record set: 
“I am extremely honored and pleased 
to receive these and shall keep them 
I with great pride with my own collec- 
I tion.” 

A biography of President Kennedy 
I from childhood to the White House, 
! “As We Remember Him” is the larg- 
I est and most successful Legacy Col- 
! lection publication ever released. The 
j set contains two LP’s and a 241-page 
book which features letters and docu- 
i ments written by members of the 
I Kennedy family and by close personal 
friends and political associates of 
! John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Much of 
{ the recorded material was taped espe- 
i dally for this set, and many of the 
photographs contained in the book 
, were previously unpublished. 

The Queen and Pidme Minister 
were also presented with copies of the 
other eight CBS Legacy Collection 
publications. These include “First 
Performance — Lincoln Center for the 
Performing Arts, Philharmonic Hall, 
September 23, 1962,” “The Badmen,” 
“The Revolution,” “The Confeder- 
acy,” “The Union,” “Mexico,” “The 
Mormon Pioneers” and, most recently, 
“The Irish Uprising/1916-1922.” 


Atlantic Music Buys 
Charlie Parker Tunes 

NEW YORK — The Charles Parker 
estate has sold its entire holdings of 
24 Charlie Parker songs to Michael 
H. Goldsen’s Atlantic Music Corpora- 
tion. Catalog contains his instru- 
mentals which have appeared on his 
Verve recordings and are jazz classics 
throughout the world. 

These twenty-four songs are added 
to Goldsen’s other six Charlie Parker 
compositions which include such tunes 
as “Moose The Mooche,” “Yardbird 
Suite,” “Scrapple From The Apple,” 
j “Dewey Square,” “Ornithology” and 
j “Confirmation.” 

j New recordings will be issued on 
; the recently acquired compositions in 
I addition to publishing a special folio 
! edition. 


HARM Names Committee To 

PHILADELPHIA — The committee 
for nominations for 1966 NARM 
(rack-jobber) awards has been se- 
lected, reports John Billinis, presi- 
dent. This committee will be respon- 
sible for submitting the nominees for 
the 1966 NARM Awards. The final 
voting on the awards is done by the 
record merchandisers members of 
NARM (rack jobbers). The awards 
will be presented at the annual 
NARM awards banquet, which will 
be held Thursday evening, March 9, 
in the Los Angeles Ballroom of the 
Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, 
as the highlight of the social sched- 
ule of the association’s ninth annual 
convention. The Convention convenes 
in Los Angeles on March 5. 

Members of the committee which 
will submit nominees for eighteen 
categories in which awards will be 
presented, are as follows: Ben Bartel 
(Cal Raks, Los Angeles, California) ; 
Pat Moreland (Record Service Com- 
pany, Los Angeles, California) ; Lee 
Steen (Recordwagon, Woburn, 
Mass.) ; John T. Edgerton (Pic-A- 
Tune, Emeryville, California) ; Stan- 
ley Jaffe (Consolidated Distributors, 
Seattle, Washington) ; Manuel 
Swatez (J. L. Marsh Company, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota) ; George Souvall 
(Arizona Sundries, Phoenix, Ari- 
zona) ; Sam N. Morrison (Knox 
Record Rack, Knoxville, Tennessee) ; 
Larry M. Rosmarin (Record Dis- 
tributing Company, Houston, Texas) ; 
Jack Silverman (Major Record Serv- 
ice, Des Moines, Iowa) ; Charles 
Murray (Stark Record Service, 


Select Awards Nominees 

Cleveland, Ohio) ; Richard Stultz 
(Record Supply (Ilompany, Orlando, 
Florida) ; Fred Traub (Disco, Boston. 
Mass.) ; Jay Jacobs (District Records, 
Washington, D.C.) ; David Press (D 
and H Distributing Company, Harris- 
burg, Penna.) ; Harold Rietz (Record 
City Record Racks, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin) ; Vic Faraci (Musical Isle 
Record Corp., Chicago, Illinois) ; 
Jack Grossman (Merco Enterprises, 
Melville, New York); Jack Geldbart 
(L and F Record Service, Atlanta, 
Georgia) ; and Carl Glaser (Disceries, 
Inc., Buffalo, New York). 

The categories in which NARM 
Awards will be presented include 
Best-Selling Hit Single Record; Best 
Selling Album; Best Selling Movie 
Sound Track; Best Selling Comedy 
Album; Best Selling Male Vocalist; 
Best Selling Female Vocalist; Best 
Selling Country and Western Artist; 
Best Selling Folk Artist; Most 
Promising Male Vocalist; Most Prom- 
ising Female Vocalist; Best Selling 
Vocal Group; Best Selling Instru- 
mental Group ; Best Selling Orches- 
tra; Best Selling Children’s Line; 
and Best Selling Economy Product. 

Upon finalization of the Awards 
Ballot, when the selection committee 
has prepared the choices which will 
appear on the final ballot, the ballots 
will be sent to the record merchan- 
diser members of NARM, and will be 
returned to an independent account- 
ing firm, which will tabulate the re- 
turns. No prior announcement of the 
winners is made until the evening of 
the Awards Banquet. 




Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


18 







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W^SSStsSs 


Arthur 

Prysock 

When he sings the song, 
it stays sung. 

And when he sings 
a hit like 

You don't 
have to 
say you 
love me 

VK-10470 

you know it's gonna 

be a hit for 

many charts to come! 

From his album 

ART & SOUL 


V/ V6-5009 



Verve Records is a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 


RAMBLINGS 







William Kermit Smith tells us that 
the Velvet Underground & Nico will 
work a l-week gig at Montreal’s 
“EXrO-67,” from Jan. 16th to 23r(l. 
During this stay they will tape an 
Ed Sullivan TV'^’er. The group is also 
scheduled for a 30-day European tour 
to begin in mid-Mar. This tour will 
be promoted by Giorgio Gomelsky. 
Robert Wace, and William Kermit 
Smith. 

Steve Paul’s The Scene has booked 
the Velvet Underground and Nico. 
As an added attraction, Andy Warhol 
will make a film in the West 46th St. 



12th. The lark has been spending a lot 
of time of late in Paris. 

Debbie Lori Kaye, Columbia’s 
young Canadian lark who made such 
a big splash with Bob Hope at the 
CNE, has been signed to a manage- 
ment contract with Saul Holiflf, man- 
ager of Johnny Cash and the Statler 
Bros. She has just been booked to do 
a Tommy Hunter Show with her first 
exposure due early in 1967. 

Vaughn Monroe opens at the Rain- 
bow Grill, Dec. 26. 

Joey Dee brings his new combo into 
Trude Heller’s Village nitery Dec. 
26th for a debut engagement of 





HOLMES, McFADDEN DEBBIE LORI KAYE ERIC ANDERSON 

& COMMANDERS 


nitery at the same time. So, if you 
want to be in pictures. . . . you 
know where to go. Even if you don’t 
particularly care to be immortalized 
on celluloid, there’s a lot happening 
at The Scene with groups like the 
Young Rascals, the Youngbloods, and 
the Free Spirits appearing weekly in 
“dance/concerts.” 

Carl Holmes and the Commanders 
with Ruth McFadden, headliners at 
Cheetah’s New York and Chicago 
openings, begin a 2-week engage- 
ment at Cheetah (53i'd and B’way) 
Dec. 22nd through Wed.. Jan. 4th. 
Sharing the Yuletide bill is Mike St. 
Shaw, who is being held over for an 
additional week. 

Eric Anderson is set for an up- 
coming concert at Town Hall. 

Billy Meschel of Hugo & Luigi, 
has noted that the David Garrick 
deck on Piccadilly of “Dear Mrs. 
Applebee’’ has been doing very well 
in England. The tune is out in the 
U.S. on the A&M label and was also 
done by Flip Cartridge for the Par- 
rott label. 

“In My Life” the latest Judy Col- 
lins LP is “sensational, it’s breaking 
out all over; it’s going Folk, Pop, 
Jazz, and Good Music,” according to 
Elektra’s Steve Harris. Steve also 
notes that Tom Paxton is soon to 
make his Carnegie Hall debut. 

Way up in Rochester, N.Yk, A1 
Cecere has gotten 2 singers named 
Timmy Chiles and Tony Pilitt^re. 
Timmy will be coming into New 
York during the Christmas week to 
cut his first single “Lonelv Tears” 
“Playmate.” Tony Pilittere’s deck is 
“You Wouldn’t Believe Me”/“It’s Not 
That Way.” Tony was formerly with 
the Wee-Four on the Nu-Sound 
label. 

Australian born Lana Cantrell will 
make her second appearance on the 
Ed Sullivan TV’er, Jan. 1st. She is 
scheduled for four such appearances 
this season. 

The Serendipity Singers are set for 
a Jan. 29th-Feb 4th tour of 9 schools 
in the Pennsylvania area. . . . the 
Four Fifths (Columbia) are set for 
Altman’s fashion show Dec. 28th. 
Their current release is “If You Still 
Love Me.” 

Del Serino has announced the sign- 
ing of the English Setters to Peer- 
Southern. They are a self contained 
umt and write their own material. 

Hush Dallas and Sal Lacanta just 
itopped by the Ramblings office. 

Gale Garnett, who sang her way to 
nr^TninsTice with “We’ll Sing In The 
returns to New York after 
- ’ Lw 1 - .s'waj’' hiatus to co-star with 
-A - ■■•er and Hal Buckley in the 
■ ' ■ ---Ain Krasna comedy, “Love 

i - P . ’.A , ’ scheduled to open Feb. 


3-weeks Billed as the New Starliters, 
Joey’s group will share the bandstand 
with the Scoundrels and singer Bertha 
Colbert. 

The Reprise single of songs from 
Irving Allen’s new Matt Helm ad- 
venture. “Murderers’ Row,” sung by 
Dean Martin, is being distributed to 
music stores across the nation for 
joint promotion with the Christmas 
play-dates for the Columbia Pictures 
release. The sides on the deck are: 
“I’m Not The Marrying Kind” and 
“Let The Good Times In.” 

Ravi Shankar is in the U.S. for con- 
certs. He was welcomed at a reception 
at the Asia House Dec. 20. On the 
21st, 22nd, and 23rd, he played com- 
pletely different concerts at Philhar- 
monic Hall. Shankar’s magnificent 
work with the sitar has had a great 
deal of influence on the modern day 
pop music scene. 

“All In Love”, the Jacques Urbont, 
Bruce Geller musical version of 
Sheridan’s “The Rivals”, was present- 
ed by Equity Theater players from 
December 2-18 at the Master Theater. 
The production is published by E. B. 
Marks. 

HOLLYWOOD: 

It’s not very often (if ever) that 
the L. A. Times devotes a full page 
to a new record label or dinner party. 
But that it did to Chisa Records’ bash 
last week at the former Leonard 
Firestone estate. The firm (encom- 
passing the talents of jazz trumpeter 
Hugh Masekela, vocalist Letta and 
groups such as the Zulus and Bwanas) 
brought together more than 300 so 
ciety, artist and musi''al luminaries 
to the home of Don and Molly Chap- 
pellet in Beverly Hills. This, for a 
private concert which turned out to 
be anything but private. 

The L. A. Times headlined it “The 
Party That Grew Until . . . ZOP! 
Affair began when Chisa’s g.m. and 
musical director Larry Spector was 
invited to bring some of the new 
label’s talents to the Chappellet's for 
dinner and music. It \'^'as to have 
been a rather simple affair — not more 
than 30 — but word leaked out and 
friends told friends — phones started 
ringing — and ZOP! We encountered, 
among many others, the Henry 
Fondas, Peter Fonda, Anne Baxter, 
Ted Feigan, Danny Davis, Bill Har- 
bach, David Crosby, Brandon De 
Wilde, Teri Thornton, Dinah Shore, 
Larry Bell (he flew in from N.Y. for 
the occasion) and Herbert Moss. 
Highlight of the evening wms Mase- 
kela (who has cut two albums for 
MGM ) and his quartet who performed 
in the living Chappellet room — a com- 
bination of tribal African tunes, gos- 
pel and rock wdth several recent chart 




titles. His version of “It’s Not Un- 
usual” is. If you haven’t already 
chanced upon his name, start re- 
hearsing it now. Chances are it could 
soon be as household as TJB, Zen and 
Sears-Roebuck. 

Another party this past week — a 
surprise one for Koppelman-Rubin’s 
Johnny Bond who was scheduled to 
leave for Philly this past Monday 
Affair was held at Martoni’s with 
many local jocks and west coast music 
men attending. But most surprised 
was the gang who planned the event. 
Bond has decided not to leave town 
after all. 


report their single (“Anyway You 
Want Me”) is No. 6 in St. Louis and 
top twenty in Seattle. . . . Rave re- 
views for the Mandala who appeared 
here at the Hullabaloo. L. A. Times 
writer Pete Johnson notes “an im- 
pressive armory of equipment, fresh- 
ness and ability . . . extraordinarily 
effective . . . one of the best re- 

hearsed groups ever to perform rock 
‘n’ roll.” Their initial single, pro- 
duced by Koppelman-Rubin, is “Op- 
portunity” — no label set at the mo- 
ment. 





SUN RAYS 


PAM FOURZON 


MANDALA 


Neil Diamond, appearing this week 
at the Hullabaloo, is putting together 
a rock n’roll package with famed en- 
terprenuer Sol Hurok — a tour of the 
Iron Curtain countries including Mos- 
cow. . . . RCA’s Jefferson Airplane 
set for a Dec. 28 concert date with 
the Beach Boys at the Cow Palace 
and a New Year’s eve appearance on 
NBC’s Bell Telephone Hour. . . . 

Righteous Bros, check into MGM this 
week for pre-recording sessions with 
Patricia Crowley and Mark Miller. 
Session is for the up-coming segment 
on “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies”, 
which marks the Duo’s acting debut. 

Fred Smith, former Mira manager, 
now heading Mo Soul, has a “bust- 
out” in “Grits and Cornbread” by the 
Soul Runners. Merrec promo man- 
ager Jimmy Mack reports single 
broke L. A. first. . . . 20th Century’s 
latest group is the David, a quintette 
of blond, long haired singer and in- 
strumentalists whose first single is 
titled “40 Miles” b/w “Bus Token 
Fare”. . . . Michele Lee’s next sin- 
gle for Columbia is “Wednesday’s 
Child” b/w “I Am Yours”. . . 

The Baja Marimba, set to co-star with 
Wayne Newton at Melodyland in 
Anaheim Jan. 17-22, were listed in 
last week’s CB as the No 1 Newcomer 
Band of ’66. . . . Don and the G"od- 
times, new regulars on the Dick 
Clark “Action” show, have started 
taping the January shows. . . . Ber- 
nard Yeszin, former art director for 
Motown and ass’t art directon for 
Liberty, has opened his own office — 
accounts include the Monkees, Uni- 
versal City Records and Double 
Shot — address is 3739 Multiview 
Drive in L. A. . . . John Andrea, 
leader of the Young Gyants, audition- 
ing for a part in the “Finian’s Rain- 
bow” flick. . . . Tower Records’ 

Sunrays also set for Disneyland book- 
ing through the new year. 

“West Coast Girl of the Week” is 
Glendale’s gift to the music world — 
an occasional red head and always 
attractive Pam Fourzon who is nres- 
ently working part time at KCOP and 
free lancing as an editorial writer 
for “Teen Set”, “Teen Screen” and 
“Soul”. Pam has been writing since 
she was five — has appeared in Dave 
Siegel’s “Blackouts of 1960” — and 
you’ll be eyeing her soon on NBC’s 
“The Dating Game”. She’s currently 
working on a screenplay and novel 
about Hollywood. ' 

Ruben Rodriguez and the Guadala- 
jara Kings headline the lounge of the 
Eden Roc in Miami through Jan. 
3rd — the Liberty group also contract- 
ed to appear at the Flamingo Hotel’s 
Driftwood Lounge in Vegas starting 
Jan. 26. . . . Liverpool Five, cur- 
rently in town for a charity show. 


HERE AND THERE: 

Philadelphia: Matty “Hum Dinger” 
Singer reports that he’s getting ac- 
tion on “I’ll Take Care Your Cares” 
by Frankie Laine and Tommy Roe’s 
“It’s A New Winter’s Day.” In the 
Blues bag, “Waiting On You” by 
B. B. King and “Two Ways To Skin 
A Cat” by Jimmy Reed are doing 
well. On Boom, “Skate Pt. 1” by- 
Dean Parrish is doing well. . . 

(New York) Angela Martin is sked’ed 
to do her ventriloquist act at the Pet 
& Animal Show at the Coliseum. She 
is appearing this week on the Joe 
Franklin TV’er. . . . Elektra’s Steve 
Harris has come up with what may 
be a helpful hint as to how to go 
about getting international airplay. 
Use the Armed Forces Radio & TV 
Network. Bill Ezell is the program 
director for approx. 300 stations of 
the network. He can be reached at 
1016 N. McCadden Place, Hollywood, 
Calif 

Ron Weisner at Metro says that the 
latest Lanie Kazan effort on MGM, 
“Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye,” is an out 
and out smash and that the Olympics’ 
new one on Mirwood, “The Same Old 
Thing,” is also a powerhouse. Ron 
mentioned that the Gary Stevens 
“Good Guy Oldie Album” is also doing 
well. . . . The Satans 4, currently 
playing at the Metropole in New 
York, took time out last week 
in order to play a benefit show “to 
aid the culturally deprived children 
of Brownsville.” The show was held 
on Dec. 21 at Junior high school #263 
in Brooklyn. . . . Atco has picked up 
distribution rights to a deck on the 
Hib label, entitled “If Its All The 
Same To You Babe,” by Luther In- 
gram. Ahmet Frtegun negotiated the 
deal with Bob Bateman of Hib Rec- 
ords. . . . Theodore Bikel recently 
played his first solo concert in London 
at the Royal Festival Hall before an 
audience of over 3,000 persons. While 
ir London the Elektra artist taped a 
“Tonight In Person” TV’er for the 
BBC. . . . Pete Seeger just played an 
advance (no newspaper ad) sellout 
concert at Carnegie Hall and is sched- 
uled to play a solo concert at the 
Olympia Theatre in Paris. . . . “Ooh 
Poo Pa Doo” by Billy Graham & 
Escalators is heading East after 
breaking out in Cleveland. . . . An 
all girl singing group called the Rea- 
sons, has been signed to a personal 
management contract by Frank Scin- 
laro, who also manages the Va- 
grants HAPPY NEW YEAR 

TO ALL. 


20 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



r 



I 


Get set for high-powered sales action with this great Original Soundtrack recording from the exciting 
new motion picture. Capturing all the flavor and style of the film, it’s right on target and sure to hit 
the mark with movie-goers and record buyers everywhere, so stock up now! COMO/COSO-5003 



COLGEMS 

Manufactured and Distributed by RCA 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


21 





SALUD — Stan Getz and Mort Nasatir, president of MGM/Verve, toast each 
other after re-inking ceremonies at the diskery’s home office. Getz signed a 
new long-term recording contract with the label just prior to his leaving on a 
pa tour of Mexico. The current Getz LP on Verve is “Stan Getz With Guest 
Artist Laurindo Almeida.’’ 



EPIC GOES LATIN— Epic Records 
has signed a young trio known as Los 
Melodicos and plans to release their 
first LP, “Tu Me Has De Querer,’’ 
early in 1967. The group, pictured 
above, is comprised of David Ortiz, 
Roberto Garcia, and Montito Rivera. 
The gToup performed at last sumer’s 
Festival of Puerto Rican Music in 
New York’s Central Park. 


2 SMASH SINGLES! 

m YOUR BREAD 
MAKER BABY 

SLIM HARPO 

EXCELLO 2282 


[HERE GOES A GIRL 

LITTLE JOHNNY 
TRUITT 

A-BET 9416 


415 Church St. 
Nashville, Term. 615-242-2215 


Lane Re-Elected 
AGAC President 

NEW YORK — Burton Lane has been 
re-elected president of the American 
Guild of Authors and Composers. This 
marks his tenth year in that post, 
having served since 1957. The com- 
poser of “Finian’s Rainbow’’ initiated 
the AGAC Collection of Royalty Plan 
which collected a record-breaking .$2,- 
500,000 in royalties for writers in 
1966. 

The AGAC Council also announced 
that the following officers were also 
elected: Leonard Whitcup, executive 
vice president; Edward Eliscu, vice 
president; Harry Ruby, president; 
Alex Kramer, treasurer; Kay Swift, 
secretary; and Abel Baer, chairman of 
the board. All officers serve without 
pay. 

In mail balloting to annually select 
seven new members of the Council, 
the following received the highest 
number of votes, and were elected: 
Burton Lane, Edward Heyman, Leon- 
ard Whitcup, Bennie Benjamin, John 
Jacob Loeb, Kay Swift, and Clint 
Ballard. According to the AGAC Con- 
stitution, writers choose Council mem- 
bers who in turn choose officers. 

Burton Lane was the winner of the 
first Sigmund Romberg award for dis- 
tinguished service on behalf of Ameri- 
can songwriters. 


Peters New Merrec 
Branch Manager 

CHICAGO — Frank Peters, a veteran 
of the Chicago record business since 
1951, has been appointed branch 
manager of Merrec Distributing here 
replacing Burt Loob, who has re- 
signed. Merrec is the Mercury Record 
Corporation branch locally covering 
the State of Illinois and Indiana. 

Peters began his record business 
career with Capitol Records in Chi- 
cago as a salesman. He moved to the 
Columbia Record Division of Sampson 
Company, Chicago, where he worked 
as a salesman from 1952 until 1959, 
when Columbia Records opened its 
Chicago branch. Peters remained with 
the Columbia branch until 1963 as a 
Chicago area salesman. He left the 
record business for a year, returning 
in March 1964, as Mercury Label’s 
regional man in the midwest, head- 
quartering in Chicago — a post which 
he leaves to assume management of 
Chicago Merrec. 


iiiilillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH^ mill mil 

FOCUS ON Jazz 

illllllllllllliilllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


On a mid-November night in New 
York City, after having watched The 
Knicks win a ball game at Madison 
Square Garden, it was decided that a 
fitting climax to such an auspicious 
beginning would be a visit to Basin 
Street East to catch the new, and 
much heralded big band of Buddy 
Rich. It turned out to be a most re- 
warding decision, because the band is 
“Double Oh Ess,” out of sight! 

Bright, But Serious 
Buddy, whose life has been one of 
music, has been making many tele- 
vision appearance of late, some with 
the band, but mostly as a single. This, 
in conjunction with an active promo- 
tional campaign to launch the new 
band. To the average viewer, devotees 
of programs like 'The Johnny Carson 
show, or The Mike Douglas program, 
it might appear that Buddy is too 
casual and flippant to be a serious 
bandleader. Nothing could be further 
from the truth. To be sure. Buddy is 
a wonderfully bright personality, and 
he is endowed with a rapier-like flair 
for comedy, but it should be made 
known that when it comes to matters 
musical, he is a veritable martinet. 
When you see the band in person, or 
hear its new Pacific Jazz album, you 
will appreciate how Rich’s discipline 
has infected the entire crew. It’s been 
a long time since we’ve seen an as- 
semblage of professional musicians, 
many of them veterans, having such 
a good time on the bandstand. This, 
more than anything else, reflects the 
spirit that abounds. 

Drum Solo Magic 

The new album. Buddy’s first as 
part of a long term contract with 
Pacific Jazz, is a very faithful crea- 
tion of what the band actually sounds 
like in person. It should be, because 
it was done at The Chez in Holly- 
wood, a former rock ’n roll palace, to 
which Buddy and the band will return 
in mid-January. The fidelity of the 
album is a tribute to Wally Heider, 
probably the best “on location” re- 
cording engineer on The Coast. Some 
of the veteran jazzmen who make up 
the complement of the band are Gene 
Quill, Marty Flax, Steve Perlow, Car- 
son Smith, and John Bunch. The pro- 
gram material has an excellent bal- 
ance; there are five jazz originals, 
including Sister Sadie; John Boice 
gets a trombone solo on his own 
arrangement of Gershwin’s My Man’s 
: Gone Now from Porgy And Bess; Jay 
! Corre, who gets the major portion of 
' the solo playing throughout the al- 
bum, is featured on the Oliver Nelson 
' arrangement of a pop tune that was 
' a hit of several months ago, Up 
i Tight; finally, there is a ten minute 
and forty five second version of a 
West Side Story medley. Unquestion- 
ably, this medley is the highlight of 
the album, and it invariably brings 
a standing ovation whenever it’s per- 
i formed in person. The chart was done 
I bv Bill Reddie, noted by Leonard 
Feather in the liner as the house con- 
ductor at 'The Dunes Hotel in Las 
Vegas. When you hear this arrange- 
ment, you must ask yourself, “Where 
has this fellow been hiding?” Aside 
from being the tour de force of the 
album, this medley offers the only 
instance of the Buddy Rich drum solo 
magic. 

‘Altogether Sound’ 

This leads to another observation: 
too often when the leader is a drum- 
mer he takes it as a license to use 
the band as a vehicle to display his 
drumnastics. Having listened to this 
band in person, and having listened to 
this album many times, it’s a treat to 
report that Buddy Rich’s role in the 
band is that of a member of the band. 
True, when the arrangement dictates 
it. Buddy does exhibit his rare talent 
as a soloist, but, by and large, he 
works as an integral part of the 
rhythm section. This point of view, 
or philosophy, is testimony to Buddy 
Rich’s belief in the altogther sound, 
a philosophy born of his vast big band 


experience. That experience includes 
tours of duty with Bunny Berrigan, 
Artie Shaw, Tommy Dorsey, and on 
and off, until recently, Harry James. 
In between his big band stints. Buddy 
fronted small jazz groups that, 
although small in number, always 
maintained the ensemble sound that 
is characteristic to big bands. 

It hardly seems possible that some- 
one as energetic and contemporary as 
Buddy Rich could have been as much 
a part of the traditional swing era. 
But it is an indisputable fact that 
Buddy has made the transition from 
era to era, vogue to vogue, with grace 
and ease. One of the standing jokes 
among the more enlightened music 
appreciators is the fa^-t that the 
“hippies” are always willing to ac- 
knowledge that Buddy is a great 
drummer, but have some reservations 
about his ability to play jazz. Still, 
whenever Rich comes to town for an 
engagement, all the drummers who 
are within commuting distance make 
their pilgrimage to watch him play. 
All the drummers means the “hippies” 
included. Can it be that this un- 
founded qualification about Buddy’s 
playing is the result of inadequacy on 
the part of those who can’t do what 
Buddy can ? We’ve yet to hear a 
“good” drummer deny that Rich is an 
absolute phenomenon. 

Battling Economics 

In the light of present economic 
obstacles only someone with Buddy’s 
devotion to good, big band music 
would undertake the launching of a 
seventeen piece organization. It must 
be assumed that Rich is acutely aware 
of the difficulties attendant to keeping 
a big band together. He’s enough of 
a veteran to know the problems of 
getting qualified players who are will- 
ing to travel, getting sufficient book- 
ings to keep the band working regu- 
larly, without too many dry spells, 
and the prohibitive costs that come 
with traveling a big band. But Buddy 
has a lot going for him; he’s an ex- 
cellent leader, a throwback to the 
days when a bandleader was some- 
thing of a personality, as well as a 
qualified player; the hand’s book is 
such that it has an almost universal 
appeal; and, finally. Rich’s reputation 
as a great drummer precedes him. 
Thus far, the band has heen kept very 
busy, particularly with a European 
tour in the immediate offing. The Rich 
band is emminently qualified to be- 
come a permanent part of the current 
musical scene, and if Pacific Jazz and 
the office that books the band do their 
jobs adequately, there’s no reason to 
believe that Buddy and his guys won’t 
make it. 


Australia Readies 
Show For Expo 67 

MONTREAL — As part of its official 
participation in Expo 67’s world fes- 
tival of entertainment, Australia has 
put together a special variety show 
called “Pop Goes Australia.” 

The program of music, comedy and 
, light entertainment will be presented 
from May 29 to June 3 in the 2,000- 
seat Expo Theatre on the 1967 World 
Exhibition site in Montreal. 

Some of Australia’s most popular 
radio and TV performers have been 
signed for “Pop Goes Australia,” in- 
cluding: Bobby Limb, who will serve 
as host, Normie Rowe, the Seekers, 
Kathy Lloyd and Rolf Harris. Also on 
the program will be boomerang- 
throwing champion Frank Donnellan, 
who will give a demonstration of that 
uniquely Australian sport. Musicians 
Johnny Bamford, Don Burows, Ron 
Faison, George Gaella, Johnny Sangs- 
ter and George Thompson will play 
Dixieland for the program. 


22 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



THE FIRST IN A L0N6 LINE OF HITS! ^ FROM A 6REAT NEW lAREL 


PERSONAL MANAGEMENT; MARC GORDON / 1556 N. LA BREA AVE.. HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. / (Area Code 213) 465-3lk 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



' MS B Saw Thirty New Albums In Jan. 


' NEW YORK — ?CA Victor has an- 
Tiouaced 0 : leiease of thirty new LP’s 
lor -he : of Jan The 30 are 

spie;;d ovoii "he areas of pop, classical, 
vintage, sacred and original cast. 

Among the pop product are “Don 
Bowman Recorded Almost Live, 
“From Sergio — With Love” by Sergio 
Franchi; Harold Vick and His Or- 
chestra with “The Caribbean Suite;” 
i “Out Of Sight” by The Liverpool 
Five; “John Hartford Looks At Life;” 
“The Broadway Soundaroundus” with 
Marty Gold and his Orchestra; Barry 
; Sadler offering “Back Home;” Dottie 
West “With All My Heart And Soul;” 
“John Gary Sings Especially For 
You;” “The Blue Boys In Person;” 
: “The Genius of Esquivel;” “Recorded 
' Live At Your Father’s Mustache by 
the World’s Finest Banjo Band;” “The 
i Youngbloods” and “Floyd Cramer’s 
“Here’s What’s Happening.” 

A pair of original cast LP’s are in- 
cluded in the release and they are 
“Breakfast At Tiffany’s” and “Arrive- 
derci. Baby!” 


Classical product under the Red 
Seal logo includes “Symphony No. 4 
in E-Flat (Romantic) (Bruckner)” b v 
Leinsdorf and the Boston Symphony; 
Strauss’ “An Alpine Symphony” by 
Kempe and the Royal Philharn^oni": 
Bream’s “Lute Music From The Royal 
Courts of Europe;” “Tales From Vien- 
na” by Fiedler and the Boston Pops; 
Bartok’s “Piano Concertos Nos. 1 and 
3” by Peter Serkin and the Chicago 
Symphony under Ozawa; “Stephen 
Kates;” “Lucrezia Borgia (Donizetti)” 
and “Mazurkas (Chopin)” by Rubin- 
stein. 

Two sacred albums, “This I Be- 
lieve” by Bobby Bare and “The Billy 
Graham London Crusade Choir” are 
included in the package. And two 
new items, “Ray Noble” and “Fraction 
Fingering” by Fats Waller are being- 
added to the Vintage series. 

The final product falls under the 
Colgems heading and includes “More 
Of The Monkees” and “Murderer’s 
Row” and original soundtrack. 


Capitol Opens ’67 With 31 Varied LP’s 


HOLLYWOOD — Capitol opens 1967, 
and its 25th anniversary, with 16 
albums including new releases by Lou 
Rawls, Nancy Wilson, Wayne Newton, 
Buck Owens and the Lettermen. 

Rawls, who has had two hit albums 
in a row, offers a dozen new songs, 
including his recent hit single, j 
“Carryin’ On.” j 

Nancy Wilson is backed by Billy 
May’s orchestra for “Nancy — Natural- ; 
ly”; Wayne Newton offers “It’s Only , 
The Good Times”; the Lettermen come | 
up with love songs for a winter night 
in “Warm”; and Buck Owens opens 
the year with “Open Up Your Heart,” 
an LP containing three of his recent | 
hit singles. 

David McCallum conducts his third 
Capitol album, “Music — It’s Happen- 
ing Now” and “The Sweetest Sounds 
Today” are presented by Guy Lom- 
bardo and the Royal Canadians. 

George Shearing performs current 
hits in “New Look” and England’s 


LOOK!!! 

A record destined 
for the . . . TOP . . . 

“Street 
Without Joy” 

by 

Tommy Finch 

on 

Cobra 

Records 

Distributed by . . . 

David Rosen, Inc. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Marne! of Maryland 
Baltimore, Md. 

Distributors in other 
areas are invited to 
help us gat this ter- 
rific record to market. 




leeori Oo. 

lew Holiand, Pa. 


Big Ben Banjo Band plays thirty of 
the best-known Beatle tunes in 
“Happy Banjos Play The Beatles.” 

“All The (jood That’s Happening,” 
is the first album by the Leaves, and 
Ned Miller follows his latest single, 
“Teardrop Lane,” with an album of 
the same name. Comedy takes the 
spotlight with “Adventures of Colored 
Man” — a Negro counterpart to Super- 
man — which was written by Teddy 
Vann. 

Completing the release are four al- 
bums in the Capitol of the World 
Series: “La Femme,” by Les Baxter, 
performed by Frank Pourcel; “Nor- 
wegian Songs Of Faith” with Olav 
Werner and Galleberg Sangkor; and 
Volumes 1 and 11 of “The Best Of 
Django Reinhardt.” 

Six new albums will be added to 
the Seraphim low-priced classical line. 
Four of the six will be available in 
stereo and two in mono only. The 
new albums are Verdi’s “Don Carlos” 
(complete) with Antonietta Stella, 
Elena Nicolai, Mario Filippeschi, 
Tito Gobbi, Boris Christoff and the 
Rome Opera Orchestra and Chorus, 
Gabriele Santini conducting. The 
three-disk set comes complete with 
Libretto and is available in mono 
only. 

Denise Duval stars in Poulenc’s 
“Les Mamelles De Tiresias.” 

Mezzo-Soprano Christa Ludwig is 
featured in an album of Lieder by 
Schubert, Brahms, Wolf, Richard 
Strauss and Mahler. Gerald Moore 
accompanies on piano. 

Sir Thomas Beecham conducts the 
French Radio Orchestra in a perform- 
ance of Franck’s “Symphony in D 
Minor,” and piano virtuoso Claudio 
Arrau performs the “Piano Concerto 
No. 1 in B. Flat Minor” by Tchaikov- 
sky, coupled with Weber’s “Konzert- 
stueck.” Lastly, German pianist Hans 
Richter-Haaser is represented by a 
recording of Beethoven’s “Diabelli 
Variations, OP. 120.” 

A pair of albums by Leonard Pen- 
nario and an LP of songs from France 
performed by Carmen Dragon and 
the Capitol Symphony will be added 
to Capitol’s series of “Good Time” 
Classics. The many moods of pianist 
Pennario are displayed in two albums: 
“The Spanish Piano” and “Leonard 
Pennario Plays — Just For Fun.” The 
Spanish album contains selections by 
Falla, Lecuona, Granados and Albeniz. 
“Just For Fun” features lighthearted 
music by Poulenc, Liszt, Arensky, 
Debussy and others. 

“From France — With Love,” by 
the Capitol Symphony under Carmen 
Dragon, features Offenbach’s “Can- 
Can,” the waltz from “Coppelia,” 
“Alouette” and “The Maid With The 
Flaxen Hair.” Also included: Ravel’s 
“Pavane For A Dead Princess” and 
the “Polonaise,” from “Mignon.” 

Angel Records opens 1967 with 
seven new releases, including a pair 
of albums by Jacqueline Du Pre, the 
young English cellist who makes her 
first coast-to-coast U S. tour next 
month. American-born pianist 
Stephen Bishop accompanies Miss Du 
Pre in Beethoven’s “Cello Sonatas 
Nos. 3 and 5. 


ALBUM PLANS 




Deals, discounts and programs being offered to 
dealers and distributors by record manufacturers. 

AMY-MALA-BELL 

Special incentive program through Dec. 20. See distribs for details. 

AUDIO FIDELITY 

Special 2 for 10 deal on all new releases and catalog. Expires Dec. 31, 1966 

DIAMOND 

"Buy 5 Get 1 Free” on all Diamond albums. Expires Jan. 31, 1967. 

PEACOCK-DUKE 

Buy 7 and-get-l-free on entire catalog, including new LP's. No expiration date 
has been set. 

FORTUNE 

1 free album when 6 are purchased in any combination. No time limit. 

GATEWAY 

Two free for every 10 albums purchased on entire catalog. Expiration date in- 
definite. 


GNP CRESCENDO ril 

15 albums free with purchase of 100 LP’s $3.79 and $4.79 retail. Indefinitely. 

JEWEL-PAULA-WHIT 

One free for every five purchased on entire catalog. No expiration date. J 

LIBERTY 1 

Special Hawaii theme promo. Terms available from distribs. Expires: Dec. 31. - 

LITTLE DARLIN' 

Special 2 on 10 deal on all product. No expiration date has been set. 

NASHBORO [j 

Buy-7-get-one-free on entire catalog including new LP’s. 100% exchangeable. '' 
No expiration date has been set. 

ORIGINAL SOUND 

15% discount on all LP’s — until further notice. 

PHILIPS , 

Discounts on new releases as well as entire catalog. SPM/SPS series are dis- 
counted 10%, all other classical albums discounted 20%. No expiration date 
announced. 

PRESTIGE 

15% discount on all LP product until further notice. 

ROULETTE 

15% discount in free merchandise. Expiration date indefinite. 

SCEPTER-WAND 

2 Albums free with every ten purchased. No termination date announced. 

SIMS 

3 free with every 10 purchased on entire catalog. No expiration date. 
SMASH-FONTANA 

Special discounts available through distribs. Expiration date not announced. 
TAMLA-MOTOWN-GORDY 

Buy-7-get-one-free. No expiration date has been set. 


ft 


Epic Sales Meet In Fla. 

Set For Jan. 8 To 12 

NEW YORK — Epic Records hosts a 
national sales confab from Jan 8 
to 12 in Miami Beach, Fla. All dis- 
trib principals and/or distrib sales 
managers and promotion managers 
will attend. 


Highlights of the sales meeting, 
reports Mort Hoffman, marketing di- 
rector, will be the unveiling of a new 
sales incentive program, as well as 
major new merchandising campaigns. 
The label’s product scheduled for 
Jan. and Feb. release will be an- 
nounced. In addition, seminars in the 
areas of sales and merchandising 
will be held. 



GYANT OPENING~On hand for the 
opening at The Chez in Los Angeles 
recently (Dec 7) of John D’Andrea 
and the Young Gyants are a group 
of Cameo/Parkway executives and 
distributors. Standing (from left to 
right) : Cecil Holmes, national pro- 
motion manager; Dick Gersh, presi- 
dent of Richard Gersh Associates, 
Inc., public relations counsel for 
Cameo/Parkway; John D’Andrea and 
Gene Gotthelf of Globe Distributing 


in East Hartford. In the middle is 
Neil Bogart, Cameo/Parkway’s sales 
manager. Seated at the table from 
left to right are; Marty Thau, region- 
al promotion manager; Ed Redman 
of M. S. Distributing in Chicago; 
Larry King of Dixie Distributing in 
Atlanta and Steve Goober, a local 
promotion man for Cameo/Parkway. 
D’Andrea’s first LP “Young Gyants 
At The Chez” has just been released 
on Cameo/Parkway. 

Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



24 





Steviel^nder 


to earth 


A PLACE IN THE SUN 

BANG BANG THANK YOU LOVE 

MR. TAMBOURINE MAN 

HEY LOVE SIXTEEN TONS 

DOWN TO EARTH 

SYLVIA ^ THE LONESOME ROAD 

MY WORLD IS EMPTY WITHOUT YOU 

ANGEL BABY (Don’t You Ever Leave Me) 

BE COOL, BE CALM (And Keep Yourself Togethj 







HAVE YOU NOTICED 
THE INCREASED USE 
OF THE ALBUM SLICK 
AS AN ADVERTISEMENT 
IN CASH BOX? 








TOP 50 IN R&B 


] TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

Aaron Noviila (Por/ow t( 


LOCATIONS 


^ frank Sinatra (Paprim SSI) 

2 MUSTANG SALLY 

Wlhon Pickett (Atlanile J«S 


4 STAND BY ME 

Spyrfcr Timor (MGM 1361T) 


5 WACK WACK 

Yaang Holt Trie (Brunsrrick 


A try a little tenderness 9 

^ Otis Podding (Veit 1411 


7 ARE YOU LONELY FOR ME 6 

freddlo Scott (Shout 207) 

B WHISPERS 

** Jackie Wilson (Brunswick SSJOO) 

9 I'M READY FOR LOVE 

Martha & The Vondellas (Gerdy 705*) 


IQ I VE PASSED THIS WAY BEFORE/ 
TOMORROW'S TEARS 13 

Jimmy PulHn (Soul S5077) 


1 ] PAPA WAS TOO 

' Joe To (Dial 4051) 


13 MERCY, MERCY 

' Cannon Ball Adderly 


ily (Capitol 5796; 


] 4 STANDING IN THE SHADOW 
^ OF LOVE 17 

4 Tops (Mettrrrn 1)02) 


15 I'M YOUR PUPPET 

James A Bobby Purify (Boll 649) 

lA YOU NEED CONFIDENCE 

^ Van Ikfkes (Mala 549) 

1 7 1 FOOLED YOU THIS TIME 

Geno Cfioni#/«f (Checker 1155) 


1 Q BACK IN THE SAME OLD BAG 
** AGAIN 2 

aobb*- Blond (Duke 412) 


1 Q KARATE 

' Emperor's (Mala 543) 

20 MEY LEROY YOUR MAMA'S 
CALLIN' YOU 


21 YOU KEEP ME HANGIN' ON 12 

Suoreme* (Motimrn ItOI) 

22 WY BABY'S GONE 21 

Donald Height (Shout 204) 

23 LOOKATGRANNYRUNRUN 32 

Howard Tate (Verve 10444) 

24 IT TEARS ME UP 25 

Percy Sledge (4(/ont/c 2JS6; 


25 PARTY 


'UUUIUI ^ 

26 another night _ 1 

DlonneWorwlck(Sccptefl2W) 

-- 1 


27 HUMMING 

“• Som & Dare (Stas 204) 

28 ' can t please you 

Jimmy Pebblns (Jerhart 207) 


29 I'M GONNA MISS YOU 

4r</jfJei (Brunswick SJJOi; 


30 !;(1T''LONe you need 

Miracles (Tamla 54U0; 

31 96 TEARS 

Big A4ayM( (Pe)oe 112) 

32 SILVER BELLS 

Earl Grant (Dacca 25703; 

33 S*®'' WHAT, I MEAN 

Dr»/leri (Atlantic 2364) 


34 ON GUARD 

falcons (Big Wheel 1967) 


35 ^CU CAN BRING ME ALL 
YOUR HEARTAChS 

Lea Pawls (Capttel 5799) 


36 SUPERMAN 

Hesitations (Kopp 790) 


37 BLACK OLIVES 

Bad Bays (Paula 254) 


38 aSn"' p\a'‘« ® 

Mabla John (Stan 205) 


39 fOR A LITTLE 


40 IS SOUL! 3 „ 

Ben E. King (Atec 64S4) 

41 A GOOD LOVE rn 

Lorraine Ellison (Warner Bros. 5859) ° 

42 *-EAVE me 47 

Thelma Jones (Barry 1010) 

43 9J?OSS CUT SAW 

4/lierf King (Stas 20)}, ~~ 

44 the tramp aA 

Lowell fulseme (Kent 456) 

45 F-SMi^^^P^^NTS OF LOVE Aa" 

Lrtila Richard (Okeh 4-7242) 

46 COME BY here __• 

Inez 9 Chortle Fex iMusicer 1201) 


47 JovJfs”*'" *YR0NG my 

Mottle Moultrie (Columbia 443657; 


48 fYERYBODY DANCE NOW — ' 

Soul City (Goodtime 801) 

49 I LOVE YOU MORE aPtw 

Lee Williams i Cymbals (Carnlyal 521) ‘ 


50 « 


1987; 





Next time an angry mother asks you: 




sell her this 


The star of TV’s “Family Affair’’ with a 
record that’s going to be a family affair. It’s an 
adult guide to teenagers-^their insights, 
their outlooks, their music. 

No! Sebastian’s single won’t turn a 
Scarsdale matron into a Village mlni-skirter. 

But it will tell her where it’s at. 

SEBASTIAN CABOT 
AND MOSTLY THEYSING 

b/w It Ain’t Me Babe K-13650 

from the up-coming album 

SEBASTIAN CABOT, ACTOR 
READS BOB DYLAN, POET 
E/$E-4431 
Produced by Stan Katron 

MGM Records is a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 


MGM 

RECORDS 


4 


ItOJAC 

Is Now Distributed By ROJAC 

Breaking This Week — 

A SMASH ALBUM! 



‘BIG’ MAYBELLE 

(America's Queen Mother Of Soul) 

GOT A BRAND NEW BAG” 

Rojac 122 


And . . . From The LP A Smash Single 

“96 TEARS” 

RA 112 

75,000 Sold In 11 Days 

Charted R & B And Pop! 

Record World-Cash Box-Billboard 

Thanks From 

Jack Taylor, Pres. 

Claude Sterrett, V. Pres. 

Dave Braithwaite, Nat. Sales & Promo. 

# & 

Ken Lutman — Indie Promo. 

Jerry McGee — Midwest Promo. 

Contact: Claude Sterrett, 

ROJAC RECORDS, INC. 

1274 5th Avenue, New York, New York 
A/C 212-348-0665 



iim iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiii 

PLATTER 

SPINNER 

PATTER 


Curses, foiled again! That’s the 
probable reaction of the villain who 
called WNVY-Pensacola and asked to 
endorse and co-promote the appear- 
ance of the Animals and Question 
Mark and the Mysterians at Pensa- 
cola Municipal Auditorium on Dec. 16. 
The caller identified himself as a 
member of Universal Talent and told 
WNVY that there would be no tickets 
sold at the door, only advanced ticket 
sales. The outlet’s management be- 
came suspicious and contacted Ron 
Sunshine of Premier Talent in New 
York, sole booking agent for the two 
groups. Sunshine stated that the Ani- 
mals would not arrive in this country 
until mid-February and that Question 
Mark and the Mysterians would be 
enroute to Santa Fe, New Mexico on 
Dec. 15 for an appearance Dec. 16. 
Local and state law enforcement 
agents are still investigating. 

A new concept in news and public 
affairs programming for W ABC-New 
York, T.S.T., Total Station Thrust, has 
been inaugurated at the outlet. T.S.T. 
will explore major issues facing the 
community through in-depth reports, 
documentaries, press conferences, edi- 
torials, and public service announce- 
ments, all concentrated in a period of 
one week. T.S.T. began on Dec. 11 
with a week-long series of features on 
the air pollution problem. Kick-off to 
the series was an appearance bv air 
pollution commissioner Austin Heller 
on the Dec. 11 WABC Press Con- 
ference. WABC vice president and 
general manager Walter A. Schwartz 
will deliver editorials throughout the 
week. Informing the public of its re- 
sponsibilities in the fight against air 
pollution, and pointing to whatever 
deficiencies may exist in current pub- 
lic programs aimed at curbing pollu- 
tion. Over half of WABC’s public 
service announceme’^ts will be devoted 
to the topic. The first T.S.T. project 
ended on Sunday, Dec. 18 with a half- 
hour documentary renorted by 
Murphy Martin of WA^BC News. 
Other T.S.T. series will deal with 
other major problems and issues at 
periodic intervals. 

Two Chicago FM outlets have 
merged. WXFM has taken over the 
facilities of WCLM-FM and now hits 
the air waves as a 50,000 watt outlet, 
transmitting from the 524 high an- 
tenna atop the 333 North Michigan 
building. Broadcasting twenty-four 
hours a day, WXFM is best known as 
ay good music” station, featuring clas- 
sical and show music. Robert C. Vic- 
tor, WXFM general manager since 
1959, purchased the outlet in Oct. 
1965. He is the former publisher of 
FM Guide Magazine, which he sold 
last year to Omnibus Magazine. 

Charles Schulz’s Snoopy, already on 
the charts with “Snoopy Vs. The Red 
Baron,” is now up for KATI-Casner, 
Wyoming’s version of the DFC. The 
outlet is inviting listeners to send in 
old medals they may have on hand to 
Johnny Shea, wake-up deejay who is 
on the air from 5 A.M. to 7 A.M. 
Snoopy will be decorated with the 
medals selected as winners. If lis- 
teners have no medals, they are in- 
vited to make or draw and color them 
and forward them to KATI. Top win- 
ners will receive free copies of the 
Royal Guardsmen’s single, or any of 
the outlet’s Fabulous Fourteen Survev 
records. Losers will enjov a bright 
moment of fame; they will be dubbed 
“Dog Fight Losers,” and have their 
names read on the “Shot Down In 
Action” list every morning on the 
Johnny Shea Show. Nice going, losers. 

Bob Ferris, host of KNX-Holly- 
wood’s “Firing Line,” presented a 90- 
minute documentary, “A Slice Of 
Christmas” on Dec. 22. Ferris, noted 
for his man-on-the-street interviews, 
took his tape recorder to contrasting 
areas of Los Angeles to present the 
varying moods of the holiday season. 
He chatted with an over-burdened 


shopper in Beverly Hills, a derelict on 
Skid Row, a shoeblack, and the owner 
of a gift shop for poodles. From the 
people he spoke with and the places 
he visited, Ferris put together a 
“sound” panorama of holiday atti- 
tudes. The program was produced by 
Skip Ferderber. 

Gene Klavan, 20-year veteran of 
radio and TV, has formed Profile Pro- 
ductions, Ltd., a new production and 
syndication company that will pack- 
age interview programs for FM radio 
outlets throughout the country. Ini- 
tially, the company will provide 15 
female-oriented half-hour broadcasts 
produced weekly in New York, Wash- 
ington, Hollywood, London and Paris. 
WNEW-FM-New York began broad- 
casting the programs Dec. 13. The 
outlet will broadcast two programs 
weekly while seeking audience reac- 
tion to time of day and day of week. 
WNEW-FM will carry the programs 
for at least 13 weeks with the outlet 
programming three programs daily, 
five days per week. Commenting on 
his new organization, Klavan said, 
“Right now, FM stations do not pro- 
vide today’s exciting, interested 
American woman enough motivation 
to tune in. The programming we will 
offer, tailored for women and done by 
women, will not only stimulate listen- 
ing, but also will give FM stations 
the opportunity to compete for the 
advertising dollar with bright and ex- 
citing foreground broadcasting.” 



ROYALTY AT WINSOR CASINO: 
Jimmy Durante will be king of the 
castle at Elmwood Casino in Winsor, 
Ontario, Canada during his appear- 
ance there. The court which attends 
him is composed of (1. to r.) Vince 
Pernicano, Detroit area promo man 
for Warner Bros./Reprise; Mrs. Perni- 
cano; Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cannon, 
WKNR-Detroit; Mr. and Mrs. Dave 
Schafer, CKLW-Winsor-Ontario; and 
Dick Perton and Ed Mullen, WKNR- 
Detroit. 

SPUTTERS: Robert Irvine has been 
promoted to the newly created post 
of assistant news director of the 
KNX-Hollywood and CBS Radio Pa- 
cific Network News Bureau. . . . Gene 
Taylor has been appointed general 
manager of WLS-Chicago. . . .Tom 
Cross has joined KPRS-Kansas City, 
Mo. as program director. . . . “Jolly” 
Jerry Boulding has been made produc- 
tion director at WOL-Washington, 
D.C. . . . Bill Kenner is music director 
at WBEE-Harvey, 111. 

VITAL STATISTICS: Richard A. 
O’Leary, previously program super- 
visor at KFMB-TV-San Diego, is now 
assistant to the Channel 7 director of 
programing Lee Schulman at WBKB- 
TV-Chicago. . . . Barry Richards exited 
WUST-Washington, D.C. for WINX- 
Rockville, Md. . . . Les Anderson has 
moved from WABQ-Cleveland to 
KYOK-Houston. . . . Sam Moore has 
left WGOK-Mobile for WJLD-Birm- 
ingham. . . . Oscar “Daddi-0” Alex- 
ander, formerly with WENZ-Rich- 
mond, is now in the morning slot at 
WEBB-Baltimore. 


I 

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30 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 




Cash Box — ^December 31, 1966 


31 



* 


Lsaves Kapp 

NSW YORK — Joe Zaleski has an- 
iiouneed uis rcesignation from Kapp 
Icscords. v^iiere he held the position 
of general manager of the western 
division. 

In making the announcement, Za- 
ieski stated that his decision to ter- 
minate his association with Kapp was 
based on personal considerations. He 
said that his relationship with other 
top-level company executives had been 
and continues to be ‘’most amicable.” 
He also stated that he will announce 
his new plans in the near future. 

Zaleski joined Kapp two years ago 
as manager of distrib sales. In May 
of this year he was promoted to gen- 
eral manager, western division, in 
which position he was responsible for 
sales, promotion, publishing and artist 
relations on the West Coast. He also 
set up Kapp’s West Coast office at 
6725 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 

He entered the record industry in 
California, in a post which the Inter- 
national department of Liberty Rec- 
ords. Later, he was associated with 
Liberty as division Sales manager in 
both Chicago and New York. In the 
latter city, he joined DCP Records, a 
new firm at that time, which was 
formed by arranger-conductor, Don 
Costa. He served with DCP as national 
sales manager and played a major 
role in establishing Little Anthony 
and the Imperials as a top disk attrac- 
tion. From DCP, he moved in Mar-ch 
1965 to Kapp. 


Victor Inks Dichter 

NEW YORK — Mischa Dichter, the 
21-year-old American pianist, who 
won a silver medal in this year’s In- 
ternational Tchaikovsky Competition 
in Moscow, has been signed to an ex- 
clusive recording contract by RCA 
Victor. 

Announcement was made by Roger 
Hall, manager. Red Seal Artists and 
Repertoire, who said Dichter’s initial 
recording will be with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in a perform- 
ance of the Tchaikovsky Piano Con- 
certo No. 1 directed by Erich Leins- 
dorf. 

“We are proud to have Dichter as 
a Red Seal artist and look forward to 
many distinguished recordings from 
him,” Hall said. 

His debut concerto is the same that 
launched Van Cliburn as a Red Seal 
Artist for RCA Victor when he be- 
came the first American to win the 
Moscow competition in 1958. 

Dichter was born in Shanghai and 
moved to Los Angeles with his parents 
at the age of two. He took his first 
piano lessons in Los Angeles at the 
age of six. His first success came in 
1961 at the age of 15 when he won 
first prize in a competition sponsored 
by the Western Division of the Music 
Educators National Conference. He 
studied with Aube Tzerko and later 
came to the attention of the noted 
piano teacher, Rosina Lhevinne, who 
invited him to study at the Juilliard 
School. It was following his studies 
at Juilliard that he entered the Mos- 
cow competition. 


FCC Approves merger 
Between ITT and ABC 

NEW YORK— The FCC last week 
ruled in favor of the proposed merger 
between the American Broadcasting 
Company and the International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Corp. The mer- 
ger, aproved by a 4 to 3 vote, will re- 
sult in a corporation with total assets 
of almost $214 billion, making it one 
of the top 20 largest companies in the 
country. The deal is expected to be 
completed late in Jan. 

In direct opposition to the comments 
of many, including members of Con- 
gress, that the extensive foreign oper- 
ations of ITT “would by some sinister 
and unexplained means exert influence 
upon the interests of the United 
States broadcast public,” the majority 
of the commission claimed that ITT’s 
acquisition of ABC would enhance, 
rather than hurt, competition in 
broadcasting by giving ABC a 
stronger financial setup. 

According to Donald F. Turner, who 
heads up the antitrust division of the 
Justice Department, “the outcome of 
the case has been a foregone conclu- 
sion.” He added that the Justice De- 
partment was not presently planning 
on bringing suit against the merger. 


MGM Sales 

(Continued from page 7) 

the overall success picture.” 

The ’67 first quarter figure, largest 
in the company’s 20 year history, 
comes hard on the heels of MGM’s 
strongest sales and profit year in 
1966. The label’s 1966 billing was up 
52 percent over the previous record 
total for 1965. 

Nasatir cited an “integrated team 
effoi't as the underlying reasons for 
the impressive growth.” “Top artists, 
top product, effective marketing and 
first class distributor cooperation all 
contributed to the success on the na- 
tional as well as the international 
level,” the label chief said, “It’s also 
gratifying to know that many of our 
biggest stars today were introduced 
or have developed under the MGM 
growth pattern.” 

Behind the general upswing in sales 
were a number of diversifying product 
moves by the firm and exploitation of 
potential in record and allied musical 
fields. 

The record firm acquired a number 
of significant soundtrack albums, like 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s “Doctor Zhi- 
vago,” which were industry leaders. 

M(5M Records also entered the tape 
field with a fully-rounded program 
that featured a strong push on four 
and eight track cartridge product and 
the “highly successful” introduction 
of the MGM Playtape 2 portable 
cartridge player. In commenting on 
this facet of company operations 
Nasatir said that Playtape 2 had “far 
exceeded our expectations. 

The label comnlex also entered the 
Cauitol Record Club in 1966 and has 
been an important asset to that organ- 
ization’s product picture. 

Another growth factor has been the 
continued development of MGM’s 


‘*1 Don^t Like A Girl 
With Hairy Legs” 

Norman Andre 

“IT’S WILD!” Chris Lane WJJD Chicago 

PALOMINO RECORDS 213 ho 5-2424 

6208 Santa M onica Boulevard Hollywood 
NATIONAL PROMOTION: George Jay Hollywood 


CY COLEMAH SINGS 
I “WHERE AM I GOING” 

on Columbia Records soon 




4 


NOTICE TO ALL ADVERTISERS 

BECAUSE OF A PRINTER’S HOLIDAY 
THIS FRIDAY, CASH BOX URGES ALL 
ADVERTISERS TO PLAN ON DELIVERING 
ALL COPY AND PLATES ON OR BEFORE 
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28 TO THE 
CASH BOX NEW YORK OFFICE. FINAL 
DEADLINE IS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 
29, AT 11:30 AM.. 


wholly-owned Metro distribution 
branches in New York, Chicago and 
Los Angeles, and its stronger repre- 
sentation in the international market, 
especially the starting of its own com- 
pany with Ricordi in Italy. 

New Offices 

Stateside, MGM Records has made 
a concerted drive in the rhythm and 
blues and country music fields. The 
emergence of the Royalettes, Howard 
Tate and Spyder Turner, to name just 
a few, in the R&B field and the addi- 
tion of key personnel in that field 
have a marked difference in sales. 
MGM has also opened its own C&W 
office in Nashville headed by Jim 
Vienneau. This proximity to the mar- 
ket has resulted in the acquisition of 
artists like The Stonemans, Tompall 
and the Glaser Brothers and Sandy 
Posey to an already strong artists’ 
roster led by Hank Williams, Jr. and 
Sheb Wooley. In addition Hack Cle- 
ment will be working closely with 
Vienneau as an independent producer. 

MGM has also opened its own rec- 
ords division offices in Los Angeles 
under the guidance of Clive Fox. This 
operation will account for stepped un 
control of West Coast talent and A&R 
operation with a special emphasis on 
significant soundtracks. 

Distribution 

Nasatir also mentioned the con- 
tinued sales expansion of various 
exclusive distribution deals as an im- 
nortant part of the MGM sales boom. 
Deutsche Grammophon classical nrod- 
uct for example, which the label dis- 
tributes in the Unitpd States, was up 
20 percent over 1965 at a time when 
the classical business is slow general- 
ly- 

The MGM Records’ distributed in- 
denendent Kama-Sutra label with the 
hit Lovin’ Spoonful, was well over ’65 
sales figures, and the label is showing 
even rnore impact with chart product 
from The Innocence. The Trade Winds 
and The Sopwith “Camel.” 

Soundtrack Leader 

In the all important soundtrack 
area. Nasatir underlined MGM’s out- 
standing job as industry-leader with 
ttiree ton-selling, chart-busting LP’s 
“Doctor Zhivago,” “Born Free.” and 
“The Singing Nun.” The recording of 
the Academy Award winning 
Maurice .Tarre score for the Metro- 
Goldwyn-Maver film “Zhivao-o,” ranks 
among the all-time best selling sound- 
tracks. To date the album is well oyer 
the one million mark. 

Other artists on the MGM label 
haye also scored heayily with album 
product: among them are Connie 


Francis, Herman’s Hermits, Eric (i 
Burdon And The Animals, Sam The J 
Sham and The Pharaohs, Roy Orbi- ^ 
son and Lou Christie. Jj 

Verve Expansion If 

Nasatir also singled out the diyersi- 
fication of the Verye label as an im- || 
posing ingredient in the record-break- ip 
ing sales results. The addition of the \i 
Righteous Brothers, the initial entry 
from The Mothers of Inyention and ' 

from Arthur Prysock haye nicely )J 

augmented strong sales from Jimmy i 

Smith, Stan Getz, Willie Bobo, Wes 
Montgomery, Cal Tjader and Astrud 
Gilberto. Walter Wanderley’s first 
album has also giyen a significant J 

sales boost to Verye. 

Talking about futures becoming pre- j 

sents, Nasatir referred to the Verye/ l 

Folkways scene which continues to 
“build nicely” under label manager 
Jerry Schoenbaum’s direction. He re- ^ 

yealed that orders for the second Blues 
Project album, “Projections,” haye 
already topped sales of their first LP. 

Two more artists are “substantial 
sellers,” Janis Ian and Laura Nyro. 

The King Leo label was also formed 
in 1966 as a regular price deluxe, 
double-fold line to tie in with TV 
spectaculars and out-of-the-ordinary 
childrens’ product. The first numbers ' 
in this line, “How the Grinch Stole 
Christmas” based on the MGM-TV 
snecial, and “You’re A Good Man 
Charlie Brown,” based on the “Pea- 
nuts” cartoon characters, haye been 
most successful. 

< 

Budget Growth 

In February of 1966, MGM Records 
added new labels to its budget repre- 
sentation that made a most significant ^ 
contribution to the total sales picture. 

In addition to better-than-ever sales 
from its pop Metro banner, VSP was 
created to appeal to the budget-minded 
iazz buyer. Heliodor was tailored 
snecificallv for the classical buyer and 
Leo the Lion Records was brought un 
to date and scored with its “liye 
action” and education-slanted play 
albums. “Batman.” “Superman.” and 
many other new titles sold well. 

The Singles Front 

On the singles front, the MGM » 
family of labels, racked up consistent 
chart and sales action with its maior < 
artists. The label had its biggest sales 
week for singles in December when 
more than 655,000 45’s were sold. In 
when 1P66 two of these singles, “LiP 
Red Riding Hood” by Sam the Sham 
and The Pharaohs and “Summer In 
The City” by The Loyin’ Snoonful < 
qualified for RIAA certification as 
million sellers. r 


3a 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


33 







'AWMiTHEKINCi, 




THE WICKED PICKETT— Wilson Pickett— 
Atlantic M /S 8138 

A collection of pop-R & B standards and new 
blues material. “Mustang Sally,” currently on 
the charts, is the lead otf tune. Other efforts are 
“Everybody Needs Somebody To Love” and 
“Three Time Loser.” Wilson Pickett displays an 
earthy, down-home style, and the album should 
be in great demand. Both the singer’s fans, in 
particular, and lovers of good pop sounds in gen- 
eral. should make this LP a winner. 



A SYMPHONY FOR SUSAN— The Arbors- 
Date TEM 3003/TES 4003 

The Arbors sing a batch of pop goodies. A 
fresh, talented, and versatile group, the quartet 
renders the title tune, “A Symphony For Susan,” 
a recent chart item, and “A Day In The Life Of 
A Fool” to create a unique, distinctive sound on 
this album, and this is one of the reasons that the 
set is likely to be a huge success. 


THE EGGPLANT THAT ATE CHICAGO— Dr. 
West’s Medicine Show and Junk Band — Go Go 22 
17 001 

This is a wild outfit. Dr. West’s Medicine Show 
and Junk Band uses kazoo, washtub, washboard, 
1949 Buick car bumper bracket, Taiwan finger- 
piano, and Tibetan temple block. The tunes in- 
clude the title song, “'The Eggplant That Ate 
Chicago,” “How Lew Sin Ate,” and “The Old 
Fruit Peddler.” The group’s soft, subtle sound 
takes on the power of a marching band. This LP 
should be a hot sales item. 


TOMORROW NEVER COMES— B. J. Thoma.s— 
Scepter SRM/SPS 556 

The unique song styling of B. J. Thomas is 
evident everywhere in this LP. Included on the 
disk are the title tune “Tomorrow Never Comes,” 
“Gonna Send You Back To Georgia,” and “I Don’t 
Have A Mind Of My Own.” The artist displays 
faithfulness to his material and style and the 
album should be a favorite among his many 
devotees. 




dTHECmTOLS 

WEGOTATHING 



POP BEST BETS 


UP AND AWAY— The Kingsmen— Wand WDM/ 
WDS 675 

The Kingsmen perform fourteen rock items on 
this album. New innovations in sound and choice 
of material are in evidence in this set. The lead 
off tune “If I Needed Someone,” written by Beatle 
George Harrison, exemplifies this new sound. 
“Grass Is Green” and “Children’s Caretaker” are 
both sensitive and simple in feel and poetic in 
lyric. The Rolling Stones’ Mick dagger contrib- 
utes “Under My Thumb.” The LP should be a real 
mover. 


FROM RIO WITH LOVE— Walter Wanderley— 
Tower T/TS 5047 

Featuring such cleffings as: “Rio And I,” 
“Quiet Stars,” “Life’s Poem,” and “I’ll Only Go 
With A Woman,” this set is a rich and varied 
program of Walter Wanderley’s music. This one 
is a sure to please item for all of Wanderley’s 
many fans as well as fans of Latin music in 
general. 


MA VIE — MY LIFE — Paul Vance — Scepter SRM/ 
SPS 557 

Paul Vance, songwriter, records his first LP as 
a singer. He sings “Dommage, Dommage,” a 
tune he wrote, the title track “Ma Vie (My 
Life),” and “My Little Corner Of The World.” 
The artist demonstrates that he can blend mean- 
ingful interpretations of his own works and that 
of others with the flair of a total professional. 
This album should serve as a fine introduction of 
the chanter to an appreciative audience. 




SEE REVERSE SIDE FOR TITLE— Jim 
Kweskin & Jug Band — Vanguard VRS 9234/VSD 
79234 

A pleasant and delightful romp into the devil- 
may-care, frolicking world of jug band music. 
“Blues In The Bottle,” “Never Swat A Fly,” 
“Richland Woman,” “ Papa’s On The Housetop,” 
and “Viola Lee” are outstanding tracks. A sure to 
please gift item, especially for the folk-oriented 
listener. Set is already climbing the Top 100 
Albums. 


THE KISSIN’ COUSINS SING— Lew Davies and 
his Orchestra — Project 3 PR5001SD 

Another Project 3 Total Sound recording. The 
Kissin’ Cousins sing against the background of 
orchestral arrangements of Lew Davies. The LP 
presents a sharp definition of solos and sections, 
warm presence of musical colors and instrumental 
characteristics, plus the excitement of “in-depth,” 
total realization of orchestration and dynamics. 
This package should make a lot of friends. 


WE GOT A GOOD THING— Capitols— Atco M/S 
33-201 

The Capitols offer a gathering of rock efforts. 
The group demonstrates on this album that it can 
handle many different types of material. The 
selections include tunes that have been hits for 
other artists, like the Troggs’ “Wild Thing,” 
Percy Sledge’s “When A Man Loves A Woman,” 
as well as the Capitols’ own “We Got A Thing 
That’s In The Groove.” The trio sings them all 
with zest and fervor, and the LP is likely to 
prove a fast-moving sales item. 


A MAN AND A WOMAN — Ferrante & Teicher — 
United Artists— UAL 3572/UAS 6572 

The gifted Ferrante and Teicher interpret 
motion picture themes. Among the tracks are the 
title tune, “A Man And A Woman,” “Comedy 
Tonight,” from “A Funny Thing Happened On 
The Way To The Forum,” and “Born Free.” The 
duo has taken the great new melodies from the 
screen and made them their own on this album, 
via their lush string-filled orchestra and their 
dazzling arrangements. This ore should be a 
crowd-pleaser. 


THE BEST OF PIAF— Edith Piaf— Capitol D/DT 
2616 

An excellent offering of songs by the late Edith 
Piaf. “Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien,” “T’es Beau, Tu 
Sais,” and “Milord” are among the better tracks 
on this fine album. All of Edith Piaf’s many, 
many loyal fans are sure to go for this one. 


CHANGES — Jackie & Roy — Verve V/V6-8668 
This delightful offering of jazz/pop ditties by 
Jackie Cain and Roy Krai is sure to please all of 
the duo’s many fans. “Changes,” “Norwegian 
Wood,” “Yesterday,” “In My Life,” and “The 
Word” are excellent tracks on this, their first LP 
on Verve. Likely to be a very fast moving 
package. 


MUSIC FROM CABARET— Jo Basile & Orches- 
tra— Columbia CL 2575/CS 9375 

The “Continental Sound” of Jo Basile’s Orches- 
tra is well suited to the shifting moods of John 
Kander’s “Cabaret” score. “Willkommen,” “To- 
morrow Belongs To Me,” “Why Should I Wake 
Up?,” and the title song are blue-ribbon ventures. 
Likely to be a fast moving set with fans of the 
mainstemmer. 


34 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


II 



POP BEST BETS 



TRIBUTE TO RHYTHM AND BLUES-Chuck 
Jackson— Wand WDM/WDS 676 
A power-packed R&B workout by Chuck Jack- 
son, this set features such well known tunes as 
Wind,” “Hold On I’m Coming,” 
bd45789, and “Sonny” to name only four of the 
moie outstanding efforts. All of the artist’s many 
tans should go for this one in a big way. 



NOT WITH MY WIFE YOU DON’T— Soundtrack 
—Warner Bros. W/WS 1668 

The original soundtrack from the Warner Bros, 
tlick of the same title, should be a welcome sou- 
venir of the cinema venture. The “Main Title ” 
Hey Julietta,” “Big Beautiful Ball,” and “Ar- 
rivederci Hondo” are among the more outstand- 
ing tracks. Could be a popular set with the movie 
goers. 


TEQUILA A GO GO — Richard Davis & The Te- 
quila Brass— Audio Fidelity AFSD 616.5 

Richard Davis and the Tequila Brass interpret 
a group of pop outings. Trumpeter Davis, with 
wide experience in both classical and popular 
music, brings his virtuosity to bear on this disk 
Numbered among the tracks are “Shadow Of 
Your Smile,” “Guantanamera,” and “Cherry Pink 
& Apple Blossom White.” This album will find 
tavor with a large audience. 



LYNDONLAND— Various Artists— P S CB 558M/ 
558S 

Produced by Mischa Pelz and Willis S. (Sandy) 
Sanders this LP satirizes Lyndon Johnson and his 
administration. The title track features a tour of 
Lyndonland,” an amusement park against which 
much of the album’s comedy takes place. With 
comedy disks a heavy selling business, this set is 
likely to see lots of chart action. 


THE REAL FOLK BLUES — John Lee Hooker — 
Chess LP/LPS 1508 

An offeiing of folk blues by John Lee Hooker, 
who IS certainly one of the foremost exponents of 
this musical form. “Peace Lovin’ Man,” “Stella 
Mae’^^ and “One Bourbon, One Scotch, and One 
Beer are all blue-ribbon tracks. Bound to be a 
popular LP, especially with folk fans. 



LiyiNCl LEGENDS— Son House, Skip James, 
Williams— Verve/Folkways 

r 1/1' 1 S 3010 

Recorded live at the Cafe Au-Go-Go in Green- 
1 ^ package full of blues. 

White’s “Poor Boy,” Skip James’ “I’m So 
^ j ’c Somebody Evil” by Big Joe Williams, 
and Son House’s “Levee Camp Moan” are truly 
outstandii^ tracks. A must for the collector of 
folk and Blues material. 





PETER AND THE WOLF AND THE INCREDI 
BLE JIMMY SMITH— Verve V/V6-8652 
This version of the famous orchestral worl 
differs in many ways from the original. This is 
without narration and it makes use of the jazi 
gToup, not the symphony orchestra. The origna: 
themes are used but they are now somehow dif- 
ferent because of the orchestration. There is new 
music, too, intended to give this version duration 
and to give Jimmy Smith room in which to im- 
provise. The album, highly original in concept, 
should find its originality rewarded in the market 
place. 


SPELLBINDER — Gabor Szabo — Impulse A/AS 
9123 

Gabor Szabo, guitarist, is featured in a group 
of jazz renditions. He is backed up by Chico 
Hamilton, drums; Don Carter, bass; and Victor 
Pantoja and Willie Bobo, Latin percussion. In- 
cluded on the album are “Spellbinder,” the title 
Hack, “It Was A Very Good Year,” and “Bang 
Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down).” Szabo stresses 
the importance of self-expression on this set, and 
his dedication to that quality is evident every- 
where on the LP. The disk figures to be highly 
popular. 



RAISING THE ROOF — Odell Brown & Organ- 
izers— Cadet LP/LPS 775 

Odell Brown and the Organ-izers raise the roof 
outings. The group is composed of 
Odell Brown, organ; Artee (Duke) Payne, tenor 
and alto sax; Thomas Purvis, tenor sax; and 
Curtis Prince, drums. Featured among the tracks 
are the title effort, “Raising The Roof,” “Strike 
Up The Band,” and “Day Tripper.” The Organ- 
izers evince fine musicianship on this album, and 
the LP should become a chart contender. 


CLOSER— Paul Bley Trio— ESP— Disk 1021 
A free-swinging excursion into the jazzman’s 
world. Personnel of the Paul Bley Trio includes: 
Barry Altshol, percussion; Steve Swallow, bass; 
and Paul Bley, piano. The title song, “Sideways 
In Mexico,” and “Start” are blue-ribbon tracks. 
A must for the jazz fancier. 


CLASSICAL PICKS 



DEBUSSY: THE MARTYRDOM OF ST. SEBAS- 
TIAN — New York Philharmonic/Bernstein— Co- 
lumbia M2L 353/M2S 753 
This boxed set is the first English recording of 
this monumental work of Debussy and texts are 
enclosed. The New York Philharmonic under the 
masterful direction of Leonard Bernstein, pro- 
vides the background for the text as spoken by 
Felicia Montealegre and Fritz Weaver. This, the 
only religious work of Debussy’s maturity, ’is a 
must for those interested in the music of this 
fine composer. 



THE BALLAD OF BABY DOE — New York City 
Opera — Heliodor HS-25035-3 

This opera by Douglas Moore and John Latouch 
is masterfully performed by the New York City 
Opera featuring Beverly Sills, Walter Cassel, and 
Frances Bible. Julius Rudel directed this LP, 
which was recorded under the auspices of the 
Koussevitzky Music Foundation. Should be a pop- 
ular set with opera buffs. 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


35 








io Seek Dafe 

C©-‘.''3i' Heg. M9r. 

NEW YGIc’C — Eddie Matthews, newly 
.-.ppointea ni.inag'er of Date Records, 
has announced plans to travel to the 
VVest Coast early in Jan. in order to 
interview possible candidates for the 
post of West Coast regional manager 
of the firm. 

The conclusion of 1966 finds Date 
in high gear, according to Matthews, 
who foresees an even greater year 
in 1967. Date is currently clicking 
with the Peaches & Herb single, 
“Let’s Fall In Love,” which was a hit 
R&B record and is now making noise 
in the pop field. Another Date group, 
the Arbors, has also made a name for 
itself with its recent “Symphony For 
Susan” single and LP offering. 

Matthews has also indicated that 
the label has just acquired two more 
singles masters, which will be re- 
leased later this month. 

Date is distributed nationally by 
Columbia, and, beginning Dec. 27, the 
entire Date executive and field staff 
will call on each of the Columbia dis- 
tributors to personally greet them and 
thank them for a job well done. 


Cameo/Parkway Scoring Big 
With 'Sen. Bobby' Single 

NEW YORK— As Sen. Everett Mc- 
Kinley Dirkson continues to romp up 
the singles and album charts with his 
tale of “Gallant Men” on Capitol, 
another Congressional figure. Sen. 
Bobby is straining at the bit, ready 
to lend his name to posterity with 
his “Wild Thing” single on Parkwav. 

The single, a brainchild of comedy 
producers Chip Taylor and Dennis 
Wholey, is an uproarious spoof which 
has reportedly reached 75.000 sales 
in the first week of release. Both sides 
of the record feature the same tune, 
the top side as handled by “Sen. 
Bobby” and the flip in the hands of 
“Sen. Everett McKinley,” two char- 
acters from the fertile minds of 
Taylor and Wholey. Sen. Bobby, a 
takeoff on Sen. Robert Kennedy, is 
portrayed on the single by Bill 
Minkin, with Steve Baron and Dennis 
Wholey as minor characters. 

The cast is part of a group called 
the Hardly- Worthit Players, who re- 
cently released a Parkway LP, also 
a Taylor-Wholey production, called 
“The Hardly- Worthit Report. Cameo/ 
Parkway sales manager Neil Bogart 
indicated that the LP is being re- 
mastered to include the new single. 
Special display units, window stream- 
ers, counter cards, hang tags and di- 
rect mail stuffer inserts are now 
being rushed to distributors. Bogart 
revealed that he placed an initial 
pressing order of 50,000 on the LP. 


Disney Memorial 
To Benefit Cal-Arts 

NEW YORK— Walt Disney Music in 
conjunction with Buena Vista Records 
is releasing a commemorative LP en- 
titled, “The Music Of Walt Disney.” 
The album, which is scheduled for re- 
lease early in Jan., will be a non- 
commercial set with all royalties and 
profits from its manufactui-e being 
donated to the California Institute of 
Arts. In order that Cal-Arts might 
receive a gi-eater benefit from the 
sale of the Disney package, all 
production costs are being absorbed 
by Walt Disney Music. 

The album will contain music from 
Disney productions of the past 30- 
years. 

The late Mr. Disney had always 
been partial to Cal-Arts, which is an 
internationally oriented school leaning 
heavily on the graphic and lively 
arts. 


ASCAP's New Writer Deal 
Ups Membership Roster 

NEW YORK— In the last four 
months of 1966, about 25% more 
writers joined the American Society 
of Composers, Authors and Publishers 
(ASCAP) than in the same four 
month period of 1965 and 1964. 

This significant increase is attrib- 
uted to the new program of royalty 
distribution inaugurated by ASCAP 
last September. The management ex- 
ecutive in charge of the Society’s 
survey and distribution, Paul Marks, 
in commenting about this increase, 
noted: “Most of our new writers have 
indicated great interest in the provi- 
sions of the new system which permit 
them to receive royalty payments 
based upon current performances in 
the first few years of their member- 
ship, with the opportunity at a later 
date (at their option) to switch over 
to the system in which they average 
their performances.” 

The changes under the new plan 
call for quicker payments to writers 
and publishers, and also make it pos- 
sible for the Society to give advances 
to writers against future royalties 
based on evidence of current activity. 
Marks also pointed out that many 
writers and music publishers not 
affiliated with the Society have been 
reviewing their performance royalty 
situation and have been inquiring 
about how they would fare as mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Among ASCAP’s newly elected 
writer members are such well-known 
performers as Barbra Streisand, Don 
Ho and Jeri Southern, among others. 

The new plan for payment of per- 
formance fees has been in operation 
since last September 12, when it was 
approved by Chief Judge Sylvester 
Ryan of the Federal Court in New 
York, following a hearing on the mat- 
ter. 



WINDOW ON UA — The two windows above are the World 
Of Music (left) and Sam Goody (right) both of New York City. Included 
among the featured albums on display, are soundtracks from “Hawaii,” “A 
Man And A Woman,” and “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The 
Forum. 



ixmdaJuC Area Code 615-244-1867 

RECORD PRESSING COMPANY, Inc. 
Your Standard of Comparison. 

415 FOURTH AVE., SO. NASHVILLE, TENN. 37207 




/ii/ll 


TOP lOO LABELS 


ABC Paramount 

A & M 23, 57, 

Atlantic 18, 28, 65, 90, 

Bang 

Barry 

Bell 

Brunswick 31, 71 

B. T. Puppy 


Calla 

Cameo 

Capitol . . 6, 27, 37, 48, 50, 54, 67, 

Checker 

Colgems 1 , 

Columbia 14, 55, 


Diol 

Diamond . . 
Dunhill . . . . 
Dyno Voice 


86 

100 

95 

40 

100 

45 

76 

59 

88 

22 

96 
47 
25 
72 

58 

17 

16 

75 


Epic 


4, 9, 35, 85 


Fontana . . . . 
Four Corners 
Fraternity . . . 


GNP 

Gordy 12, 19, 

Imperial 33, 

Kama Sutra 38, 52, 

Kapp 11, 60, 


2 

81 

99 

77 

41 

70 

68 

97 


lijlltiilllill! !!!!!, 'i't 'i': !, i’:' illllli' li'iJ ,:'i lil-:!' I':; lUlllllllli 

Laurie 3 

Liberty 42 

London 100 

Lucky Eleven 46 

Mala 63 

Mercury 39, 51 

MGM 15, 20, 36, 53, 61, 80 

Monument 93 

Motown 30 

Musicor 83 

New Voice 13 

Original Sound 21 

Parlow 8 

Parrot 79 

Philips 24, 56, 94 

RCA Victor 91 

Reprise 5, 7, 64, 78, 89 

Roulette 34 

Scepter 62 

Shout 74 

Smash 84 

Stax 43, 73 

Soul 26 

Tamla 10, 44 

Tico 98 

United Artists 66 

U.S.A 82 

Valiant 32 

Verve 92 

Volt 29 

Warner Bros 49 


Burton Dinner Is 
'66 Tax Deduction 

NEW YORK — The Friends of Robert 
J. Burton, an informal, all-industry 
committee now engaged in a cam- 
paign to establish a Burton Memorial 
Fellowship at Columbia University, 
has stressed the importance of the 
timing of gifts to the drive in order 
to take maximum advantage of tax 
considerations. 

Although the dinner dance, the pro- 
ceeds of which will be used in setting 
up the Burton Fellowship for study 
and research in copyright law, will 
not be held until March 21, it was 
noted that contributions for places or 
tables at the affair, extended now, 
would be deductible against taxes de- 
clared for the current year. 

For those many firms or individuals 
who have enjoyed a good year of 
profits in 1966, the advantages of 
making the contribution of $50 per 
plate or $500 per table of 10, before 
December 31, are obvious. According 
to the committee, seventy per cent of 
each subscription is tax deductible. 

“We know,” said Morris Levy, com- 
mittee chairman, “that most of the 
responsible people in our industry, 
with an awareness of its needs, are 
going to get behind this tremendously 
worthy affair. It’s obvious that the 
sooner the pledges and checks are 
received, the sooner we can be sure 


Sylvia Telles Dies 

NEW YORK — Sylvia Telles, one of 
Brazil’s most popular singers, was 
killed last week in an automobile 
crash. At press time only sparse de- 
tails were available, but reports in- 
dicated that the accident occured on 
the European continent. 

The artist was associated with 
Kapp Records in the United States. 
Her first album here “Sylvia Telles 
Sings The Wonderful Songs Of An- 
tonio Carlos Jobim,” was released by 
Kapp in 1965, followed by “The Face 
I Love” in Oct. 1966. 


of the success of our drive to reach 
the $100,000 we need to establish the 
Fellowship. But each company or indi- 
vidual should make his own decision 
as regards getting the maximum tax 
advantages of the gift.” 

The dinner dance, being planned for 
2,000 guests, will be held in the Im- 
perial Ballroom of The Hotel Ameri- 
cana on Tuesday evening, March 21. 
All-star entertainment will be pro- 
vided. A full house will realize the 
goal of $100,000 sufficient to establish 
the self-perpetuating fund. Interest 
from the fund will be used to finance 
the education of a worthy student 
engaged in the study of copyright, or 
other law affecting the arts. Thus the 
recipient will be helping to memorial- 
ize the vast contributions made to this 
field by the late Judge Burton. 


UPCOMING EVENTS 




A Schedule of Major Industry Cvenis In the Coming Months 


EVENT 

SAN REMO FESTIVAL 

DATE 

JAN. 26-28 

PLACE 

SAN REMO, ITALY 

MIDEM (INT'L RECORD 
& MUSIC PUBLISHING 
MARKET) 

JAN. 30-FEB. 4 

PALACE DES FESTIVALS. 
CANNES, FRANCE 

NARM (RACK JOBBER) 
CONVENTION 

MAR. 5-10 

CENTURY PLAZA HOTEL, LOS 
ANGELES 

NARAS GRAMMY AWARDS 

MAR. 2 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO, LOS 
ANGELES. NASHVILLE 

FRIENDS OF BOB BURTON 
DINNER-DANCE 

MAR 21 

AMERICANA HOTEL, N.Y. 

NAB (BROADCASTERS) 
CONVENTION 

APRIL 2-5 

CONRAD HILTON HOTEL. 
CHICAGO 

COUNTRY MUSIC WEEK 

OCT. 19-21 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 


36 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


3 . 

13 

M i 

16 

3 ‘ 

I 

0 , 

3 

) 

1 

I 

ANNOUNCEMENT: 

I ■ " 

TO THE MUSIC AND RECORD INDUSTRY 

BUENA VISTA RECORDS will release early in January, 
a commemorative record album “THE MUSIC OF WALT 
DISNEY.” This album will contain music from Walt Dis- 
ney Productions over the past 30 years, from “Snow White” 
to “Mary Poppins.” Most of this material will be from orig- 
inal sound tracks including 3 Academy Award winning 
songs. 

This album is a non-commercial special release. Royalties 
and profits from its manufacture are being donated to the 
California Institute of Arts. 

The California Institute of Arts is a unique college, inter- 
national in scope, where all the arts, design, theatre, motion 
pictures, fine arts and music flourish together. Walt Disney 
" has said of Cal-Arts “It’s the principle thing I hope to leave 

- when I move on to greener pastures. If I can provide a 

place to develop talent for the future, I think I will have 
f accomplished something.” 


A ' 

L 

A 

r 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


36A 


2M/T^Ment Enter Working Agreement 


-j Y ‘ — MGM Records and 

!: . 1 ' Tiber’s Trident Productions 
a "• liti-phased working agree- 


.,T£T;i, on Jan. 2. 

Under the terms of the pact, MGM 
will release Werber’s production ef- 
forts for one year, and will market 
such product under the Verve, as 
well as other subsidiary labels. 

More than just a standard inde- 
pendent production deal, the merger 
will, in effect, establish Trident as a 
working adjunct to MGM’s west coast 
A&R Department. MGM becomes one 
of the first major labels to recognize 
vast contributions to today’s pop 
music market emanating from San 
Francisco. Some of the artists already 
signed include Blackburn and Snow, 
The Mystery Trend, the Sons of 
Champlin, Malachi, The Ensemble and 
the Don Scaletta Trio. 

In commenting on the pact with 
Trident Productions, Mort Nasatir, 
MGM president, said, ‘‘the vast back- 
ground and knowledge contributed by 
Frank Werber and his associates at 
Trident, will broaden Verve product 
representation in the overall market.” 


Werber, who discovered the King- 
ston Trio and promoted them from an 
off-campus trio into one of the most 
successful singing groups in the world, 
stated that a survey in depth of the 
Bay Area disclosed that San Fran- 
cisco, which has always been a center 
for creative people, is fast becoming 
established as the capital of the new 
wave of music being recorded today. 

“The Trident setup,” said Werber, 
“with its organization, high quality 
recoi’ding studio facilities, talent man- 
agement and development division, 
publishing companies, promotion and 
art departments all located under one 
roof in historic Columbus Tower, made 
this an ideal merger of intei’ests for 
us.” 

Werber, emphasizing the fact that 
the new setup would not be interested 
in any “quick-lived fad,” declared that 
his involvement will not be solely con- 
cerned with the singles market group 
sound. 

“We intend to delve into all aspects 
of music available in this area,” 
Werber said, “and this includes new 
forms of jazz, psychedelic sounds and 
1 the new emergence of holy music.” 


Fradkin To Head Heliodor 

NEW YORK— Philip Fradkin has 
been appointed to the position of 
supervisor of Heliodor Records, 
MGM’s budget classical line, by the 



PHILIP FRADKIN 


company’s classical division chief 
Jerry Schoenbaum. He succeeds 
Richard de Costa, supervisor since 
the label’s inception, who has just left 
to become the manager of the Ameri- 
can Wind Symphony Orchestra. 

Fradkin has most recently served 
in the position of assistant musical 
director with Westminster Records. 


Goldsboro Recuperating; 

No Date Changes Planned 

NEW YORK — United Artists’ Bobby 
Goldsboro took an enforced rest last 
week when a strep throat landed him 
in a hospital in his home town of 
Dothan, Ala. 

Goldsboro is reportedly responding 
well to treatment and is expected to 
be back in action well before his 
scheduled engagements next month in 
Europe. His dates there include his 
debut at the San Remo Song Festival 
preceeded by TV spots in England 
and France. 

Goldsboro is currently represented 
on the Top 100 with “Blue Autumn.” 



Hirt Buys Into Saints 

NEW YORK— A1 Hirt has bought 
into the National Football League’s 
latest franchise, the New Orleans 
Saints. He has been actively con- 
cerned for several years with bring- 
ing a professional football team to his 
home state. The club will begin opera- 
tion in the fall of ’67 and will use 
the Tulane Univ. “Sugar Bowl Sta- 
dium” until its own $30 million 
“Superdome” is completed. It is un- 
derstood that the RCA Victor artist 
will help to promote the team. 


Music Boom 

(Continued from page 7) 

000 each) and recorder (750,000). 
j Making music ranked second only 
j to reading among the country’s leisure 
I activities. One out of every 4.5 Ameri- 
I cans, 4 years old or more, played an 
instrument or received musical in- 
i struction. 

I Significant in the musical boom was 
the steady growth of the community 
orchestra. Of our 1,385 symphony 
orchestra, the vast majority, 1,033 
1 was made up of community groups. 
I Almost 90% of the musicians in these 
i orchestras were amateurs. 

! About 10 years ago, there were only 
I 650 community orchestras; 40 years 
ago, there were fewer than 100. 

With more than 242,000,000 radios 
in operation, the average adult Ameri- 
can listens about 16 hours per week 
I to radio programing, of which rougly 
I 80% comes from records. New tech- 
I nical and legal developments — FM 
stereo, color and mandatory inclusion 
of UHF tuners in all new television 
sets — are encouraging construction of 
FM and educational television sta- 
tions, among the major disseminators 
of concert music. 


Fred Foster Sound Studios 
Build 8-Track Facilities 

NASHVILLE— Fred Foster Sound 
Studios has installed Nashville’s first 
eight-track recording facilities. The 
unit was built by Minnesota Mining 
and Manufacturing, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, under the direction of Scotty 
Lyall, chief engineer of the Profes- 
sional Products division. 

Although Fred Foster, president of 
the Studios, has announced plans for 
a new recording facility to be built 
here in 1967, he said he plans to con- 
tinue operation of the present studio. 
Foster reported that he has already 
installed a new four-track Scully and 
that existing equipment has been com- 
pletely up-dated. 

The staff was recently increased to 
four full-time engineers with the ad- 
dition of Mort Thomasson and Bob 
Farris. Thomas Strong and Brent 
Maher round out the engineering 
team. 


RCA Victor Inks Simone 

NEW’ YORK — Nina Simone has been 
signed to a long-term exclusive re- 
cording contract by RCA Victor Rec- 
ords. ’I’he announcement came recent- 
ly from Ernie Altschuler, division 
vice president and executive producer, 
who has assigned Danny Davis to 
produce the artist’s recordings. 

The thrush came to the RCA Victor 
studios recently for a pair of record- 
ing sessions, and her first single for 
the label will be released shortly. In 
April of 1967, she will embark on her 
third European tour, with perform- 
ances scheduled in London, Amster- 
dam and Antibes. She will also make 
TV appearances in Spain as well as 
on Eurovision. Prior to her departure 
for Europe, she will play three weeks 
at the 'Troubadour in Los Angeles 
(opening Jan. 17), a month at the 
Hungry i in San Francisco (opening 
Feb. 13) plus several college concert 
dates. In Jan. she also plays the Vil- 
lage Gate in New York on the week- 
ends of Jan. 6 and Jan. 13. 


Peer-Southern Plans 
To Promote The Cumbias 

NEW YORK — Peer-Southern Music’s 
Latin Division has planned a large- 
scale program to promote a new 
dance rhythm, the cumbias, in 196'7. 
The cumbias, although originating in 
Columbia, has become extremely pop- 
ular in Mexico. Peer Southern plans 
to introduce the dance to the U.S. 
with the new Tico LP, “Cumbias A 
Go Go,” recorded by Roberto Ferrer, 
an American artist now on tour in 
Latin America where he has appeared 
at the Panama Hilton in Panama and 
on TV in Costa Rica. 

Peer-Southern has also been in- 
strumental in introducing via its 
copyrights such dances and rhythms 
as the rhumba, samba, mambo, cha 
cha, merengue and most recently the 
jequibau and are planning to repeat 
with the cumbias. 


Atlantic's Best Year 

(Continued from page 7) 

and was active on the LP front with a 
score of chart sets. The company also 
got busy on the future with the long 
term signings of a host of pop, r&b 
and jazz artists and increased its 
international activities with the sign- 
ing of many new licensees. 

Singles 

On the singles scene Atlantic burst 
through in the spring with two No. 1 
records. One was a million-seller with 
a brand new artist, Percy Sledge titled 
“When A Man Loves A Woman” which 
Sledge followed that up with two 
more hits, “Warm And Tender Love,” 
and “It Tears Me Up.” The Young 
Rascals had the other No. 1 item: 
“Good Lovin’.” Atco Records had a 
No. 1 chart disk. The Troggs’ “Wild 
Thing,” which helped introduce the 
English group to U.S. audiences. The 
group had two other hits in 1966, “I 
Can’t Control Myself” and “With A 
Girl Like You.” 

Bobby Darin came through with a 
big item for Atlantic with “If I Were 
A Carpenter,” and Sonny & Cher 
nailed down another hit on Atco with 
“Little Man.” Wilson Pickett scored 
with four chart-busters, including 
“Mustang Sally,” “Land Of 1000 
Dances,” “Ninety-Nine And A Half 
Won’t Do,” and “Don’t Fight It.” 
Barbara Lewis went up the charts 
with “Make Me Belong To You,” while 
Mary Wells had a big one with “Dear 
Lover.” 

Hits on the Karen and Carla labels 
included Deon Jackson’s “Love Makes 
The World Go Round,” and the Capi- 
tols’ “Cool Jerk.” Joe Tex kept his 
Dial Records’ string intact with five 
hits including “A Sweet Woman Like 
You,” “S.Y.S.L.J.F.M.,” “I Believe I’m 
Gonna Make It,” “I’ve Got To Do A 
Little Bit Better,” and “Papa Was 
Too.” The Shadows of Knight scored 
solidly with “Gloria” on the Dunwich 
label, and Jimmy Hughes had a strong 
seller with “Neighbor, Neighbor” on 
Fame. 

On Stax and Volt there were hits 
aplenty. They included Carla Thomas’ 
“B-A-B-Y,” Eddie Floyd’s “Knock On 
Wood,” Sam & Dave’s “Hold On, I’m 
Cornin’,” The Mar-Keys’ “Philly Dog,” 
and four Otis Redding hits, “A Lover’s 
Prayer,” “Satisfaction,” “Fa-Fa-Fa- 
Fa-Fa,” and “Try A Little Tender- 
ness.” 

Albums 

Atlantic-Atco album sales reported- 
ly increased by 100 per cent in 1966 
over 1965. Sales were sparked by “The 
Wondrous World Of Sonny & Cher,” 
and their previous Atco LP, “Look At 
Us.” The Young Rascals had a smash 
Atlantic LP, “The Young Rascals,” 
and Percy Sledge had two hot items 
“When A Man Loves A Woman,” and 
“Warm And Tender Soul.” “The Ex- 
citing Wilson Pickett,” Joe Tex’s “The 
Love You Save” and “I’ve Got To Do 
A Little Bit Better,” “Solid Gold 
Soul,” and Bobby Darin’s “If I Were 


A Carpenter” were all solid sellers. 
“Wild 'fhing” by The Troggs on Atco, 
“Gloria” by The Shadows of Knight on 
Dunwich and “The Best Of The 
Righteous Brothers” on Moonglow, all 
were chart LP’s 

Best selling jazz LP’s on Atlantic 
included sets by Herbie Mann, Charles 
Lloyd, Brother Jack McDuff, Sergio 
Mendes and the Modern Jazz Quartet. 

On Stax and Volt the top sellers 
included three Otis Redding LP’s: 
“Dictionary Of Soul,” “The Soul 
Album,” and “Otis Blue”; Sam & 
Dave’s “Hold On I’m Cornin’ ”; and 
Carla Thomas’ “Carla.” 

New Signings 

Atlantic-Atco signed long term, ex- 
clusive contracts with a number of 
artists during 1966. Among the jazz 
artists who joined the label were: 
Charles Lloyd, Jack McDuff, Shelley 
Manne, Freddie Hubbard, Robin Keny- 
atta. Chick Corea and Junior Mance. 

Aptha Franklin was signed to At- 
lantic with her first release set for 
early 1967. Other artists who joined 
Atlantic in 1966 included Keely Smith, 
Dee Dee Sharp, The Bitter End 
Singers, Tamiko Jones, Charlie 
Brown’s Generation, The Buffalo 
Springfield and The Washington 
Square Stompers. Herbie Mann, a 
star on Atlantic for the past five 
years, signed a new long-term agree- 
ment with the company. Through 
Atlantic’s French affiliate Barclay, 
Atlantic secured the rights to distrib- 
ute recordings in the United States by 
Mireille Mathieu. The company also 
made arrangements to handle distri- 
bution of Willie Barney’s Bright Star 
and Four Brothers labels and George 
Tobin’s Brahma label. 

In February of 1966 Atlantic con- 
cluded a contract with the RCA Victor 
Record Club which enabled the club 
to make available to its members 
Atlantic and Atco LP’s, and Stax, 
Volt, Dial and Focus LP’s for which 
Atlantic has the distribution rights. 

Foreign Sales 

Atlantic’s foreign sales underwent 
an expansion in 1966 aided by pro- 
motional tours overseas of many 
Atlantic artists and the appointment 
of a number of new foreign licensees 
to handle the Atlantic labels. Sonny 
& Cher made a 1 month long tour of 
Europe. Wilson Pickett, Bobby Darin, 
Ben E. King, Solomon Burke, Charles 
Lloyd, Otis Redding, Junior Wells, 
Leslie Uggams and the Young Rascals 
also made successful overseas tours in 
1966. 

New licensees for Atlantic product 
appointed in 1966 by Nesuhl Ertegun, 
Atlantic vice-president and director 
of International Operations, included 
Polydor Records for England, Quality 
Records for Canada, Barclay Records 
for Belgium and Switzerland, Polydor 
Records for Mexico, Brazil, Peru, 
Columbia and Chile, Polydor Records 
for Holland and Teal Records for 
South Africa. 




36u 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



Ga^ itox 


TOP 100 Albums 


DECEMBER 31, 1966 


THE MONKEES 

(Colgems COM/COS 101) 


Po5. Last Week 
1 


25 


2 

S.R.O. 

Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass 
(A&M LP 119 /SP 4119) 

2 

26 

3 

DR. ZHIVAGO 

Soundtrack (MGM E/SE 6 ST) 

3 

• 

4 

JE M'APPELLE BARBRA 

Barbra Streisand 
(Columbia CL 2547/CS 9347) 

4 

28 

5 

GOT LIVE IF YOU WANT IT 

5 


Rolling Stones (London LL 3493 /PS 

493) 

29 

6 

PARSLEY, SAGE, ROSEMARY & 


THYME 

Simon & Garfunkel 
(Columbia CL 2563/CS 9363) 

6 

• 


SOUND OF MUSIC 

8 

31 


Soundtrack (RCA Victor LOCD/LSOD 2005) 


• 

BORN FREE 

9 

32 


Roger Williams (Kapp KL 1501/KS 3501) 

33 

■1 

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL 

New Vaudeville Band 
(Fontana MGF 27560/SRF 67560) 

11 

34 

1 ,1. 10 

WHAT NOW MY LOVE 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A & M LP 114/SP 4114} 

7 

35 

i ll 

i I 

SUPREMES A GO-GO 

(Motown M/S 649) 

10 

• 

; 

HUMS OF THE LOVIN' 
SPOONFUL 

(Kama Sutra KLP/KLPS 8054) 

14 

37 

i.| 13 

SOMEWHERE MY LOVE 

Ray Conniff Singers 
(Columbia CL 2519 /CS 9319) 

13 

38 

14 

THE MAMAS & THE PAPAS 

(Dunhill D/DS 50010) 

15 

39 

15 

GOING PLACES 

17 


1 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A & M LP 112 /SP 4112) 


40 

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL 

Lawrence Welk 

(Dot DLP 3774/DLP 25774) 

25 

41 



• 

THE BEST OF HERMAN'S 
HERMITS, VOL. 2 

(MGM E/SE 4416) 

21 

• 

; 18 

THE WILD ANGELS 

Soundtrack (Tower T/ST 5043) 

18 

43 

19 

SPINOUT 

19 



Elvis Presley (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3702) 

44 

• 

DEAN MARTIN TV SHOW 

(Reprise R/RS 6233 /RS 6233) 

23 

45 

21 

2nd GOLD VAULT OF HITS 

Four Seasons 

(Philips PHM 200-221/PHS 600-221) 

22 

46 

22 

WONDERFULNESS 

20 

1 

Bill Cosby (Warner Bros. W/WS 1634) 


47 

' 23 

ii 

GOLDEN GREATS OF GARY 
LEWIS 

(Uberty LRP 3468/LST 7468) 

16 ) 

j 

48 

ji 

THE TEMPTATIONS GREATEST 
HITS 

(Gordy GLP/SLP 919) 

3’ 

49 

101 

SPAGHETTI SAUCE AND OTHER 

DELIGHTS 


110 

102 

Pat Cooper 

(United Artists UAL 3548//UAS 6548) 

SEE REVERSE SIDE FOR TITLE 


111 

Jim Kwesken & Jug Band 
(Vanguard VRS 9234/VSD 79234) 


112 


, 103 

WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE — BANG 
BANG 

113 


Joe Cuba Sextet (Tico 1146) 


1 104 

WILD THINGS 

Ventures (Dolton BLP 2047/BST 8047) 


114 

i 105 

COMMAND PERFORMANCE 

Doc Severinson (Command 904) 


115 

, 106 

YOU ASKED FOR IT 

Ferrante & Teicher 


116 

) 

' 107 

1 

(United Artists UAL 3526/UAS 6526) 

THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM 

Jack Jones (Kapp KL 1486/KS 3486) 


117 

00 

o 

WHISPERS 

Jackie Wilson 

(Brunswick DLM 54122/DLS 754122) 


118 

1 1 

VINTAGE STOCK 

Mary Wells (Motown 653) 


119 


WHIPPED CREAM AND 
OTHER DELIGHTS 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A & M LP/SP 110) 


Pos. Last Week 
26 


SERGIO MENDES & 
BRASIL '66 

(A i M LP 116/SP 4116) 


THAT'S LIFE 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise F/FS 1020) 

BORN FREE 

Soundtrack (MGM B/SC 4368) 


LOU RAWLS SOULIN' 

(Capitol T/ST 2566) 


FOUR TOPS LIVE! 

(Motown MLP/SLP 654) 

ANIMALISM 

The Animals (MGM E/SB 4414) 


GUANTANAMERA 

Sandpipers (A&M LP 177 /SP 4177) 


96 TEARS 

? Question Mark & Mysterians 
(Cameo C/CS 2004) 


12 

53 

29 

24 

59 

32 

27 

34 


50 

51 

52 


MORE GREAT HITS 

Dave Clark Five 

(Epic LN 24221 /BN 26221) 


Pos. Lest Week 
51 


BERT KAEMPFERT'S 
GREATEST HITS 

(Decca DLM 4810/DLS 74810) 


52 


MAN OF LA MANCHA 


56 


Original Cast (Kapp KRL 4505 /KRS 5505) 


AWAY WE GO GO 63 

Smokey Robinson & The Miracles 
(Tamla TLP/SLP 271) 


REVOLVER 

Beatles (Capitol T/ST 2576) 


WATCH OUT 

Baja Marimba Band 
(A&M LP nS/SP 4118) 


28 

33 


RHAPSODIES FOR YOUNG 
LOVERS 50 

Midnight String Quartet (Viva V/VS 6001) 

JIM NABORS SINGS LOVE ME 
WITH ALL YOUR HEART 

(Columbia CL 2SS8/CS 9358) 


JACK JONES SINGS 

(Kapp KL 1500/KS 3500) 


A TIME FOR LOVE 

Tony Bennett 

(Columbia CL 2569/CS 9369) 


36 

40 

39 


CABARET 

Original Cast 

(Columbia KOS 3040/KOL 6640) 


75 


55 

56 


GREATEST HITS OF ALL TIMES 60 

Gene Pitney (Musicor AIM 2102/MS 3102) 


PSYCHEDELIC LOLLIPOP 

Blues Magoos 

(Mercury MG 21096/SR 61096) 


61 


57 

58 

59 


STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT 

Frank Sinatra (Reprita F/FS 1017) 


65 


THIS IS LOVE 

Al Martino (Capitol T/TS 2592) 

16 BIG HITS, VOL. #5 

(Motown M/S 651) 


44 


37 


FACE TO FACE 

Kinks (Reprise R/RS 6228) 


71 


61 


TERRY KNIGHT AND 
THE PACK 

(Lucky Eleven LE/SLE 8000) 

CHANGES 

Johnny Rivers 

(Imperial LPM 9334/LPS 12334) 


62 

76 


MR. MUSIC 

Mantovani (London LL 3474/PS 474) 


MAME 

Original Cast 

(Columbia KOL 6600/KOS 3000) 


41 

43 


SPIRIT OF '67 

Paul Revere & The Raiders 
(Columbia CL 2595/CS 9395) 


55 


JOHNNY RIVERS GOLDEN 
HITS 

(Imperial LPM 9324/LPS 12324) 


35 


FIDDLER ON THE ROOF 


45 


Original Cast (RCA Victor LOC/LSO 1093) 

49 


A MAN AND A WOMAN 

Soundtrack 

(United Artists UAL 4147 /U AS 5147) 


RAIN FOREST 38 

Walter Wanderly (Verva V/V-6 8658) 


BEST OF THE LETTERMEN 

(Capitol T/ST 2554) 


LOU RAWLS LIVE 

(Capitol T/ST 2459) 


SO NICE 

Johnny Mathis 

(Mercury MG 21091/SR 61091) 


30 

42 

46 


63 

64 


NOEL 

Joan Baez 

(Vanguard VRS 9230/VSD 79230) 


66 


THE TIME OF MY LIFE 

John Davidson 

(Columbia CL 2580/CS 9380) 


47 


65 

66 


TRINI LOPEZ GREATEST HITS 57 

(Reprise R/RS 6226) 


THE NEW FIRST FAMILY 

Bob Booker & George Foster 
(Verve V/V6-15054) 


69 


67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 


EAST-WEST 

Paul Butterfield Blues Band 
(Elektra ELK 315/EKS 7315) 


68 


HAWAII 

Soundtrack 

(United Artists UAL 4143/UAS 5143) 


67 


BIG HITS (HIGH TIDE 

AND GREEN GRASS) 65 

Rolling Stones (London NP-1 /NPS-1) 


GAMES THAT LOVERS PLAY 72 


Eddie Fisher 
(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3726) 


IN MY LIFE 

Judy Collins 

(Elektra ELK 320/EKS 7320) 


79 


PROJECTIONS 

Blues Project 

(Verve Folkways FT/FTS 3008) 


78 


GALLANT MEN 

Senator Everett Dirksen 
(Capitol S/ST 2634) 


88 


RENAISSANCE 

Association (Valiant VLM/VLS S004) 


113 


75 


76 

77 


48 

81 


78 

79 


81 

82 

83 

84 


Pos. Lest Week 

AND THEN . . . ALONG 
COMES THE ASSOCIATION 

(Valiant VLM/VLS 5002) 

TINY BUBBLES 

Don Ho (Reprise R/RS 6232) 

BILL COSBY IS A VERY 
FUNNY FELLOW, RIGHT! 

(Warner Bros. W/WS 1518) 

aftermath 

Rolling Stones (London LL 3476 /PS 476) 

COMING ON STRONG 85 

Brenda Lee (Decca DL 4825/DLS 74825) 

SIDE BY SIDE 94 

Sandler & Young (Capitol T/ST 2598) 

WHY IS THERE AIR? 86 

Bill Cosby (Warner Bros. W/WS 1606) 


77 

54 


BORN A WOMAN 

Sandy Posey (MGM-E 4418) 


TIME AFTER TIME 

Chris Montez (A&M LP 120/SP 4120) 


BREAK OUT 

Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels 
(New Voice M/S 2002) 


83 

90 

87 


LOOKING BACK 

Four Seasons 

(Philips PHM 200-222/PHS 600-222) 


95 


MUSIC OF HAWAII 

Henry Mancini 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3713) 


103 


87 


SUNSHINE SUPERMAN 72 

Donovan (Epic LN 24217/BN 26217) 


I DO! I DO! 

Original Broadway Cast 
(RCA Victor LOC/LSO 1218) 


89 

90 

91 

92 

93 


WORDS AND MUSIC ' 

Roger Miller 

(Smash MGS 27075/SRS 67075) 


73 


LONELY BULL 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A&M LP/SP 101) 


84 


ART LINKLETTER NARRATES 
THE BIBLE 97 

(20th Century Fox M/S 3187) 


ALFIE 

Billy Vaughn 

(Dot DLP 3751 /DLP 25751) 

WISH ME A RAINBOW 

Gunter Kallmann 
(4 Corners SCL/SCS 4235) 


111 


101 


94 

95 


COLLECTIONS 

Young Rascals (Atlantic M/5 8134) 


BIBLE 

Soundtrack (20th Century Fox TFM 
3184/TFS 4184) : 


93 


96 

97 


BROADWAY BASIE'S WAY 

(Command RS/SD 905) 


89 


98 

99 

100 


BUDDY RICH; SWINGIN' ' 
NEW BIG BAND 

(Pacific Jazz PJ 10113/ST 20113) 

SINATRA AT THE SANDS 

(Reprise 2F/2FS 1019) , 


102 

64 


THE APPLE TREE 

Original Cast 

(Columbia KOL 6620/KOS 3020) 


100 


MINE EYES HAVE SEEN 

THE GLORY 99 

Anita Bryant (Columbia CL 2573/CS 9373) 


THE SEEDS 

(Crescendo GNP/GNPS 2023) 


HERE WHERE THERE IS LOVE 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter SRM/STS 555) 

IF I WERE A CARPENTER 
Bobby Darin (Atlantic M/S 8135) 

LATIN PULSE 

Nancy Ames (Epic LN 241 89/ BN 26189) 

SOUTH OF THE BORDER 
Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass 
(A&M LP/SP 108) 


BEST OF DEAN MARTIN 
(CapHol T/ST 2601) 


WARM AND TENDER SOUL 
Percy Sledge (Atlantic LP/SD 8132) 

JAY AND THE AMERICANS 
GREATEST HITS, VOL. 2 
(United Artists UAL 3S5S/UAS 6555) 

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL 

The Palm Beach Band Boys 
(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3734) 


LARA'S THEME 

Brass Ring (Dunhill D/DS 50012) 


120 

121 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 


SOMEBODY LIKE ME 

Eddy Arnold 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3715) 

DUSTY SPRINGFIELD'S GOLDEN 
Philips PHM 220-220/PHS 600-220) 

HI HO EVERYBODY 

Rudy Vallee (Viva 6005/36005) 

THE EXCITING WILSON PtCKETT 
(Atlantic 8129/SD 8129) 

HOW SWEET IT IS 

Jackie Gleason (Capitol SW 2583) 


HITS 


131 

132 

133 

134 


FROM NASHVILLE WITH LOVE 
Chet Atkins (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3647) 

GO AHEAD AND CRY 

Righteous Bros. (Verve V/V-6 5004) 


DICTIONARY OF SOUL 
Otis Redding (Volt M/S 415) 


MORE I CANNOT WISH YOU 
Ed Ames (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3636) 

PERRY COMO IN ITALY 
(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3608) 

GLEN YARBROUGH LIVE AT THE 
HUNGRY I 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3661) 


YOU AIN'T WOMAN ENOUGH 
Loretta Lynn (Decca/DL 4783/DL 478) 

PSYCHOTIC REACTION 

Count Five (Double Shot DSM-1001) 

A HEART FILLED WITH SONG 
John Gary (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3666) 

BEATLE COUNTRY 

Charles River Valley Boys 
(Elektra EKL 4006 /EKS 74006) 


135 

136 

137 

138 

139 


KINK'S GREATEST HITS 
(Reprise R/RC 6217) 


IS PARIS BURNING 

Soundtrack (Columbia OL 6630/OS 3030) 

PETER, PAUL & MARY ALBUM 

(Warner Bros. W/WS 1648) 


140 


SWEET PEA 

Tommy Roe (ABC Paramount M/S 575) 

ROUGH 'N' TUMBLE 

Stanley Turrentins 
(Bluenote BLP 4240/BST 84240) 

CARLA 

Carla Thomas (Stax 709/SD 709) 




COMPILED BY CASH BOX FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS • Indicotes Strong Upword Mere 





ALBUM INVENTORY ; 

A check list of best selling pop albums other than those appearing on the CASH BOX Top 100 Album chart. Feature is designed to call wholesalers’ & retailers’ attention i 
to key catalog, top steady selling LP’s, as well as recent chart hits still going strong in sales. Information is supplied by manufacturers. This is a weekly, revolving i 
list presented in alphabetical order. It Is advised that this card be kept untii the list returns to this alphabetical section. ' 


TOWER 


Dick Curless 

A Tombstone Every Mile 

ST5005/T5005 


Dean Martm 

The Lush Years 

ST5006/T5006 


Justin Wilson 

1 Gawr-on-tee 

W5008 


Justin Wilson 

Wilsonville U.S. And A 

W5009 


Justin Wilson 

The “Wondermus" Humor of 

W5010 


Justin Wilson 

“Me, 1 got a Frien’ ” 

W5011 


Justin Wilson 

Whoooo Boy 

W5039 


Dick Curless 

The Soul of Dick Curless 

T5013/ST5013 


Dick Curless 

Travelin' Man 

T5015/ST5015 


Dean Martin 

Relaxin’ 

T5018/ST5018 


Dick Curless & 

A Devil Like Me Needs 

T5025/ST5025 


Kay Adams 

an Angel Like You 



The Standells 

Dirty Water 

T5027/ST5027 


Mae West 

Way Out West 

T5028/ST5028 


Maika & Joso 

Jewish Songs 

T5032/ST5032 


Kay Adams 

Wheels & Tears 

T5033/ST5033 


Dean Martin 

Happy In Love 

T5036/ST5036 


The Louvin Brothers 

Two Different Worlds 

T5038/ST5038 


Various 

The Canticle of the Gift 

T5040/ST5040 


Ian Whitcomb 

Ian Whitcomb’s Mod Mod Music Hall 

T5042/ST5042 


Various 

The Wild Angels 

T5043/ST5043 


Standells 

Why Pick On Me 

T5044/ST5044 


Various 

Country Opera 




Legend Of Johnny Brown 

T5045/ST5045 


Beatles 

Marching With The Beatles 

T5046/ST5046 


Walter Wanderly 

From Rio With Love 

T5047/ST5047 


The Crusaders 

Make A Joyful Noise With 



Drums and Guitars 

T5048'ST5048 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Jay And The Americans 

Jay And The Americans Greatest Hits 

3453 

6453 

Del Reeves 

Gettin’ Any Feed For Your Chickens 

3530 

6530 

Original Soundtrack 

Hawaii 

4143 

5143 

Ferrante And Teicher 

You Asked For It! 

3526 

6526 

Original Soundtrack 

A Funny Thing Happened On The 




Way To The Forum 

4144 

5144 

Jay And The Americans 

Livin’ Above Your Head 

3534 

6534 

Original Soundtrack 

Return Of The Seven 

4146 

5146 

Original Soundtrack 

Goldfinger 

4117 

5117 

The Beatles 

A Hard Day’s Night 

3366 

6366 

Various Artists 

Music To Read James Bond By Vol. II 

3541 

6541 

Shirley Bassey 

Shirley Means Bassey 

3545 

6545 

George Jones 

George Jones’ Golden Hits 

3532 

6532 

Jimmy Rosetli 

The Italian Album 

3544 

6544 

Al Caiola 

Caiola Romantico 

3527 

6527 

Ray Baretto 

El ‘Ray’ Criollo 

3543 

6543 

Original Soundtrack 

Khartoum 

4140 

5140 

Pat Cooper 

Our Hero-Pat Cooper 

3446 

— 

Jimmy Roselli 

Right From The Heart 

3529 

6529 

Jay And The Americans 

Jay And The Americans Greatest Hits 




Vol. II 

3555 

6555 

Original Soundtrack 

A Man And A Woman 

4147 

5147 

George Martin 

George Martin Instrumentally Salutes 




The Beetle Girls 

3539 

6539 

Pat Cooper 

Spaghetti Sauce And Other Delights 

3548 

— 

Manfred Mann 

Manfred Mann’s Greatest Hits 

3551 

6551 

Bobby Goldsboro 

Blue Autumn 

3552 

6552 

Count Basie 

Basie Meets Bond 

3480 

6480 

Al Caiola 

All Strung Out! 

3553 

6553 

The Oak Ridge Boys 

The Oak Ridge Boys At Their Best! 

3554 

6554 

Lena Home 

Lena InHollywood 

3470 

6470 

Original Soundtrack 

After The Fox 

4148 

5148 

Patty Duke 

Patty Duke’s Greatest Hits 

3535 

6535 


VANGUARD ' 

« 


Joan Baez 

Farewell, Angelina 

VRS-9200 

VSD-79200 


Buffy Sainte-Marie 

Little Wheel, Spin and Spin 

VRS-9211 

VSD-79211 


Joan Baez 

Joan Baez/Five 

VRS-9160 

VSD-79160 


Joan Baez 

Joan Baez In Concert, Pt. 2 

VRS-9113 

VSD-2123 


Joan Baez 

Joan Baez In Concert 

VRS-9112 

VSD-2122 

r 

Joan Baez 

Joan Baez, Vol. 2 

VRS-9094 

VSD-2097 

1 

Peter Schickele 

An Hysteric Return Of P.D.Q. Bach 

VRS-9223 

VSD-79223 

j 

Jimmy Cotton Blues 
Quartet & The Otis 
Rush Blues Band 

Chicago/The Blues/Today, Vol. 2 

VRS-9217 

VSD-79217 

II 

I 

B 

Johnny Young’s South 
Side Blues Band 

Chicago/The Blues/Today, Vol. 3 

VRS-9218 

VSD-79218 

Junior Wells Chicago 
Blues Band J. B. 
Hutto And His Hawks 

Chicago/The Blues/Today, Vol. 1 

VRS-9216 

VSD-79216 

II 

II 

II 

Patrick Sky 

A Harvest Of Gentle Clang 

VRS-9207 

VSD-79207 


Ian And Sylvia 

Play One More 

VRS-9215 

VSD-79215 

1 

Ian And Sylvia 

Early Morning Rain 

VRS-9175 

VSD-79175 

I 

Buffy Sainte-Marie 

Many A Mile 

VRS-9171 

VSD-79171 

II 

Ian And Sylvia 

Northern Journey 

VRS-9154 

VSD-79154 

II 

Sandy Bull 

Inventions 

VRS-9191 

VSD-79191 

E 

Buffy Sainte-Marie 

It’s My Way 

VRS-9142 

VSD-79142 

Richard & Mimi Farina 

Reflections In A Crystal Wind 

VRS-9204 

VSD-79204 


Doc Watson 

Southbound 

VRS-9213 

VSD-79213 , 

1 

Jan Peerce 

Neopolitan Songs 

VRS-9210 

VSD-79210 

E 

E 


I 


VERVE 


Jimmy Smith 

1 Got My Mojo Workin’ 

V/V6/8641 

Wes Montgomery 

Goin’ Out of My Head 

V/V6/8642 

Astrud Gilberto 

Look to the Rainbow 

V/V6/8643 

Prysock/Basie 

Arthur Prysock/Count Basie 

V/V6/8646 

Ella Fitzgerald 

Mack The Knife-Ella In Berlin-La 



Fitzgerald 

VA6/4041 

Stan Getz/Charlie Byrd 

Bashin’-Jimmy Smith Plays "Walk On The 



Wild Side’’ 

VA6/8432 

Stan Getz/Joao Gilberto 

Getz/Gilberto 

VA6/8545 

Antonio Carlos Jobim 

Composer Of Desafinado Antonio Carlos 



Jobim, Plays 

VA6/8547 

Johnny Hodges/Wild Bill 


Davis 

Mess Of Blues 

V/V6/8570 

Cal Tjader 

Breeze From The East 

VA6/8575 

Jimmy Smith 

Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf 

VA6/8583 

Jimmy Smith 

The Cat 

V/V6/8587 

Johnny Hodges/Wild Bill 


Davis 

Blue Rabbit 

VA6/8599 

Stan Getz With Astrud 



Gilberto 

Getz Au Go Go 

V/V6/8600 

Gary MacFarland 

Soft Samba 

VA6/8603 

The Oscar Peterson Trio We Get Requests 

VA6/8606 

Astrud Gilberto 

The Astrud Gilberto Album 

VA6/9608 

Wes Montgomery 

Movin’ Wes 

VA6/8610 

Kenny Burrell/Gil Evans Guitar Forms 

VA6/8612 

Cal Tjader 

Soul Sauce 

VA6/8614 

Jnnmy Smith 

The Monster 

V/V6/8618 

Wes Montgomery 

Bumpin’ 

VA6/8625 

Astrud Gilberto 

The Shadow Of Your Smile 

VA6/8629 

Johnny Hodges/Wild Bill 


Davis 

Wings & Things 

VA6/8630 

Willie Bobo 

Spanish Grease 

VA6/8631 

Kai Winding 

More! 

VA6/8551 

Wes Montgomery 

Tequila 

VA6/8653 

Lalo Schifrin 

Marquis De Sade 

VA6/8654 

Walter Wanderly 

Rain Forest 

VA6/8658 

Count Basie 

Basie’s Beatle Bag 

VA6/8659 

Jimmy Smith 

Hoochie Cooche Man 

V/V6/8667 

Righteous Bros 

Soul & Inspiration 

VA6/5001 

Righteous Bros 

Go Ahead & Cry 

VA6/5004 

Mothers Of invention 

Freak Out 

VA6/5005-2 




Single: 


“The 

Lonely 

Bull” 

5-10109 

From the Epic album 
Something New 


The Glenn Miller Orchestra 


Albums: 



LN 24206/ BN 26206 


LN 24157/ BN 26157* 


THE WORLD FAMOUS 

GLENN 

MILLER 

ORCHESTRA 

UNDER THE DlRECTtOM OF 
RAYMcWNLEV WITH THE 
MOONLIGHT SEPENAOERS 

r GREAT 
SONGS 
OF THE 60’S 
GLENN MILLER 
TIME 



LN 24133/ BN 26133* 


s 

t 

I 


! 

I 

II 
I 

i , 

I 

I ' 

I 
I 
I 


1 

■< 

1 

I . 

I , 

I 


'■'Stereo 


©“EPIC”, Marca Reg. T.M. PRINTED IN U.S.A. 


t 



W;\TeH OUTS 

•FOR THE NS ] BEST NEIUCOMER BAND* 

BAM MAfimU BAND 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 






MERCURY’S TOYS — The latest acquisition to Mercury’s artist roster is the 
Toys, primarily known for their while-back “Lover’s Concerto’’ and “Attack” 
decks. The female trio was brought to Mercury by producer-arranger Alan 
Lorber, who will supervise their sessions. Lorber and the Toy’s manager Vince 
Marc negotiated the pact with Charlie Each, Mercury’s vice president and 
director of recorded product. Pictured above (left to right) are: Barbara 
Parrott, Bai’bara Hai'ris, ami June Monteiro (who comprise the Toys), 
Charlie Fach, Felix ZifFer (the Toys’ attorney), Alan Lorber, and Vince Marc. 


Western Union Singing 
Telegrams Now On Disks 

NEW YORK — A new singing dis- 
covery, John Gorman, has been intro- 
duced into the world of records and, 
with ten disks already cut, his pro- 
jected sales have been placed at 
nearly a million a year by the label. 
However, it’s highly improbable that 
Gorman will ever receive a gold rec- 
ord as a result of any of the ten sides 
cut. The reason for this is that the 
label, known as MelodyGram, is a 
wing of Western Union and each of 
the Gorman tracks is a different sing- 
ing telegram. A unique social greet- 
ing, MelodyGram combines a persona- 
lized telegraphic message, a deluxe 
greeting card and a Gorman record- 
ing for play at SSVs rpm. In addition 
to an original tune commissioned by 
Western Union, and titled “I Want To 
Communicate With You,” the record- 
ings include “Happy Birthday,” 
“Everything’s Coming Up Roses,” 
“Little Boy Congratulations,” “Little 
Girl Congratulations,” “Hello Dolly,” 
“Love And Marriage,” “Anniversary 
Waltz,” “Do I Love You” and “I Wish 
You Love.” 

MelodyGrams for immediate de- 
livery coast-to-coast cost $3, while 
those for next-day wire-mail delivery, 
anywhere in the country, are $2.2.5. 

Starnell Associates 
Signs Tony Sara 

NEW YORK — Starnell Associates, 
New York based artists representa- 
tives, is now embarked on what it 
terms an “Open Door Policy” in the 
signing of new talent for records, TV 
and nightclubs. That policy, reports 
the company, has already reaped re- 
wards in the case of Tony Sara, a 
singer-songwriter newcomer whose 
first effort on the Starnell owned 
Marney Records is “Love Sick Beg- 
gar.” Sara is a recently returned 
decorated combat veteran from Viet 
Nam. Starnell chief Sidney Lucas, 
says they also purchase independent 
masters for their Marney label. 



MEET ME IN —A musical 

souvenir LP of St. Louis has just 
been released by Norman Records. 
The new album is entitled, “Meet Me 
In St. Louis” and is dramatized in 
three parts: the Riverfront, Down- 
town, and Forest Park. The set was 
produced by Norman Wienstroer and 
the location recording was done by A1 
Bussen of Technisonic Studios, St. 
Louis. The accom photo above shows 
Norman Wienstroer (left), president 
of Norman Records, presenting the 
first copy of the LP to A. J. Cervan- 
tes, mayor of St. Louis. Robert 
Hausfater (right) is prexy of Roberts 
Distributing, the firm that will handle 
distribution of the deck in the St. 
Louis area. 


Morris I. Auerbach Dies 

NEW YORK— Morris 1. Auerbach 
died last week in New York of a 
heart attack. He was 60 years old. 
He was in the music business for 40 
years, and he owned Municipal Radio 
in Brooklyn. He began his career in 
radio research. His wife, Pauline, will 
carry on the business. 

Auerbach is survived by a son, 
Richard, an electrical engineer, and a 
daughter, Merle, a school teacher. 

Capitol Booking 
Books B. J. Thomas 

NEW YORK— A B. J. Thomas ad on 
page 35 of last week’s Year-End issue 
contained an incorrect booking agent 
for the performer. It should be Capi- 
tol Booking Corp., 527 Madison Ave., 
New York. Telephone is (212) 421- 
9.590. 



How's Hawaii? 

Elmer Bernstein, com- 
poser and conductor of 
many motion picture 
soundtracks scores, stop- 
ped by the New York 
offices of United Artists 
last week to check the 
progress of his recently 
released LP, “Hawaii.” 
Bernstein did the score 
for the UA flick, which 
'tars Julie Andrews and 
Max Von Sydow. Lloyd 
Leipzig (left) UA’s di- 
rector of creative ser- 
vices, and his assistant, 
Bill Persch (right) flank 
the composer. 


Fowley Returns To Coast 

HOLLYWOOD — Kim Fowley, London 
based publisher-producer-writer-art- 
ist, returned recently to the west 
c^'a'^t in the U.S. to re-open offices at 
6000 Sunset Boulevard. 

Fowley’s copyrights have been re- 
corded by such British acts as Man- 
fi-ed Mann, the Seekers, Cat Stevens, 
Paul Jones, the Cream, and the Bel- 
fast Gipsies. Fowley, who played 
hypeaphone on the MGM-Verve 
Mothers of Invention “Freak Out” LP, 
is an exclusive recording artist on 
Parlophone Records of England and 
Warner Bros. Records’ Loma division 
for U.S. A. -Canadian releases. 

Living Legend Music, a Kim Fow- 
ley-Ardmore and Beechwood Ltd. 
owned firm in London has overseas 
rights to ‘The Witch,” by the Sonics 
on Jerden Records. 

Fowley, in conjunction with Hank 
Levine and Larry Goldberg’s #1 
Productions, has in current release 
material by the Fire Escape, GPN- 
Crescendo Records, the In-Be-Tween, 
Highland Records, and Laughing 
Wind, Tower Records. 


UA Inks The Omen 

NEW YORK— The Omen, a New 
York rock quartet, have signed an 
exclusive disk contract with United 
Artists Records. 

Known to discotheque and teen 
club devotees throughout the New 
York metropolitan area, the Omen 
are in their early twenties, and write 
and arrange most of their own ma- 
terial. 

Under the co-direction of producers 
Jack Gold and Bill Hughes, the initial 
UA single from the vocal-instru- 
mental combo titled, “Once Upon A 
Taste,” is scheduled for release 
shortly by the label. 

UA is presently readying a sizeable 
publicity and promotional campaign 
for their new artists to coincide with 
the first release. 

In addition, a 90-minute farce 
melodrama film takes place in the 
1940’s and features the quartet is 
currently in production and is slated 
to be ready for release by Feb. 1. 


Jarre Recording 
'Grand Prix' Score 

HOLLYWOOD — Academy Award 
winning composer Maurice Jarre has 
scheduled the first series of recording 
sessions for the MGM-Cinerama pre- 
sentation of John Frankenheimer’s 
film “Grand Prix.” The music will be 
released on the MGM label. 

Jarre will conduct his original 
score with a full symphony orchestra 
at the MGM Culver City Studios. The 
composer won his Oscars for “Law- 
rence of Arabia” and “Doctor Zhiva- 
go,” and recently composed the score 
for “It Paris Burning?” 

“Grand Prix,” a Douglas and Lewis 
production, had its world premiere 
last week at the Warner Cinerama 
Theatre in New York. Starring James 
Garner, Eva Marie Saint, Yves Mon- 
tand, Toshiro Mifune, Brian Bedford, 
Jessica Walter, Antonio Sabato and 
Francoise Hardy, the film also opened 
at Pacific’s Cinerama Dome Theatre 
in Los Angeles and the Cinerama 
Theatre in Boston. 


Hickory Inks Two Acts 

NASHVILLE — Hickory Records added } 
two West Coasters to its expanding 
artist roster last week with the sign- 
ing of singer-songwriter Dorsey Bur- 
nette and of Gary Crosby, according 
to an announcement from label exec ^ 
W. D. Kilpatrick. 

Burnette and Crosby join a group ? 
which includes the Newbeats, Frank 
Ifield, Sue Thompson, The Overlan- 
ders, and the recently-signed Swingin’ 
Gentry Singers under the direction of ^ 
composer-arranger-conductor John 
Cacavas. 

Dorsey Burnette, who is the com- ’’ 
poser of the hit song “Tall Oak Tree,” 
joins Hickory under a special produc- ' 
tion arrangement whereby he will 
produce Gary Crosby’s disks for the \ 
label. Burnette has already sliced a 
pair of sides himself, and has pro- 
duced six sides with Crosby. First 
singles for both are due for release 
shortly after the first of the year. 1 

Coincidentally with his joining 
Hickory, Crosby has also been signed 
for a series of top TV guest appear- 
ances. , 


Music City Recorders 
Erects New Building 

NASHVILLE — The latest music build- 
ing to go up in Nashville’s “music 
row” area is that of Music City 
Recorders, located at 821 — 19th Ave- 
nue South. 

Already underway and scheduled 
for completion within about 45 days, 
the building is actually an addition 
to the recording studio’s present 
building. The addition, approximately 
50 by 75 feet, will include a modern 
brick, glass, and redwood “front” to 
the present building. 

The added space will, according to 
the company’s president. Bill Connor, 
allow Music City Recorders to offer 
“complete recording facilities com- 
petitive with any in the South — or the 
entire nation, for that matter.” 

Music City Recorders was founded 
by Connor in 1964, along with W. 
Scott Moore, the firm’s vice president. 
Both had a number of years experi- 
ence with other recording studios 
prior to this. 

The building addition will house 
the studio’s expanded 4-track record- 
ing facilities, now being installed, 
with provisions in the studio’s new 
custom-built console for immediate 
switching to eight-track stereo when 
needed. 


Jay-Gee Inks Bobby Lee 

NEW YORK — Jay-Gee Record Co. 
has signed Bobby Lee to an exclusive i 
recording contract. The artist was a 
member of a group called the Fiestas 
and wrote “So Fine,” recorded by 
that group. The effort became a major ^ 
hit. He later decided to go it alone 
and recorded two outings, “I Was 
Born A Loser,” and “I Missed It By , 
That Much.” According to Mickey 
Eichner, vice president of Jay-Gee, all i 
Bobby Lee’s dates for the label will 
be produced by Ramot Productions. . 



Flying Again 

The Spirit of St. Louis 
flies again as (left to 
right) Arnold Maxin, 
head of Big 3 Music 
(Robbins - Feist - Miller) 
and Jay Lowy, the pub- 
bery’s professional man- 
ager, get together with 
tunesmiths Abel Baer 
and L. Wolfe Gilbert to 
discuss the pop revival 
of “Lucky Lindy.” The 
Gilbert/Baer ditty was 
first launched in ’27 to 
celebrate the Lindbergh 
trans Atlantic hop and is 
currently logging time 
on Warner Bros, by 
Stutz Bearcat. 


40 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



|sf t-r 




OPEN UP YOUR HEART— Buck Owens & Bucka- 
roos — Capitol T/ST 2640 

Here’s another Buck Owens package that’s 
bound to follow in the wake of all its big money- 
making predecessors. Highlighting the set with 
his current smash, “Open Up Your Heart,” Buck 
and the Buckaroos uncork a whole passel of po- 
tent tracks, including the likes of his recent j 
giants, “Waitin’ In Your Welfare Line” and i 
“Think Of Me.” Stock up and stand me. 



MY HEART’S IN THE COUNTRY— Skeeter 
Davis— RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3667 

Opry favorite Skeeter Davis made lots of 
noise on the singles charts with her current 
outing called “Coin’ Down The Road,” and she j 
uses that same tune to highlight this package ! 
of country goodies. In addition to that chart ! 
item, Skeeter offers her own personable versions 
of other recent best sellers, including “You Ain’t 
Woman Enough,” “Guess My Eyes Were Bigger 
Than My Heart” and “Ain’t Had No Lovin’.” A | 
sure seller. 



NASHVILLE REBEL — Waylon Jennings — RCA 
Victor— LPM 3736/LSP 3736 (e) 

In the past year Waylon Jennings has con- 
quered country audiences with hit singles and 
albums and has recently displayed another of 
his talents, that of the motion picture actor. His 
newly-released film, “Nashville Rebel,” features 
an excellent C&W soundtrack, which is featured 
in this Victor LP. Among the tracks are “Silver 
Ribbons” and “Nashvdle Bums,” as well as the 
bonus “Norwegian Wood.” 




weicomsTo 



WELCOME TO MUSIC CITY U.S.A.— Various 
Artists — Columbia CL 2590/CS 9390 

Columbia has come up with a great package 
here for Opry fans. Fourteen name artists are 
represented on the set, including such favorites 
as Flatt & Scruggs (“Wabash Cannonball”), 
Claude King (“Wolverton Mountain”) and host 
Carl Smith (“Let’s Live A Little”) in a ‘live’ 
Nashville session. Should be good for excellent 
sales action. 


I 


TKEBRCWNS 










OUR KIND OF COUNTRY— Browns— RCA Vic- 
tor LPM/LSP 3668 

The silky smooth harmony of Bonnie, Maxine 
and Jim Edward Brown makes for another pack- 
age of fine listening in this their latest RCA 
Victor LP. A highly appetizing bill of fare is 
served up by the trio, highlighted by the group’s 
recent charter, “I’d Just Be Fool Enough,” and 
laced with a platterful of other goodies sure to 
please many a country fan. Great tracks in “Four 
Strong Winds” and “Where Does A Little Tear 
Come From.” 


THE COCKFIGHT AND OTHER TALL TALES 
— Archie Campbell — RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3699 
Country humor in the hands of inveterate 
funnyman Archie Campbell is the basis for this 
highly entertaining performance. Laughs fly 
thick and fast as the Opry comic speaks on mar- 
riage (“The New Marriage Ceremony”), modern 
day Romeo and Juliet (“The Martins And The 
Coys”) and includes his recent noisemaker “Golf, 
Golf, Golf.” Should be nice sales in store for the 
session. 





A TRIBUTE TO JIM REEVES— Arthur Smith 
Show— Dot DLP 3769/DLP 25769 
The entire cast of the Arthur Smith TV show 
has teamed up in this set to present a wonderful 
tribute to the late Jim Reeves. Highlighted by a 
half dozen past Reeves hits (“He’ll Have To Go,” 
“Four Walls,” “Is It Really Over”) the set also 
features a healthy portion of Arthur Smith origi- 
nals, like “Guitar Bounce” and “Robin Red- 
Breast Legend.” The wide appeal of the TV show 
gives the set a powerful springboard. 


CoA Box 


COUNTRY 
ROUND UP 


Here’s hoping that everyone in 
Countryland has had the happiest of 
Christmas holidays, especially those 
who were on the road and unable to 
be home with loved ones. But, 
whether you were on tour or home 
with the family and friends, we sin- 
cerely hope that your Christmas was 
as enjoyable as it could possibly have 
been. In addition, we here at Cash 
Box would like to wish each and every 
one of you a very Happy New Year, 
and a very successful one, too. May 
1967 bring only Bull’s-Eyes and chart 
records, and may the road be lined 
with packed houses and cheering 
crowds everywhere you go. May every 
record get a Golden Guitar and may 
every schedule be booked solid. May 
that once-in-a-lifetime song come 
your way and may each week bring 
another bullet. Most of all, may you 
be happy, and enjoy yourself in every- 
thing you do. 

While world leaders arrange sum- 
mit conferences to try to bring about 
a lasting peace, a batch of country 
musicmakers have been arranging 
there own “summit” in the Main Ball 
Room at Harrah’s in Reno, Nev. from 
Feb. 13-Mar. 1. Goodwill ambassadors 
from the length and breadth of Coun- 
trymusicland will be on hand to make 
things vibrate, including Roy Acuff, 
George Hamilton IV, Bob Luman, 
Marion Worth, the Stoney Mountain 
doggers, Lonzo & Oscar and, as a 
special envoy from Grinder’s Switch, 
Cousin Minnie Pearl. To quote Tandy 
Rice, “It a safe bet that any heads 
of state who happen to be in the 
audience can learn something about 
diplomacy and frienliness.” 

Congrats to Roger Sovine who has 
recently been named professional 
manager of Cedarwood. Associated 
with the firm since 1965, Roger suc- 
ceeds Jan Crutchfield to the post. 

What may appear to be part of a 
geography test is actually part of the 
promotion for the first release by one 
of RCA Victor’s brightest new 
signees. The artist is Ed Bruce, who 
has recently reactivated his entertain- 
ment career, and the song is “Walk- 
er’s Woods”, written by Kay Arnold 
and published by Combine Music. A 
contest to determine “Where Is Walk- 
er’s Woods?” is being conducted by 
the pubbery and, to encourage in- 
dividual imagination and opinion, 50 
first prizes will be awarded. “Walker’s 
Woods Kits”, will include a cotton- 
mouth moccasin, an alligator, and a 
supply of quick sand (would you be- 
lieve reasonable, synthetic facsimilies 
thereof ? ) . 


Stu Philips, an international coun- 
try favorite, has just completed a 
cycle in his career. Beginning on 
Canadian radio and TV while still in 
high school, his fame has spread to 
many countries and he has become a 
chart artist in the States for Victor. 
The cycle was recently completed by 
his return to Canada for a TV show 
as he taped the Bill Anderson Show 
on Dec. 12 and 13 in Windsor, Ont. 
Thus far, 1966 has been the biggest 
in Stu’s career, but it’s still not over 
yet. After the Canadian gig, the song- 
ster will bounce down to Chicago 
where he will appear on Dolph He- 
witt’s “WGN Barn Dance,” and then 
he will close out the year with a New 
Year’s Eve stand in Cincinnati on the 
syndicated “Midwestern Hayride” 
over WLW-TV. 


Swainsboro, Ga. is the operational 
base of the Denny-Pierce radio sta- 
tion chain and is therefore the loca- 
tion of the annual Christmas party 
for the chain, directed by manager 
Johnny Bailes. Guests from Nashville 
who left today for this year’s affair 


include Bill Denny, John Denny, Dolly 
Denny, Mr. and Mrs. Webb Pierce, 
and Max Powell. 

Sonny James left Music City on 
Nov. 23 and since that time, along 
with the Southern Gentlemen, he has 
toured from Pittsburg to Los Angeles 
and San Jose. Finally, on Dec. 20, he 
made it back to Nashville, but, in- 
stead of relaxing, 01’ Son went right 
to the studios to cut a new Capitol 
session on Dec. 21. His schedule also 
called for promotional appearances at 
two large Nashville department 
stores before eventually heading 
wearily to Hackelburg, Ala. Incident- 
ally, Sonny intends to be back at work 
in Music City on Dec. 27 to map out 
plans for 1967 with manager Bob 
Neal. 

We hear that “Big Sam” Wallace 
took one listen to Lorene Mann’s 
“Don’t Put Your Hands On Me” and 
called her long distance to tell her 
she had a hit. Wallace, head of Victor 
in Atlanta, was reportedly so excited 
that he immediately ran with it from 
radio stations to distributors, telling 
everyone to be on the lookout. A well- 
known figure in the music biz, “Big 
Sam” is supposedly an excellent 
barometer of things to come, record- 
wise. 

Jolly Joyce writes to tell us that 
Ray Pillow is in the midst of a busy 
j December tour of U.S. Army bases in 
Germany. In addition to Ray’s book- 
ings, the Jolly Joyce Agency will also 
be handling Deutschland appearances 
for Kitty Wells, Johnny Wright, Ruby 
Wright, Bill Philips and the Tennes- 
see Mountain Boys all in one package 
show for the month of January. For 
the following month, the firm will be 
booking Leroy Van Dyke and his 
band, while in April Joyce will handle 
Bill Anderson & the Po’ Boys and in 
j May, Faron Young & his Deputies. 

With several hit records, countless 
stage appearances and three movies 
under his belt, UA chanter Del Reeves 
has finally drawn the line on the 
lengths that one man can be forced 
to go for the sake of art. Recently 
seen in the movie, “Gold Guitar,” 
where he sang from the ledge of a 
tall building (with gale force winds 
whipping around him and no safety 
net below). Reeves is now filming 
“Cottonpickin’ Chickenpickers” in 
Florida, where, in one scene, he is 
supposed to wrestle with a more or 
less “tame” alligator. Paraphrasing 
the title of his current UA hit, Reeves 
commented “This Must Be The Bot- 
tom,” and politely declined any con- 
tact with the scaly monster. Producer 
Jackson is now trying to locate a rub- 
ber standin for the gator. Aside from 
the trials and tribulations of a Grand 
Ole Opry regular turned film star. 
Reeves is set for a healthy slate of 
personnal appearances throughout the 
coming year, beginning with a stop- 
over at Davenport, Iowa on New 
Year’s Day and a week’s stint at the 
Edison Hotel in Toronto, Canada from 
Jan. 9 thru 14. 


AN ALBUM 
MASTERPIECE 

KITTY 

X S ^ 

sings 

“A WOMAN NEVER FORGETS” 

DECCA #32024 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


41 





TOP COUNTRY 
ALBUMS 


1 YOU AIN'T WOMAN ENOUGH 2 i 

Loretta Lynn (Oteea DL 47$3/7 47i3) 

2 THE BEST OF SONNY JAMES 4 

(Capitol T/ST 2615) i 

3 SWINGIN' DOORS 1 s 

Marie Haggard (Capitol T/ST 2535) 

4 ALMOST PERSUADED 3 j 

Dayid Houston 

(Sple LN 2421 3 /BN 26213) 

s ANOTHER BRIDGE TO BURN 5 

Kay Price (Columbia CL 2528/CS 9328) 


6 THE LAST WORD IN 

LONESOME 6 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3622) 

7 LEAVIN' TOWN 12 

Waylon Jennings 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3620) 

8 NAT STUCKEY SINGS 14 

(Paula LP 2192) 

9 BORN TO SING 17 

Connie Smith (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3628) 

10 your sincerely 9 

Jim Reeves 

(RCA Victor LPM 3709/LSP 3709 E.) 

11 SOMEBODY LIKE ME 17 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 371S) 


12 WE FOUND HEAVEN RIGHT 

HERE ON EARTH AT 4033 16 

George Jones (Musicor MM 2106/MS 3106) 

13 DISTANT DRUMS 10 

Jim Reeves 

(RCA Victor LPM 3S42/LSP 3S42) 

14 CARNEGIE HALL CONCERT 8 

Suck Owens & Buckaroes 
(Capitol T/ST 2556) 

15 THE DRIFTER 11 

Marty Robbins 

(Columbia CL 2527 /CS 9327) 



16 HAPPINESS IS YOU 19 

Johnny Cash (Columbia CL 2537/CS 9337) i 

17 WHERE IS THE CIRCUS 20 

Hank Thompson 
(Warner Bros. W/WS 1664) 

18 A MILLION AND ONE 18 

Billy Walker 

(Monument MLP 8047/LSP 3507) 

19 I LOVE DROPS 15 I 

BUI Anderson (Dacca DL 4771/7 4771) \ 

20 the SEELY STYLE 22 

Jeannie Seely 

(Monument MLP 80S7/SLP 180S7) 

21 ALL'S FAIR IN LOVE 

AND WAR 26 j 

Stonewall Jackson 
(Columbia CL 2509/CS 9309) 

22 THERE GOES MY 

EVERYTHING 27 | 

Jack Greene (Decca DL 4845/7 4845) 

23 I'LL TAKE THE DOG 24 ! 

Jean Shepard & Ray Pillow j 

(Capitol ST/T 2537; 

24 FREE AND EASY 25 

Dave Dudley 

(Mercury MG 21098/SR 61098) 

25 GEORGE JONES GOLDEN HITS 1 3 

(United Artists PAL 3532 /U AS 6532) 

26 big ben strikes again 30 ! 

Ben Colder (MGM E/SE 4421) 

27 COUNTRY CHARLIE PRIDE 29 I 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3645) j 

28 the kitty wells show 23 : 

Various Artists (Decca DL 4831 /7 4831) 

29 IF THE WHOLE WORLD i 

STOPPED LOVIN' — 

Roy Drusky 

(Mercury MG 21097 SR 61097) , 

30 NORMA JEAN SINGS A 

TRIBUTE TO KITTY WELLS — 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3664) 

IIIIIIIIIIH^ 


COUNTRY 


Gash Box REVIEWS 


B+ very good 
B good 


C+ fair 
C mediocre 


THE CASH BOX 


buLlseye 



WHERE DOES THE GOOD TIMES GO (2:18) [Blue Book, BMI— Owens] 
THE WAY THAT I LOVE YOU (2:36) [Blue Book, BMI— Owens] 
BUCK OWENS (Capitol 5811) 

The Buck Owens bandwagon should be building up another head of 
steam and blazing a path sti-aight to the top for the umpteenth time. 
Make way for “Where Does The Good Times Go,” ’cause this easy- 
paced thumper’s gonna zoom. “The Way That I Love You” is a pretty 
charmer. 


ALL OF ME BELONGS TO YOU (2:16) [Blue Book, BMI— Haggard] 
MY SIDE OF THE NIGHT (2:15) [Blue Book, BMI— Curless] 
DICK CURLESS (Tower 306) 

Absent from the charts since his tale of “The Baron,” Dick Curless 
should be back in the scoring column in no time as a result of this 
number called “All Of Me Belongs To You.” Curless serves up a low- 
down, throbbing heartbreaker that’s sure to do well. “My Side Of The 
Night” is a shuffling tale of further woe. 


THE GEAR JAMMER AND THE HOBO (3:26) [Starday, BMI— Bond] 
SWEET NELLIE (1:55) [Starday, BMI— Hayes, Singer] 
JOHNNY BOND & RED SOVINE (Starday 790) 

Programmers should get a lot of reaction to this rib-tickling team-up 
effort by Johnny Bond and Red Sovine, along with the Giddyup Go 
Boys. ‘The Gear Jammer And The Hobo” is a Vaudeville-type comedy 
routine which the boys have yanked from a recently released LP. The 
Giddyup Go Boys offer an engaging instrumental on the flip. 


ROCKS IN MY HEAD (2:29) [Blue Book, BMI— Owens] 
TRAPPED (2:40) [Central Songs, BMI — Rhodes, Simpson] 

KAY ADAMS (Tower 305) 

Here’s Kay Adams back with what looks like another chart climber 
for her. Tabbed “Rocks In My Head,” this effort looks real good for 
lots of air action. Kay lets loose with a dual-track stomper that’s worth 
a listen. “Trapped” is another nicely handled blues bouncer. 


Newcomer Picks 


TOP TWENTY (1:59) [Four Star, BMI— Fuller] 

WALL TO WALL HEARTACHES (2:24) 

[Northern, ASCAP — Clarkson, Freed] 

CHERYLE THOMPSON (Decca 32066) 

Here’s a cute little offering by Cheryle Thompson that could put her 
in the spotlight real quick. Titled “Top Twenty,” this one tells of a 
gal who wants to be No. 1 in her boyfriend’s poll. Deserves a spin. “Wall 
To Wall Heartaches” is a change of pace to a slowed down blueser. 

IlllllllllllllllllillllllllllillllllllllllllllUlilii^ 


Corrections On C&W 
Top Male Vocalists 

NEW YORK — In last week’s Christ- 
mas special there were several errors 
in the country listings which call for 
correction. 

In the poll listing of the Top Male 
Vocalist, Buck Owens was listed as 
the No. 1 male vocalist and Eddy 
Arnold was listed in the No. 2 spot. 
In actuality, both artists were tied 
for the No. 1 position. The error also 
caused other artists to be placed im- 
properly in the top 5. I 

The listings read: No. 1 — Buck I 
Owens, No. 2 — Eddy Arnold, No. 3— 
Jim Reeves, No. 4 — Sonny James, No. 
5— Roger Miller. The proper listing 
should be : No. 1 — Buck Owens & 
Eddy Arnold, No. 2 — Jim Reeves, No. 

3 — Sonny James, No. 4 — George 
Jones, No. 5 — Roger Miller, etc. 
George Jones, who placed No. 4 was 
inadvertently omitted from the list- 
ings. 


Hank Thompson/Falst-aff 
Endorsement Pact Renewed 

INDEPENDENCE, KAN. — Hank 
TJ ompson has renewed his personal 
e:.dorsement contract with the Fal- 
staff Brewing Corporation. Thompson 
snd his Brazos Valloy Boys rocontly 
cut a new series of radio commercials 
for Falstaff. 


Starday Signs 
George Morgan 

NASHVILLE — Starday Records 
president Don Pierce has announced 
that the label has signed country 
songster George Morgan to a record- 
ing contract. Formerly with Colum- 
bia, Morgan has had an illustrious 
career in records, with such memor- 
able hits as “Candy Kisses,” “Room 
Full Of Roses,” “Cry Baby Heart,” 
and many others. 

Pierce announced immediate ses- 
sions for Morgan, who’ll be working ; 
with Starday’s A&R chief, Tommy , 
Hill, and who will be joining a roster 
that includes Johnny Bond, the Willis j 
Brothers, Red Sovine and Minnie 1 
Pearl, to name a few. 

An all-out campaign is being ; 
planned by merchandising sales and 
promo department heads Hal Neely, 
Jim Wilson and Charlie Dick to kick 
off Morgan’s first single for the label, 
which is due in Jan., and an album, 
which is set for Feb. 

When asked about his switch, Mor- 
gan was quoted as saying “I like to 
be with a label that specializes in my 
kind of music.” He went on to say 
that his parting from Columbia was 
an amicable one. ; 


TEXAS TROUBADORS 

(Decca 32065) 

(B4-) WALKING THE FLOOR 
OVER YOU (1:47) [Noma, 
BMI — Tubb] The Texas Troubadors 
serve up a wild sampling of the 
Ernest Tubb standard which should 
score well with the boys’ fans. 

(B) E. T. BLUES (2:00) [Win- 
dow, BMI — Rhodes, Charleton] 
Another excellent Tubb-ful on the flip. 


CHUCK JENNINGS (Up-Beat 5533) 

(B-f) ECHO OF YOUR FOOT- 
STEPS (2:10) [Floyd Davis, 
BMI — Davis] Chuck Jennings could 
stir up nice action with this sad-sound- 
ing stanza of a man whose gal exits 
stage left. 

(B) I SEE THINGS THE OTHER 
WAY (2:35) [Floyd Davis, 
BMI — Davis] Another gal takes a 
powder on this side. 


HAL PHILLIPS (Silver Star 1015) 

(B-f) GIRL FROM AB ILENE 
(2:12) [Tree, BMI — Crutch- 
field] Boasting and bragging are the 
cause of Hal Phillips downfall in this 
bouncy, low-key heartbreaker. May do 
healthy business. 

(B) CRYING IS THE FASHION 
(2:10) [Silver Star, BMI— 
Phillips, Brewer] Tears fill up the 
grooves on this pretty blueser. Equal- 
ly attractive outing. 


TERRY BRAND (Trend 1021) 

(B-f) THE PAPER I HAD SIGNED 
(2:22) [Mimic, BMI— King] 
Terry Brand may make a name for 
himself as a result of this tale of 
shattered romance with a Reno ending. 

(B) I CAN’T HAVE YOU (1:50) 
[Mimic, BMI — Skipper] On 
this side the songster serves up 
blues with a bounce. 


Good Will Tour 

The gospel-s i n g i n g 
Prophets have been busy 
of late on the personal 
appearance trail, but 
they still have time for 
missions of mercy. 
Shown above, the boys 
take time out to visit 
wounded Viet Nam vet- 
ara.iis hospitalized at Ft. 
Campbell, Ky. 



' 42 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 




There's no catching him now! 


Merle Haggard 


THE FUGITIVE 



b/w Someone Told My Story/ 5803 

This single is going to make a lot of C&W hay. 
A gi’eat song . . . sung by a great artist. 
Put Merle Haggard on your most-wanted list. 


Publishing: FOUR STAR MUSIC COMPANY 806 17th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee 

Management: Jack McFadden OMAC Artist Corp. 403 Chester Ave., Bakersfield, California 
Telephone: 805 FA 77201 or FA 71000 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



COUNTRY 


10 


15 


Pos. Last 
Week 

THERE GOES MY EVERYTHING 

IBIuecr&sf — BMIJ 2 

Jock Greene (Decca 32023) 

SOMEBODY LIKE ME 

(Barron — BMI) 1 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor S869) 

TOUCH MY HEART 

(Mayhew — BMf) 3 

Ray Price (Columbia 43795) 

DON'T COME HOME A-DRINKIN' 
(With Lovin' On Your Mind) 

^Sure Fire — BMI] 7 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32045) 

THE HURTIN'S ALL OVER 

(Wilderness — BMI) 4 

Conn/e Smith (RCA Victor 8964) 

GAMES OF TRIANGLES 

fDe/more — ASCAP) 6 

Bobby Bare, Norma Jean & Liz Anderson 
(RCA Victor 8963) 

I GET THE FEVER 

^Sfo//fon — BM/j 5 

Bill Anderson (Decca 31999) 

UNMITIGATED GALL 

^Ce<Jofwood — BMI) 9 

Faron Young (Mercury 72617) 

MISTY BLUE 

fTo/monf — BMI) 11 

Wilma Burgess (Decca 32027) 

SWEET THANG 

(Su-Ma—BMI) 8 i 

Not Stuckey (Paula 243) : 

STAND BESIDE ME | 

(Glaser — 6M/j 14 | 

Jimmy Dean (RCA Victor 8971) 

HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN 

(Southtown — BMI I 

Bobby Lewis (United Artists 50067) 

FUNNY, FAMILIAR, 

FORGOTTEN FEELING 

(Acuff-Rose — BMI) 

Don Gibson (RCA Victor 8975) 

MR. SHORTY 

( Mariposa — RA4 / j 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 43870) 

OPEN UP YOUR HEART 

(Blue Book— BMI) 

Buck Owens (Capitol 5705) 


(Pamper — BMI) 

Webb Pierce (Decca 32033) 

17 STATESIDE 

I Cedarwood — BA4 / J 

Mel Tillis (Kapp 772) 

18 ALMOST PERSUADED #2 

(Al Gollico — BMI) 

Ben Colder fMGM 13590) 

19 MOTEL TIME AGAIN 

(Central Songs — BMI) 

Johnny Paycheck (Utile Darlin' 0016) 

20 THE BOTTLE LET ME DOWN 

fB/ue Boole — BMI) 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 5704) 

21 WHERE IS THE CIRCUS 

(Brazos Valley — BMI) 

Hank Thompson (Warner Bros. 5858) 

ANOTHER STORY, ANOTHER 
TIME, ANOTHER PLACE 

(Marson — BMI) 

Ernest Tubb (Decca 32022) 

23 THIS MUST BE THE BOTTOM 

(MosS‘Rose — BMI) 

Del Reeves (United Artists 50081) 

24 WHERE COULD I GO? 

(But To Her) 

(A) Galileo — BMI) 

David Houston (Epic 10102) 

25 IF THE WHOLE WORLD 
STOPPED LOVING 

( Fingerlake — BM I ) 

Ray Drusky (Mercury 72627) 


29 


31 


32 


33 


34 


3 

37 

38 


22 


40 


16 WHERE'D YOU STAY LAST NIGHT 


42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


Pos. Last 
Week 

BEAR WITH ME 
A LITTLE LONGER 

(Hill S Range— BMI) 31 

Billy Walker (Monument 980) 

WIFE OF THE PARTY 

(Yanah, Greenback — BMI) 32 

Liz Anderson (RCA Victor 8999) 

LOSER'S CATHEDRAL 

(Al Gollico— BMI) 39 

David Houston (Epic 10102) 

APARTMENT #9 

(Mayhew — BMI) 19 

Bobby Austin (Tally 500) 

ONCE 

(Harbot—SESAC) 38 

Ferlin Husky (Capitol 5775) 

DON'T LET THAT 
DOORKNOB HIT YOU 

(Acclaim — BMI) 34 

Norma Jean (RCA Victor 8989) 

OUR SIDE 

(Bumper — 6M/j 35 

Van Trevor (Band Box 371) 

A WOMAN NEVER FORGETS 

(Cedarwood — BMI) 30 

Kitty Wells (Decca 32024) 

CALL HER YOUR SWEETHEART 

(Acuff-Rose — f^MI) 33 

Frank (field (Hickory 1411) 

HURT HER ONCE FOR ME 

(Sure Fire — BM/) 43 

Wilburn Bros. (Decca 32038) 

YOU BEAT ALL I EVER SAW 

Johnny Cash (Columbia) 45 

RIDE, RIDE, RIDE 

(Yonah-BMI) 42 

Lynn Anderson (Chart 1375) 

BURNING BRIDGES 

tSoge & Sond-SESAC) 44 

Glen Campbell (Capitol 5773) 

SEVEN DAYS OF CRYING 
(MAKES ONE WEAK) 

(Southtown — Bt^'l 50 

Harden Trio (Columbia 43844) 

FUGITIVE 

(Eour Star— BMI) 48 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 5803) 

TEARS WILL BE THE CHASER 
FOR YOUR WINE 

/Tree— BMI) 46 

Wanda Jackson (Capitol) 

I NEVER HAD THE ONE 
I WANTED 

(Vanio—BMI) 51 

Claude Gray (Decca 32039) 

WHAT'S COME OVER MY BABY 

(Tree— BMI) 53 

Dottie West (RCA Victor 9011) 

THE FIRST WORD 

(Vintage— BMI) — 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 9027) 

JUST BETWEEN YOU AND ME 

(Jock— BMI) 47 

Charlie Pride (RCA Victor 9000) 

HULA LOVE 

(Mon-BMI) 52 

Hank Snow (RCA Victor 9012) 

THAT'LL BE THE DAY 

(Sou-hwInd—BMI) 49 

Statler Brothers (Columbia 43868) 

A WANDERIN' MAN 

(Pamper — BMI) 54 

Jeannie Seely (Monument 987) 

THE REAL THING 

(Newkeys — BMI) — 

Billy Grammer (Epic 10103) 

COUNTRY BOY'S DREAM 

(Cedarwood — BMI) 55 

Carl Perkins (Dollie 505) 


51 SOMEONE TOLD MY STORY 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 5803) 

52 GREEN RIVER 

Waylon Jennings (RCA Victor 9025) 

53 MR. DO-IT-YOURSELF 

Jeon Shepard & Ray Pillow (Capitol 5769) 

54 HAPPY TRACKS 

Kenny Price (Boone 1051) 

r.3 UTTLE THINGS EVERY GIRL 
SI vULD KNOW 
Claude King (Columbia 43867) 

iiiilllllllliiillilillilllllllllllllll 


56 HEAVEN HELP THIS HEART OF MINE 

Billy Grammer (Epic 10103) 

57 APARTMENT #9 

Tammy Wynette (Epic 10095) 

58 HEART FULL OF LOVE 

Johnny Dallas (Little Darlin' 0013) 

59 SAD FACE 

Ernie Ashworth (Hickory 1428) 

60 ONE DREAM 

Slim Whitman (Imperial 66212) 


‘ Heart Full of Love !' 

b/yy "Gray Flannel World" 
LD-013 



gene moooslin produotions 






44 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


r 




December 31, 1966 




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■) 

i 

■ J 


k t 

‘ \ 



I 


'* 



Herman's Hermits, currently on their fourth American tour, are one of Britain's most successful exports. Their latest Columbia single "East West" as well as giving 
them another transatlantic smash has also taken them into the Top Ten charts around the world. “No Milk Today" was recently voted Top Pop Song by juries from 
Britain, Norway, Finland, Sweden, Spain and Belgium. 









BRITAIN 



Sales of grammaphone records in September, the first month of the Autumn 
releases, totalled £2,168,000, 2% less than the same month of 1965. Home sales 
fell by 10% but export sales (which accounted for about 21% of the total) 
shot up b:^ 52%. Despite the drop in singles sales during the year, taking the 
fii-st nine months as a whole, total sales increased by 2% compared with the 
corresponding period of 1965. Export sales, representing 16% of the total, 
were up by 11% but home sales, alas, increased by less than 1%. Total pro- 
duction for the first nine months of the year was 4%% lower than in the 
same period last year. Eleven per cent fewer 45 r.p.m. disks were produced 
but LP production rose by 9%. 

Britain’s entry for the Eurovision Song Contest to be held in Vienna on 
April 8th will be chosen from five songs selected by a committee of the Music 
Publishers Association from 122 entries, all of which were submitted anony- 
mously. Sandie Shaw will sing the numbers in five programs of “The Rolf 
Harris Show” commencing Jan. 21st. As in previous years, viewers will vote 
by post card for the winning song. The songs are: 

“Ask Any Woman” by Jimmy Stewart and Gerry Langley (published by 
Mills); “Pll Cry Myself To Sleep” by Roger Webb (published by Jemb Music); 
“Tell The Boys” by Mitch Murray and Peter Callander (published by Shapiro 
Bernstein); “Puppet On A String” by Bill Martin and Phil Coulter (published 
by DPM Music); “Had A Dream Last Night” by Chris Andrews (published 
by Fortissimo MUsic). 

Tamla Motown star Jimmy Ruffin, accompanied by label boss Barney Ales, 
flew into London recently and were guests of honor at a reception given by 
E.M.I. Records to celebrate Ruffin’s first entry into the British hit parade with 
“What Becomes Of The Broken Hearted.” During his week’s stay, Ruffin 
appeared on BBCTV’s “Top Of The Pops” and filmed an insert for his follow- 
up disk “I’ve Passed This Way Before” just issued in the States. 

Geoffrey Bridge, managing director of EMI Records, accompanied by Rex 
Oldfield, general manager Licensed Repertoii-e Division, recently visited the 
United States where they extended for three years their licensing deal with 
the Amy Mala label. Bridge and Oldfield also had discussions with A1 Bennett, 
president of Liberty Records, regarding future releases of their product. 

Australian pop star Normie Rowe, with his first British single “It’s Not 
Easy” released on Polydor, flew home for Christmas in the sun. By the time 
he returns early in 1967, his Australian backing group the Playboys will be 
in Britain to accompany him on future recordings and to appear as an inde- 
pendent group. 

Top recording star Georgie Fame has left the Columbia label and signed a 
five-year recording contract with CBS. The company plan to put him in the 
studio early in 1967 to cut his first single. CBS are reported to have paid 
handsomely for the services of Fame whose past hits include “Yeh Yeh,” 
“Get Away” and “Sunny.” CBS also may have a new single by Sandy Posey — 
“Single Girl.” Her previous single “Born A Woman” — although failing to get 
into the Top Twenty — registered good sales. Willie Bobo has waxed his version 
of “Sunshine Superman” for CBS. 

Recent \isitor to London Mrs. Guerrini of Milan, vice president of the 
newly-formed Rentier Recording Company and publishing firm Guerrini 
(Jrouppo Editoriale. Mrs. Guerrini completed a deal with Baldwin Burns & 
Company to distribute their British-manufactured guitars and amplifiers in 
Italy. 

The Monkees TV series begins on Dec. 31st, and a month later RCA \’ictor 
issue their current American smash “I’m A Believer.” Their previous U.S. 
chart topper “Last Train To Clarksville” — although a million seller in America 
— failed to click here. Nevertheless, their latest single backed by TV exposure 
may solve the ‘Monkee’ puzzle and take them into the British charts. 

Robert Stigwood, manager of British group the Cream, currently in New 
York setting up radio and TV dates to meet Ahmet Ertegun of Atlantic Rec- 
ords, U.S. distributor of the group’s British label Reaction.^ 

French indie A&R managers Alain Boublil and Jacques Wolfsohn in London 
visiting Pye Records for discussions regarding future English recordings by 
their artists Antoine, Francois Hardy and Jacques Dutronc. Dutronc will be 
here in Jan. to cut English versions of his current French charter “Les 
Playboys.” . 

The oddly-titled psychedelic American hit “The Eggplant That Ate Chicago 
is about to eat its way through Britain on three labels. The original version 
by Dr. West’s Medicine Junk Band is released on CBS with cover versions by 
Professor Ernest Node and his Mug Jug Band on Columbia and Spencer’s 
Washboard Kings on Pye. . 

Quickies: Dave Miller of Budget Sounds, Inc., in London for talks with Pye 
Records managing director Louis Benjamin. . . . Spanish singer Raphael in 
London for BBC 2 TV “International Cabaret”. . . . Marlene Dietrich’s new 
Pye single “This World Of Ours” issued in US on Decca. . . . Rita Pavone 
visiting Britain early in Jan. promoting new single “You Only You” on RCA. 
. . . Ray Williams and Simon Hayes of Ace Public Relations are handling press 
and publicity for Brian Epstein’s Savilee Theatre. . . . “Green Green Grass Of 
Home” still topping Best Selling Sheet Music Lists for Burlington^ Music. . . . 
Brian Epstein’s New Year plans for the Saville Theatre include Billy Stewart 
(Feb. 5th), followed by Chuck Berry (Feb. 19th), Edwin Starr and Garnet 
Mimms (Feb. 26th), Lee Dorsey (March 5th) and the Impressions (April 
16th). . . . EMI hosted reception for American recording phenomenon Mrs. 
Miller here for TV appearances and to promote the unique “Miller sound.” 
Tom Jones “Green Green Grass Of Home” Decca recording no\v passed the 
half million mark. . . . Congratulations to Ted Heath celebrating his 21st 
anniversary as Big Band Leader. . . . Australian group the Twilights in Lon- 
don promoting “Needle In A Haystack,” a chart topper in their own country 
and issued here by EMI. . . . Publisher Jimmy Philips of K.P.M. Music was 
guest of honor at the Music Publishers Association Christmas luncheon which 
was attended by over 150 guests. 


Miu0M 

IS COMING 

CANNES 

fO JAN. 1967-4 FEB. 1967 


CBS' Boutet- Visits London 

PARIS — Philip Boutet of April Music 
and CBS Records in Paris flew to 
London recently where his copyright, 
“Le Soleil Blanc” by Tshuka, issued in 
France by CBS, has been covered in 
Britain by Valerie Masters on Poly- 
dor. Barbara Hayes of April Music 
London has the new Los Bravos 
single on Decca “Going Nowhere” 
Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” on 
Atlantic and “Cry Like A Baby” by 
Aretha Franklin on CBS. 


Germany and the music business are still in a state of semi-war with the 
radio stations here, and a reduced number of platters are crossing the radio 
turntables. Most of the stations have increased their record programming as 
of the 1st of January, but the fight is still not settled. Everyone is hoping that 
the disagreement will reach a final settlement early in the year and that things 
will return to normal, especially in the popularity and sales of German singles 
productions. One thing is certain. When a German language disk “clicks”, it 
outsells considerably its foreign counterpart. The trade paper “Music” with its 
analysis of their charts for 1966 showed 18 of the 20 top hits of the year to be 
foreign recoi-ds, but the top 2 were “Ganz In Weiss” (All In White) by Roy 
Black from Polydor (published by August Seith) and “Hundert Mann & Ein 
Befehl” (Ballad of the Green Berets) by Freddy Quinn from Polydor (pub- 
lished by Francis, Day and Hunter). 

Top artists chartwise here were the Beatles, Roy Black, Chris Andrews, the 
Rolling Stones, the Beach Boys, Dave Dee, Dozy Beaky, Mick & Tich, Freddy 
Quinn, Draft Deutscher, the Troggs and Nini Rosso. 

The record companies racking up the highest positions were in order: Teldec 
with 46 songs in the charts and 4969 points, Electrola with 31 songs making 
the listings and 4359 chart points, Polydor with 41 songs in the coveted list 
and 3963 points followed by CBS with 48 songs and 3694 points. Philips with 
32 songs and 3679 points, Deutsche Vogue with 22 songs and 2158 points, 
Ariola with 22 songs and 2158 points, and Metronome with 23 songs and 877 
points. 

Deutsche Grammophon takes over the Sonet-Storyville Scandinavian lables 
as of Jan. 1st. 

Ralph Siegel, Jr., is swinging with his Newbeats stateside disc “My Yester- 
day Love” which he wrote. The son of Ralph Maria Siegel is also making his 
mark locally with a new Dorthe recording which looks like it’s chartbound. In 
the meanwhile the publishing firm is swinging with “Distant Drums” in a 
German recording by Fred Bertelmann. 

.A1 Martino’s first visit to Germany seems to have paid off “in spades” for 
the artist’s I’ecordings for Electrola here. After appearing on a top TV broad- 
cast with “Spanish Eyes” and “Auf Wiedersehn” — both written by Bert 
Kaempfert — the songs started moving like mad salewise. Although “Spanish 
Eyes” made the charts here in Summer, the show started such a run on sales 
that immediate repressing of the record was necessary to keep up with orders. 
A1 made such a great impression on the German public that he now has offers 
for virtually every top TV show hei’e and will be back in May to fulfill TV 
and other shows. The question is only when he will start with German record- 
ings. 

GERMANY— BEST SELLERS OVER THE PAST 8 WEEKS 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


(Courtesy “Music”) 


Eine Handvoll Reis (A Hand Full Of Rice) — Freddy — 
Polydor — Edition Esplanade 

2 2 8 Bend It — Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich — Star Club 

— Minerva Music/R. Von Der Dovenmuhle 

3 3 8 Little Man — Sonny & Cher — Atlantic — Edition Intro/P. 

Meisel 

4 4 8 1 Can’t Control My.self — The Troggs — Hansa — Rolf Budde 

Music 

.3 .5 8 Dunja Du — Ronny — Telefunken — Idee Music 

6 6 5 Have You Seen Your Mother Baby, Standing In The Sha- 

dow — The Rolling Stones — Decca — Hans Gerig Music 

7 7 3 *Du Allein (You Alone) — Franz Beckenbauer — Polydor — 

Radio Music Int. 

8 8 8 ’-’Sag Mir Wie (Tell Me Ho\y) — Udo Juergens — Vogue— 

Montana Music/H. R. Beierlein 

9 9 3 ’-’Moderne Romanzen (Modern Romances) — Peter Alexander 

— Ariola — Hans Gerig Music 

10 10 5 Sunshine Superman — Donovan — Epic — Peer Music/T. See- 

ger 

GERMANY— JUKE BOX-RADIO-SALES FAVORITES 

This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 

(Courtesy “Automaten-Markt”) 

11 2 ’’Eine Handvoll Reis (A Hand Full Of Rice) — Fz'eddy — Poly- 

dor — Edition Esplanade 

2 2 2 ’^Moderne Romanzen (Modern Romances) — Peter Alexander 

— Ariola — Hans Gerig Music 

3 3 7 Bend It — Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich — Star Club 

— Minerva Music/R. Von Der Dovenmuhle 

4 4 2 Augen Wie Zwei Sterne (That’s Nice) — Rex Gildo — Ariola 

— Edition Belmont 

5 5 7 ’’Wenn Du Einsam Bist (When You Are Lonely) — Ronny — 

Telefunken — Edition Marbot 

6 6 4 1 Can’t Control Myself— The Troggs— Hansa— Rolf Budde 

Music 

7 7 7 Little Man — Sonny & Cher — Atlantic — Edition Intro/ P. 

Meisel 

8 8 2 Mr. Cannibal — Andy Fisher — Vogue — Nero/Edition Intro/ 

P. Meisel 

9 9 7 ’’Sag Mir Wie (Tell Me How) — Udo Juergens— Vogue — 

Montana Music/H. R. Beierlein 

10 10 2 ’’Lass Den Dummen Kummer (Stop That Worrying) — 

Renate Kern — Polydor— Edition Maxim 
’’Original German Copyright 



NEGRAM - HOLLAND CORRECTION 

Unfortunately, because of a printer’s error, the wrong Negram ad appeared in the year-end 
issue. The correct ad appears on page 51 in this week's issue. 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966- 


-International Seclion 




Box 


InteiDationol News Beport 


French Musicians Strike Ends 


BBC Gets New Pop Program; 
Disks Spin Six Hours A Day 


PARIS — The strike of French musi- 
cians is ended. After three-and-a-half 
months, musicians and disk producers 
reached mutual agreement, the most 
important of which is the rise of the 


MILAN — Pier Quinto Carriaggi, head 
of GDI, was in Poland recently. Dur- 
ing his trip, he met one of the most 
outstanding singing talents of the 
East, Anna German. She is considered 
one of the best selling artists of 
Poland, Chechoslovakia, Hungary and 
Russia. 

Carriaggi signed a long term ex- 
clusive agreement with this song- 
stress for the entire western hemi- 


fee for a three hour recording session 
to 85 francs instead of 75. Further 
talks will take place in Jan. to iron 
out other problems that brought 
about the strike. 


sphere. She was introduced to Italian 
press representatives during a cock- 
tail party held in her honor in Milan, 
during a visit paid to Italy. She has 
recorded, in Milan, her first single, 
immediately released under the GDI 
label. 

A pact has ah-eady been concluded 
with San Remo organizers for the 
presentation of this songstress in the 
1967 San Remo contest. 


LONDON — The Government white 
paper on the future of broadcasting 
and TV in Britain, belatedly published 
last week, resolves the long-standing 
question concerning the future of 
radio in this country: commercial 
radio is out; and the BBC is in. 

By the time the anti-pirate bill be- 
comes law in July, 1967, the BBC will 
be broadcasting continuous pop music 
on 247 metres medium wave band. 
The Postmaster General makes it 
clear that the new BBC program, un- 
like the pirates, will be planned for 
family consumption, and not just 
teenagers. The pi-ogram will include 
six hours of records a day, and will 
be transmitted on weekdays from 
5:30 am to 7:30 pm and again from 
10 pm to 2 am, and for most of Sun- 
days. Additionally, the BBC is au- 


thorized to establish nine short range 
local stations on VHF to cover urban 
and rural areas all over the country. 

The Government indicates that 
these stations will be local in char- 
acter, and requests that local musi- 
cians are asked to provide “live” per- 
foimances. While permission to set up 
a series of local stations is a triumph 
for the BBC, it is viewed as blow to 
those who support commercial radio 
and pop pirates. However, because the 
BBC has been asked to conduct this 
experiment in local broadcasting, it 
implies no commitment that it would 
necessarily be asked to provide a per- 
manent service if it was decided to 
authorize one. The white paper also 
excludes a fourth TV channel for at 
least three years. 


CDIInks Top Polish Songstress 


Iramac Director To U.S. 


Pye’s ^Marble Arch^ Strikes Gold 


HOLLAND — S. Samama, director of 
one of Holland’s youngest and rapid 
growing record companies, Iramac, 
will be at the Wentworth-Hotel in 
New York City Jan. 6, for about two 
weeks, to conclude contracts with sev- 
eral U.S. labels and to have talks with 


U.S. A. companies for the representa- 
tion of the Iramac label in the U.S. 
and Canada. U.S. labels, not repre- 
sented yet over here, could contact 
Mr. Samama at the above mentioned 
hotel. 


LONDON — Bye’s low-priced Marble 
Arch series, originally put on the 
market in October 1964 primarily as a 
classical label, was activated on a 
wider scale in September this year, 
and since then over 800,000 albums 
have been sold ranging from pops to 
classics and retailing at 12/6d. 
($1.75). This figure, plus the 200,000 
sold before the label really got under- 
way, brings total sales of Marble 


Arch to over a million copies. This 
low-priced label now boasts a roster 
of top flight artists such as The 
Kinks, The Seai-chers, Chuck Berry, 
Lonnie Donegan, Ball-Barber-Bilk etc. 
The success of Marble Arch is seen as 
more remarkable in view of the fact 
that the series sells throup-h retailers 
not supermarkets etc. and under the 
normal five per cent return privilege. 



HERE I AM — Mrs. Miller was the guest of honor at a reception held for her 
at the EMI offices in London recently. The lark is pictured above as flanked by 
Geoffrey Bridge (left), managing director of EMI Records, and Sir Joseph 
Lockwood, chairman of EMI Ltd. Mrs. Miller was in Great Britain for appear- 
ances on Associated Rediffusion’s “The Frost Programme.” 


Sweden's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


10 — 


11 


Consolation (Hep Stars/Olga) Hep House AB, Sweden 
Vid Din Sida (Sven Ingvars/Svensk-American) Seven 
Brothers Music Inc./Edition Odeon, Sweden 
No Milk Today (Herman’s Hermits/Columbia) Ehrling & 
Lofvenholm AB, Sweden 

Puff The Magic Dragon (Fabulous Four/Hep House) Gehr- 
mans, Sweden 

Alex Is The Man (Ola & Janglers/Gazell) Sonet Music 
AB, Sweden 

Good Vibrations (Beach Boys/Capitol) Sweden Music AB, 
Sweden 

Marble Breaks And Iron Bends (Dee Jays/Hep House) 
Sweden Music AB, Sweden 

Slit Och Slang (Lucky Lips) (Siw Malmkvist/Metronome) 
Belinda (Scandinavia) AB, Sweden 

I Natt Jag Drdmde (Last Night I Had A Strangest 
Dream) (Hep Stars/Olga) Musikforlaget Essex AB, Swe- 
den 

Bad Boy (Beatles/Parlophone) Sonora Musikforlags AB, 
Sweden 

Local copyright 


Decca Finalizes London Confab 


LONDON — Decca Records is finalis- 
ing plans for the second London Rec- 
ords Sales Convention which will be 
held from Jan. 15 to 22. For the sec- 
ond year running Chairman, Sir Ed- 
ward Lewis, will play host to more 
than 140 key personnel of London 
Records America, the wholly owned 


subsidiary of the British company. An 
elaborate program of business and 
social events are being lined up in- 
cluding visits to the House of Com- 
mons and Windsor Castle as well as 
to some of London’s swingiest restau- 
rants and discotheques. 


Los Bravos Set For San Remo 


MILAN — Marino Marini, owner of the 
new diskery Tiffany Records, has an- 
nounced that the top group Los 
Bravos will perform on the stage of 
San Remo in the upcoming edition of 
the contest. 

Los Bravos are under exclusive dis- 
tribution for Italy with Tiffany Rec- 
ords. As in other countries of the 


world, their hit “Black Is Black” has 
reached top positions in Italy. 

In the meantime. Tiffany has re- 
leased the first LP of the group, Los 
Bravos are expected for a tour in 
Italy starting January 4. They will 
perform in the Sport Palace of Milan, 
Bologna, Rome and Genova. They will 
also act in all Piper Clubs of Italy. 



118 AT 25 — Decca Chairman Sir Edward Lewis recently presented 118 mem- 
bers of his staff with gold watches to commemorate twenty-five years service 
with the company. The recipients came from the record, radio and TV divisions 
of the group and between them accounted for over 2,950 years of service. Our 
picture shows Sir Edward (right) congratulating W. Townsley (a Director of 
the company) at the presentation ceremony. 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 — International Section 


47 




ARGENTINA 


Last week, we had a chat with Julio Korn’s topper Felix Lipesker, regarding , 
the recent reorganization of this pubbery. Lipesker stated that local publishing 
houses meet a somewhat hard financial situation due to the non-payment of 
royalties by SADAIC, and the fact that only 25% of these royalties go to the 
publisher (with 75% belonging to the composer) for local songs. According to 
Lipesker, SADAIC has been charging about 60% of the payments as adminis- ; 
tration costs. He added that the revamping will mean better business for | 
foreign publishers in 1967, since more of JK’s efforts will be devoted to these 
catalogs next year. 

RCA presented Palito Ortega with his second gold record at a cocktail party 
at the Golf Club last week. Palito has been extremely successful during the 
past five years with his singles, albums and films, both in Argentina and 
abroad. The gathering also served to present his new album, “Un Muchacho 
Como listed.” 

CBS infos that folk group Los Trovadores has been inked by Channel 13 for 
its giant “Sabados Circulares” program and is also expected to appear at the 
Cosquin Folk Music Festival next month. In 1967 they will tour several 
European countries. Another artist, Dino Alvarado, will perform on the same 
channel during all ’67 and is currently recording his second single. ; 

Odeon reports the release of an EP by Salvatore Adamo following the suc- 
cessful sales of his single. First sales of its “Coleccion Musical” series (featur- 
ing top local and international artists at budget prices) have been extremely [ 
satisfactory according to the label’s sales topper Abate. ' i 

Fermata infos that its album “14 with Tango” has been selling extremely | 
well during the first month of issue. The songs contained in the LP are being 
recorded by other artists, including Edmundo Rivero, who is waxing “En que 
Esquina te Encuentro Buenos Aires” for Philips, and Rodolfo Lesica, who will 
cut “Alejandra” for Odeon. Tango orkster Jose Basso will cut for Music Hall 
“Milonga de Albornoz.” 

Producciones F'^rmata is busy with hot releases. This week appeared “Love 
Me, Please Love Me” by Michel Poulnareff, and “L’Amour, Toujours L’Amour,” 
cut by Guy Mardel. From Brazil comes as a big potential hit “A Banda,” the 
Chico Buarque single that has already been showing sales in the Buenos Aires 
area. 

Melograf Publishers report that they control the twelve titles of the first 
Monkees’ album, just released by RCA in this country. The pubbery has also 

Argentina's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 


8 

9 

10 

11 


12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17 


18 

19 

20 


Last 

Week 

2 Funeral Del Labrador Barbara & Dick (RCA); Odette Lara 
(Trova) 

1 tin Homme Et Une Femme (United Artists) Soundtrack (United 
Artists) Eddie Barclay, Mireille Mathieu (Disc Jockey); Frank 
Pourcel (Odeon) 

4 Winchester Cathedral (Edami) New Happiness (CBS); Bull Dogs 
(RCA); New Vaudeville Band (Philips); Gus (Music Hall) 

3 Strangers In The Night (Fermata) Frank Sinatra (Reprise); Jose 
Feliciano, Living Brass, Vicky (RCA); Bert Kaempfert, Elio Roca, 
Los Claudios (Polydor); Luis Dimas, Marito (lonzalez (Music 
Hall); Andre (Phillips); Bud Shank (Trova); Dalida, Lucio Milena 
(Disc Jockey) 

5 Tutta La Gente (Ricordi) Ornella Vanoni (CBS) 

6 Yellow Submarine (Northern-Fermata) The Beatles, The Shakers 
Maurice Chevalier (Oden); The VIP’s (Ala-Nicky); Ronnie Montal- 
ban, Los In (CBS); The Knacks (Philips); Los Claudios (Polydor); 
Johnny Allon (Microfon) 

II Diritto D’Amare (Ricordi) Wilma Goich (CBS) 

Merci Cherie (Relay) Caravelli (CBS); Frank Pourcel (Odeon) 

'’El Equipo De Jose Carlos Argentino (Ala-Nicky) 

How Does That Grab You Darling? Nancy Sinatra (Reprise) 
Lara’s Theme (Neumann) Soundtrack, Singing Strings (MGM); 
Roger Williams (Kapp); Frank Pourcel (Odeon); Michael Monot, 
Lucio Milena (Disc Jockey); Ray Conniff (CBS); Bud Shank 
(Trova); A1 Korvin (Prodisa) 

Mes Mains Sur Tes Hanches (Korn) Adamo (Odeon) 

Bang Bang Sheila (Philips); Eddie Barclay, Dalida (Disc Jockey) 
"Siempre Te Recordare (Korn) Yaco Monti (Odeon Pops) 

Sin Fe (Korn) Jose Feliciano (RCA) 

Olvida (Esqueca) Roberto Carlos (CBS) 

La Banda Borracha (Korn) Los Wawanco (Odeon Pops); Tito Al- 
berti (Music Hall); Niko Estrada (Disc Jockey); Henry Nelson 
(CBS) 

Sunny Bobby Hebb (Philips) 

El Conductor (Korn) Wawanco (Odeon Pops); Caucanos (Music 
Hall); Cinco del Ritmo (Microfon); Henry Nelson (CBS) 

Amor Desesperado (Korn) Yaco Monti (Odeon Pops) 

Loi^al 


15 

7 
9 

8 

12 


11 

13 

10 

19 

16 


17 


14 


Gci^ Box* 


AUSTRALIA 


At this stage we say goodbye to 1966 and look forward with great antici- 
pation to 1967. And at the same time, we send Happy New Year e‘reetinp’<? 
from AUSTRALIA to our friends allover the worlfin aH sphere? of the 
industry. 


1966 wasn’t the most exciting year in the business, but it was no where near 
the worst year either. As a matter of fact, the year closed with biggest rush 
on record manufacturing that we can remember. ALL plants were working to 
full capacity, and, where possible, work was being farmed-out to other com- 
panies. And still the demand couldn't be met. 

In relation to our best-seller list of the year which appeared in last weeks 
issue; we feel a few words of explanation are in order regarding the locally- 
produced product. 


There would probably have been more local discs shown had they hit 
NATI()NALLY when first released. In many instances, a local record will get 
going' in its state of origin and do well; then it will progressively move from 
State to State thereby NOT SHOWING OUT NATIONALLY and simultane- 
ously in all States, but eventually becoming a National success on a strictly 
regional basis. 

Had such records become popular all over Australia at the same time they 
would have shown much more strongly on our list because we run a National 
chart. 


On behalf of the various companies they handle and represent in this terri- 
tory, Leeds Music are out with a big batch of sheet copies that are keeping 
the cash registers jumping: “See See Rider” and “Let It Be Me” (Leeds); 
“With A Girl Like You” and “Stop, Stop, Stop” (Dick James Music); “Cara- 
Lyn” and “Last Train to Clarksville” (Tu-Con Music); “I Can’t Control My- 
self,” “Yellow Submarine,” and “Eleanor Rigby” (Northern Songs). On behalf 
of Accolade Music, Leeds are distributing the sheet copy of “Bend It,” the 
big one for Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich. 

EMI are doing top business with the Stones’ album, “Big Hits . . . High Tide 
and Green Grass.” It is being marketed in imported covers which contain a 
whole flock of color pictures of the Rolling Stones. 

Among the current singles for RCA in Australia are two by Elvis Presley, 
“Spinout” c/w “All That I Am” and “If Every Day Was Like Christmas” c/w 
“How Would You Like To Be.” Local artist Phil Lanham is represented with 
“When I Dance With You” and “Remember Me.” The Youngbloods have 
“Grizzly Bear” and “Tears Are Falling.” The new one for Marilyn Maye brings 
“Cabaret” and “Two Lovers”; the Mamas and Papas have “Dancing In The 
Street” c/w “Words Of Love”; while Henry Mancini is heard with “Hawaii” 
and “Driftwood And Dreams,” both from the film “Hawaii” which is now 
showing in this country. 

Astor recording artists the Dargies, who have been featured on several new 
albums released this year, are heard on a new package entitled “The Dargies 
On Stage.” As the title indicates, it carries a great deal of the repertoire that 
the unit uses in its stage act. 

We recently attended a very swingin’ little Christmas party function hosted 
by music publisher Jack Argent on behalf of the various publishing companies 
within the Leeds Music group. Jack, of course, is tickled pink with the national 
success of the Johnny Young records of “Cara-Lyn” and “Let It Be Me.” 

As we wrap-up our final column for 1966, we do so with the sincere hope 
that 1967 will be the year when an Australian-produced record will become 
an international success. It is great to see some enterprising overseas record 
companies releasing Australian product, especially American companies. 


Australia's Best Sellers 

1 Ooh La La (Normie Rowe — Sunshine) Southern Music. 

2 ’’Let It Be Me (E.P.) (Johnny Young — Clarion) Various publishers. 

3 Friday On My Mind (The Easybeats — Parlophone) J. Albert & Son. 

4 No Milk Today (Herman’s Hermits — Columbia) Reg Connelly Music. 

5 Good Vibrations (The Beach Boys — Capitol) J. Albert & Son. 

6 ’'’Spicks And Specks (The Bee Gees — Spin) Belinda Music. 

7. ’'’The Loved Ones (E.P.) (The Loved Ones — W & G) Woomera Music. 

8 I’m A Boy (The Who — Philips) 

9 Winchester Cathedral (New Vaudeville Band — Philips) Southern Music. 
10 Bend It (Dave Dee, Dozy, etc., — Philips) Accolade Music. 

10 Somewhere My Love (Ray Conniff Singers — CBS) J. Albert & Son. 
Asterisk indicates locally produced record. 


ARGENTINA (Continued) 

overwhelming majority in the new Cuarteto Imperial LP (CBS): ten out of 
twelve titles. Spanish title “Vuelo 502” has two new versions: Santy Castel- 
lanos on Neptuno and Rosarito La Andaluza on RCA. 

Disc Jockey reports good results on its recent outings by Eddie Barclay 
(“Un Homme Et Une Femme”) which competed successfully with the sound- 
track album from the film. The diskery is releasing a new single by Charles 
Aznavour and is also happy with the sales of Rosamel Araya’s new LP, cut 
with Los Antonios. 








BARCLAY’S BIG BASH— Barclay In- 
ternational’s annual ball was held in 
Paris Dec. 3rd, with “London” as a 
theme. Among the 1500 invited guests 
were: (top row, left to right) Mme. 
Eddie Barclay, the Duke of Bedford, 
Jean Sablon, Henri Varna, Mme. 
Volterra, Mme. Line Renaud, M. & 
Mme. Tino Rossi & son, Mme. Darry 
Cowl, Eddie Barclay (prexy of Bar- 
clay Records), Mme. Eddie Barclay, 
the Duke of Bedford; (bottom row) 
Mile. Tania Constantine, Eddie Bar- 
clay, Mme. Eddie Constantine, Eddie 
Constantine, Pierre Delanoe, Mme. 
Pierre Delanoe, Eddie Barclay, Mme. 
Zizi Jeanmaire, the Duke of Bedford, 
and Mme. Martine Carol. 



1 


I 





6 

u 


i 


43 


IL 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966- 


InternaHonal Section 


<;^france]^ 

With the end of musicians strike (see international news report page), the 
most important events of the week are the results of the Grand Prix de 
I’Academie du Disque 1966. 

George Chelon and .Jeanne Moreau are the big winners in variety. Chelon 
(Pathe Marconi) is a young author and composer. He received the prize for 
his second LP with “Morte Saison” and Prelude.” Jeanne Moreau — well known 
as a movie star (“Viva Maria”) — got the prize for a new LP album via the 
Canetti label (Polydor distributing). This is the complete palmares of the 
Academie du Disque Frangais. 

Prix Du President De La Republique 

French contempory Music: Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum (Mes- 
siaen). Group instrumental a percussion de Strasbourg, Orchestre du Domaine 
musical, conducted by Pierre Boulez. 

Prix De La Ville De Paris 

World greatest realization: Ex-Aequo: La Walkyrie (Wagner). Birgitt Nils- 
son, Hans Hotter, Regine Crespin, Orchestra philai’morique de Vienne, con- 
ducted by George Solti. Tristan Et Isolde (Wagner). Birgitt Nilsson, Wolfgang 
Windgassen, Christa Ludwig, Choeurs and Orchestra of Festival de Bayreuth, 
conducted by Karl Boehm. 

Prix Colette 

Poetry: Rimbaud by Laurent Terzieff and Roger Blin. Essay: Saint-Exupery 
by Michel Bouquet, Jacques Dacquine, Jean Deschamps. (Hachette I’Encyclo- 
pedie sonore). 

Prix Arthur Honegger 

La Fete De Saint Michel (Decca). Messe de L’Arbresle (Michel Puig) (S.M.). 
Les Sept Paroles Du Christ Sur La Croix (Haydn) (Discotheque des dix Mille). 
Mighty High by Milt Buckner (Barclay). 

Prix Charles Cros 

Classical Music: Ex-Aequo: Les Senates Pour Piano (Beethoven) by Wilhelm 
Kempff (D.G.G.). L’Age D’or De La Musique Anglaise. The Deller Consort 
with Alfred Deller (Guilde international du disque). Varieties: Les Grands 
succes De Grorges Brassens (Tape Cartridge) (Musicassette Philips). 

Prix Jacques Rouche 

Operetta: Bataclan (Offenbach). Boulangeot, Amade and Corazza, Terrasson, 
Desailly, Chorale philarmonique Caillard, Orchestra of Jean-Frangois Paillard 
conducted by Marcel Couraud (Erato). Melodies: Le Bestiaire, Chansons Vil- 
lageoises, Rapsodie Negre, Le Bal Masque, (Poulenc). Jean-Christophe Benoit, 
Solistes and Orchestre de la Societe des Concerts du Conservatoire, Maryse 
Charpentier, conducted by George Pretre (V.S.M.). Vocal group; En Retrou- 
vant Le Moyen-Age (B.A.M.). Ballet: Eloge De La Folie (Constant) (Erato). 

Prix Des Arts Et Lettres 

Classical Music: Missa Solemnis (Beethoven). New Philarmonia Orchestra 
and Choeurs conducted by Otto Klemperer (V.S.M.). Contemporary Music: 


FRANCE (Continued) 

Concerto Pour Violon Et Orchestre (Serge Nigg). Christian Ferras et TOr^es- 
tre Philarmonique de TORTF, condutced by Charles Bruck. 24 Preludes Pour 
Orcheste (Constant). Orchestre Philarmonique de TORTF conducted by Charles 
Bruck (D.G.G.). Theatre: Letartuffe by Fernand Ledoux (Moliere) (Ades). 
Testimony: Max-Pol Fouchet raconte . . . (Barclay). 

Prix Des Universites De France 

Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme by Louis Seigner (Moliere-Lulli) (Guilde Inter- 
nationale du disque).. Images De Bertold Brecht by Serge Reggiani and 
Catherine Sauvage (D.G.G.). L’Enseignement Au XXeme Siecle by Gaston 
Bonheur (Riviera). 

Prix Du Conservatoire 

L’Art De La Fuque (Bach) (Club Frangais du disque). Marcel Bitsch and 
Claude Pascal. Equivalences (Eloy), Madrigal III (Pousseur), La Nuit Trans- 
figuree (Schoenberg) (Ades). Trois Concertos Pour Flute Et Oi'chestre (De- 
vienne, Clretry, Gluck) (Columbia). Sonates (Prokofiev, Debussy, Isaye, Ravel). 
David Oistrakh and Frida Bauer (C.D.M.). Pieces Pour Piano A Quatre Mains 
(Debussy). Alfons and Aloys Kontarsky. (Harmonia Mundi Studio Neuer Mu- 
sik). Louis Couperin, Champion De Chambonnieres, by Antoine (leofTroy- 
Dechaume, Clavecin (Columbia). Oeuvres Pour Orgues (Integrale) (Nicolas de 
Grigny). Marie-Claire Alain aux grandes orgues de Sarlat (Erato). 

Prix De LTnstitut De Musicologie 

Chants Berberes De Kabylie (B.A.M.). 

Prix Des Phonotheques 

Ancient Music: Anthologie De La Musique Portugaise XVIIeme etXVIIIeme 
Siecles (Philips). Folk Music: Chansons Du Pays De France n°2. Serge Kerval 
(B.A.M.). Folk songs: Flamenco. Manitas de Plata (Philips). 

Prix Francis Carco 

Humour: 12 Chansons A La (Pour Les) Coq(s) (Ades). Omajakeno Poems, 
songs of Raymond Queneau (C.D.M.). Children: Ex-Aequo: Titane Et Bou- 
grenette by j. P. Chabrol (Barclay). Babar, Le Petit Elephant (J. de Brunoff, 
F. Poulenc). L’Histoire Du Petit Tailleur (Grimm, Tibor Harsanyi) by Peter 
Ustinov (V.S.M.). Dance Music: Ragtime Claude Bolling; (Philips). Foreign 
singer: Chansons Catalanes. “Raimon a TOlympia” (C.B.S.). Chanson 1966. 
Georges Chelon (Pathe). Jeanne Moreau (Canetti). 


French EP TOP TEN 

1 Les Playboys (Jacques Dutronc) Vogue; Alfa 

2 L’Heure de La Sortie (Sheila) Philips; Carrere-Breton 

3 Noir C’est Noir (Johnny Hallyday) Philips; Barclay 

4 J’Ai Peur (Enrico Macias) Pathe; Cirta 

5 La Chanson de Lara (John William) Polydor; France Melodie 

6 En Bandouliere (Adamo) Voix de son maitre; Pathe Marconi 

7 La Chanson de I^ara (Les compagnons de la Chanson) CBS; France 
Melodie 

8 Paris Brule t’il (Mireille Mathieu) Barclay 

9 L’incendie a Rio (Sacha Distel) EMI; Prosadis 
10 Celine (Hugues Auffray) Barclay 



7 

r 

I 

V 

] 

I 

I 


] 

f 

*, 

( 



PALAIS DES FESTIVALS 
CANNES — FRANCE 


MEET AT THE MIDEM 

1st 

INTERNATIONAL RECORD AND 
MUSIC PUBLISHING MARKET 

You MUST be present at the AAIDEAA 

You will meet there 

FROM 30 COUNTRIES 


From Monday January 30 
to Saturday February 4, 
1967 


• 300 companies 

• 1,000 professionals: 


FOR 1967 SAVE RUNNING AROUND THE WORLD 

DO ALL YOUR BUSINESS IN 6 DAYS 
IN SUNNY CANNES 


• Executives and A & R managers 
of Records companies 

• Music publishers 

• Show-business organizers 

• Artists 

• Agents 

• Representatives of the trade and 
information press 

• Heads of light entertainment radio 
programmes 

• Producers of light entertainment 
TV programmes 


Request for documentation and all correspondence are to be addressed to: 

MIDEM, General Management, 9 Rue Magellan, 75 PARIS 8°— FRANCE. Telephone: 359.35.35— Cable: MIDEM-PARIS 042 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966- 


International Section 


49 




is Johnny Jordaan coming back? The still renowned Amsterdam folk singer, 
discovered by and reaching the big time through Bovema’s HMV label in the 
mid-50’s, made a highly-successful surprise appearance in Corrie Brokken’s 
TV show. Jordaan, reassured and convincing as never before, is getting a lot 
of attention in the Dutch music press nowadays. Bovenia’s A&R man John 
Moring commented “We’re busy recording Jordaan and expect to have a new 
album with an entirely new repertoire out in the course of this month.” 

Bovema’s His Master’s Voice label last week released two new albums now 
on its Angel December catalog: Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas” under Sir John 
Barbirolli and Mozart's “Don Giovanni” under the baton of Otto Klemperer. 
On Dec. 10th HMV’s top comedian Toon Hermans was appointed honorary 
member of the Royal Dutch Federation of Harmony and Brassbands, which 
saw its annual congi-ess in Utrecht highlighted by Toon personally conducting 
one of his own march tunes. Reel Kruyze, Bovema label manager (singles), 
reports that the Beach Boys’ latest hit, “Good Vibrations,” is still selling 
extremely well in this country. Both the gi’oup and the record were featured 
in a film report on Vara’s Fan Club TV series. 

CBS’ John Williams, the 25-year old world-famous guitarist, gave two out- 
standingly successful recitals in Amsterdam and The Hague. Guitar music 
lovers were carried away by his performance and cheered John Williams to 
the roof, 'fhe long-awaited 2-record set of Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 with 
Leonard Bernstein conducting the London Symphony Orchestra and various 
soloists (Erna Spoorenberg, Gwyneth Jones, a.o.) has been released by CBS 
this week. This handsomely-packed set is certain to attract attention. Mr. 
Hans Citroen, artistic director of the Hague Residency Orchestra, will com- 
mence a series for local radio station entitled “A Profile Of Bruno Walter.” 
The entire Bruno Walter catalog being released on CBS consists of 43 albums. 

One of the hottest CBS albums at the moment is “Somewhere My Love” by 
Ray Conniff and the Singers. Immediately after its initial release, it became 
one of the fastest-selling LP’s in Holland. In the very near future CBS is 
going to release a new album by the Kilima Hawaiians, famous local group, 
entitled “Moonlight Over Hawaii.” Their first CBS album, entitled “Farewell 
Hawaii” is still a bestseller in many countries. 

Warner Bros. /Reprise surprised Robert Oeges and Hans E. Kellerman, 
managing directors of Negram/ Delta with two new LP’s of Dean Martin: 
“Dean Martin Christmas Album” and Dino’s “TV Show,” doing very well 
because of his very successful show on the Dutch A.V.R.O.-T.V. Sammy Davis 
may hit again with his new LP “Sammy Davis Sings.” Three new singles are 
sure to reach the charts: Dean Martin’s “Let The Good Times In”; Peter Paul 
and Mary’s “For Baby” and a rush release of the new much-promising Ameri- 
can group Electric Prunes “I Had Too Much To Dream.” Dutch group the 
Motions appeared at the Olympia in Paris last week. 

Holland's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 


2 


3 


4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


Last 

Week 

3 Friday On My Mind (Easybeats/U.A.) (U.A. Music-Altona 
Amsterdam) 

•5 Green Green Grass Of Home (Tom Jones/Decca) (Altona, 
Amsterdam) 

1 No Milk Today (Herman’s Hermits/Columbia) (Connelly-Basart 
N.V. / Amsterdam ) 

2 Sammy (Ramses Shaffy Philips) ( Basart/ Amsterdam ) 

7 Gimme Some Lovin’ (Spencer Davis Group/Fontana) ( Essex- 
Basart Amsterdam) 

— Dead End .Street (Kinks/Pye) (Belinda/Amsterdam ) 

4 Stop Stop .Stop ( Hollies /Parlophone) 

6 Little Man (Sonny & Cher/ Atlantic) (Belinda/ Amsterdam) 

9 Distant Drums (Jim Reeves'RCA) (Internationale Muziek Co./ 
Amsterdam) 

— Touch (Outsiders/Relax) ( Intertone-Basart/ Amsterdam) 



Great Britain's Best Seilers 

This 

Last 

Weeks 

Week 

Week 

On Chart 

1 

1 

6 

Green Green Grass — Tom Jones (Decca) Burlington 

2 

2 

6 

*What Would I Be — Val Doonican (Decca) Marvel 

3 

5 

3 

Morningtown Ride — The Seekers (Columbia) Compass 

4 

15 

2 

Sunshine Superman — Donovan (Pye) Southern 

5 

6 

4 

What Becomes of The Brokenhearted — Jimmy Ruffin (Tam- 
la Motown) Belinda 

6 

11 

3 

You Keep Me Hanging On — The Supremes (Tamla Mo- 
town) Carlin 

7 

3 

8 

Good Vibrations — The Beach Boys (Capitol) Immediate 

8 

7 

4 

*Dead End Street — The Kinks (Pye) Davray 

9 

4 

5 

*My Mind’s Eye — The Small Faces (Decca) Robbins 

10 

10 

4 

Friday On My Mind — The Easybeats — (United Artists) 
United Artists 

11 

8 

8 

*Gimme Some Lovin’ — Spencer Davis (Fontana) Island 

12 

19 

2 

*Save Me — Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich (Fontana) 




Lynn 

13 

16 

2 

If Every Day Was Like Xmas — Elvis Presley (RCA) Cri- 
terion 

14 

9 

5 

Just One Smile — Gene Pitney (Stateside) A. Schroeder 

15 

13 

8 

*Semi Detached Suburban Mr. James — Manfred Mann (Fon- 
tana) Carter Lewis 
-Local copyrights 

Top Ten LP's 


1 The Sound of Music — Soundtrack 
(RCA) 

2 Come The Day — The Seekers 
( Columbia ) 

3 Best of The Beachboys — The 
Beachboys (Capitol) 

(^ntle Shades of Val Doonican — 
;Decca) 

5 Distant Drums — Jim Reeves 
■RCA) 


6 Golden Hits — Dusty Springfield 
(Philips) 

7 Revolver — The Beatles (Parlo- 
phone) 

8 Big Hits — The Rolling Stones 
(Decca) 

9 Collection of Beatles Oldies — The 
Beatles (Parlophone) 

10 Hand Clapping Foot Stamping 
Geno Washington — Geno Wash- 
ington (Piccadilly) 



News from Companhia Brasileira De Discos (Philips) is that the popular 
and talented vocal group Os Cariocas (who were so successful in the States) 
is leaving on a Mexico tour for TV and personal appearances. Their latest al- 
bum for the Polydor label contains such current hits as “A Banda” and “Lunik 
9” and is enjoying good sales. Composer Caetano Velloso and chantress Gal 
Costa have been pacted by the company and will soon appear together in an 
album called “Apresentando Caetano e Gal.” Velloso penned winning numbers 
“Boa Palavra” and “Um Dia.” ... A new label will be launched by CBD next 
January — Fontana — first disc will be “Sucessos,” with Nicholas & Seu Con- 
junto. 

Two more singles recently released by new label “Au” are heading for good 
positions in the local charts: “Flor Maior” by the. Pequenos Cantores De Sao 
Paulo and “La Vem O Bloco” by Leny Eversong. Both albums released with 
the Sao Paulo Festival of the instrumental group Os Versateis are still head- 
ing for No. 1 spots. 

From Fermata we hear that: Oslain Galvao, who is doing very well with his 
single for RGE (“Tereza”), is preparing repertoire for his new album all from 
the Fermata pubbery. Dee jay Ferreira Martins (Radio Piratininga) is being- 
approached by several diskeries — as a result of his great popularity — to cut a 
disc as a singer with material repertoire also from the Fermata pubbery. 

After a successful Latin American tour, teen-canter Sergio Murilo retuims 
to his disc activity at RCA with a carefully-prepared album of compositions 
by the new generation and four versions of international hits. Popular chanter 
Carlos Gonzaga (over two million discs sold) appears again with a teen-music 
single. Late Italian tenor Mario Lanza is remembered by RCA in a specially- 
mounted album for Brazilian RCA. 

CBS Do Brasil comes next with a few quickies: an album by new “sambista” 
Ary Vilela is already making noise saleswise. Paulo Bob will be present in 
the next Carnival with some of his recordings. Busy teen-group Renato & Seus 
Blue Caps have a new album ready for release; the group’s discs are being re- 
quested from as far off as Australia. The recently-released album by teen idol 
Roberta Carlos is selling in a way that indicates it will be on the charts soon. 
So will the singles, mostly “Namoradinha De Um Amigo Meu” and “Eu Te 
Darei O Ceu” which promise to be absolute best-sellers. 

Based on the big success of Deny & Dino’s number “Coruja” — which reached 
first spot on the local charts — Odeon released an album from the vocal two- 
some with that name. Mexican “bolero” rhythms — very popular here— appear 
in a serial album by Irany & Seu Conjunto, entitled “Boleros Em Surdina No. 
10.” The agreement with British London label is assuring a constant export 
of successful Odeon discs all over the world, in albums cut for that purpose. 

Brazil's Best Sellers 


i This 
I Week 
! 1 

I 

2 


3 

1 




8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

11 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 

22 

23 

24 

25 


1 


6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 


1 

2 

3 


.5 

6 


Last 

Week 

2 *Disparada (Ed. Porta-Estandarte) Jair Rodrigues/Philips (CBD); 

Ely Camargo (Chantecler) ; Geraldo Vandre/RCA Victor 
1 *A Banda (Fermata) Chico Buarque/RGE; Nara Leao/Philips; 
Pequenos Cantores de Sao Paulo/AU; Altamiro Carrilho/Copaca- 
bana 

3 Lara’s Theme (Todamerica) A1 Korvin/Fermata; The Jordans/ 
Copacabana 

7 The More I See You (Todamerica) Chris Montez/A&M (Fer- 
mata ) 

1 Monday, Monday (Vitale) Mama’s & Papa’s/Dunhill (RCA) 

6 Esqueca/Forget Him (Vitale) Robert Carlos/CBS; Gary Lewis ^ 
RCA Victor 

5 Meu Bem/Girl (Fermata) Ronnie Von/Polydor (CBD) 

10 *Ebrio De Amor (Edicoes RCA) Lindomar Castilho/Continental 

2 *A Carta (Fermata) Erasmo Carlos/RGE 

11 *Tijolinho (Vitale) Bobby de Carlo/Mocambo (FDR) 

8 Pare O Casamento (Aberbach) Wanderlea/CBS 

14 *Agora t, Tarde (Fermata) Marcos Roberto/Continental 

13 Yellow Submarine/Subarino Amarelo (Fermata) The Beatles/ 
Odeon; Os Vips/Continental 

9 Strangers In The Night (Fermata) Frank Sinatra/Reprise (CBD) 
13 California Dreamin’ (Vitale) Mama’s & Papa’s/Dunhill (RCA) 

16 *0 Adeus (Fermata) Ary Sanches/Continental 

19 *Nao Va Embora (Fermata) Barros de Alencar/Chantecler 
18 Morrer Ou Viver (Vitale) Wanderley Cardoso/Copacabana 
24 Nao Te Perdoarei (n.p.) Morgan/Continental 

17 *A Partida (Edigoes RCA) Os Iguais/RCA Victor 

21 Eu Te Darei Bern Mais/Io Ti Daro Di Piu (Fermata) Moacyr 
Franco/Copacabana 

20 Merci Cherie (Edigoes RCA) Udo Jurgens/Vogue-Mocambo 
(FDR); Matt Monro/Capitol (Odeon) 

— *Pedestre (n.p.) Nerino Silva/Continental 

15 *Vem Chegando A Madrugada (Nossa Terra) Jair Rodrigues/ 

Philips (CBD) 

23 Pobre Menina/Hang On Sloopy (Mellin) Leno & Lilian^CBS; Jan 
& Dean/RCA 

*Original Brazilian Copyright 

Brazirs TOP TWELVE LP^S 

1 Revolver — The Beatles/Odeon 

4 Dr. Zhivago — Original Soundtrack/MGM (CBD) 

2 O Sorriso De Jair — Jair Rodrigues/Philips (CBD) 

3 A Banda — Chico Buarque de Hollanda/RGE 

7 Viva O Festival — Several Brazilian Artists/Au (FDR i 

6 As 14 Mais, Vol. 18 — Several Brazilian Artists/CBS 
9 Chapeuzinho Vermelho — Jet Blacks/Chantecler 

5 Meu Bern — Ronnie Von/Polydor (CBD) 

— Cass, John, Michelle, Dennis — Mama’s & Papa’s/Dunhill (RCA) 

— Studio 17 — Os Jordans /Copacabana 

— Uma Noite No Urso Branco — Os Versateis/Au (FDR) 

— Animalisms — The Animals/Odeon 

Top Six Double Compacts 

2 Dr. Zhivago — Frank Pourcel/Odeon 

1 California Dreamin’ — Mama’s & Papa’s/Dunhill (RCA) 

3 Love Me, Please Love Me — Michel PolnarefF/Disques Az (Fer- 
mata-Mocambo ) 

4 Pare O Casmento — Wanderlea/CBS 

4 El Presidente — Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass/ A&M (Fermata) 

— Canta, Mas Nao Mente — Guto & Moacyr Franco/Copacabana 


50 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966' 


International Section 




DENMARK 

As to sales the weeks before Christmas, most trade people here in Denmark 
appear very satisfied. No one has the feeling that they were poor, as answers 
ranged from “Normal” to “extra-ordinary.” 

Dansk Grammofonpladeforlag is out with the first LP album done by local 
group Defenders, titled “Looking At You.” Among other local releases is a 
new single with Caesar, an EP with Doul Dissing, and a number of imported 
LP’s, EP’s and singles on Kenwood, Supraphon, Musidisc, Epic, Roulette and 
Septima labels. 

Latest releases from Mprks Musikforlag includes “Dead End Street” with 
the Kinks on Pye and “The Shadow Knows” with Charlatans on Kapp. 

HNF (Hede Nielsens Fabriker A/S) rushed out a new Elvis Presley LP 
including the songs from the flipper “California Holiday.” 


} 

I 




FINLAND 

Coming on very strong are “No Milk Today” with Herman’s Hermits on 
Columbia and “Stop! Stop! Stop!” with the Hollies on Parlophone, both de- 
buting on the charts here this month. 

Latest local releases from Scandia-Musiikki Oy include two new singles at 
Sonet. Heikki Aarva is doing “Bukarest” and “Kun Kohtaat Ystavan.” Piro 
Soujanen has done “Ikkunassa Illalla” and “Syntymapaivavalssi.” On Metro- 
nome Siw Malmkvist has done “1 Couldn’t Live Without Your Love” b/w a 
Swedish tune in Finnish. 

NORWAY 

Newcomer on the charts here this week is the Kinks on Pye with “Dead 
End Street.” 

Latest releases from A/S Nera include “Why Not Stop And Dig It While 
You Can” with Barry McGuire, “Look Through My Window” with Mama’s & 
Papa’s, and “Forget Domani” with Pero Como. 

Latest releases from Arne Bendiksen A/S include Ase Thoresen on Triola 
with “En Gang, Et Sted” (being “Somewhere, My Love” in Norwegian), 
Vanguards — top selling group here — has done “Min Barndoms By” (Green, 
Green Grass Of Home), and Kirsti Sparboe doing “Edelweiss” and “Have 
You Ever Been Lonely ’ in Noiwegian accompanied by Arne Bendiksen on the 
mouth-organ. 


I Norsk Phonogram A/S (NPA) is strongly promoting Beatmakers, a quintet 
^ from Oslo currently coming on strong with “I Remember When 1 Loved Her” 
I on Philips. 

'I SWEDEN 

B Second Swedish artist to appear on the CBS label will be Jan Malmsjd, 
who just signed a contract with AB Philips-Sonora for the CBS label. First 
local artist at CBS was Lars Lonndahl, who will have two singles and an EP 
on the market in a few weeks. 


Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich will be touring Scandinavia between 
I Dec. 31 and Jan. 7. Manfred Mann is also contracted for Scandinavia about 
the same time. 


Torsten Ehrenmark, popular disc-jockey in Swedish Radio, now has his 
own LP on Dux. On Philips, Gunnel & Jan has done “Brazos River” and “Cot- 
ton Pickin’ Hands” in Swedish. 

Karusell Grammofon AB has started plugging the Australian group Easy 
Beats, now out on United Artists with “Friday On My Mind”/“Made My 
Bed.” 

Cash Box Scandinavian office takes this opportunity to wish all the best for 
1967 to all known and unknown friends throughout the world. 

Denmark's Best Sellers 


This 
W eek 
1 

2 

3 


6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


Last Weeks 
Week On Chart 

1 8 En Tusindfryd 1 Min Hand (En Prastkrage I Min Hand) 

(Keld & Donkeys/HMV) Imudico A/S, Denmark 

2 8 Traed An Ved Makronerne (Hitmakers/Philips) Selection 

of songs — no publisher 

3 16 *Ved Landsbyens Gadekaer (Keld & Donkeys/HMV) Warny 

Music, Denmark 

1 8 Little Man (Sonny & Cher/ Atlantic) Imudico A/S, Den- 

mark 

5 3 *Der Er lys I Lygten (Defenders/Sonet) Wilhelm Han- 

sen, Musik-Forlag, Denmark 

7 I I Can’t Control Myself (Troggs/Fontana ) Multitone A/S, 

Denmark 

6 3 Stop! Stop! Stop! (Hollies/Pailophone) Multitone A/S, 

Denmark 

9 3 Sunny (Cher/Liberty ) Reg Connelly, Musik-Foidag A/S, 

Denmark 

8 3 Marianne (Hooten Singers/Polar) Polar Music AB, Swe- 

den 

10 1.7 Yellow Submarine ( Beatles/Parlophone) Multitone A/S, 

Denmark 

Norway's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

I 

5 

6 
7 


8 

9 

10 


Last Weeks 
Week On Chart 


11 


.7 No Milk Today (Herman’s Hermits/Columbia) Reg Con- 
nelly, Musik-Forlag A/S, Denmark 

1 Good Vibrations (Beach Boys/Capitol) Sweden Music AB, 
Sweden 

6 Edelweiss (Julie Andrews/RCA Victor) Thore Ehrling Mu- 
sik AB, Sweden 

8 I Can’t Control Myself (Troggs/Fontana) Sonora Musik- 
forlags AB, Sweden 

13 Little Man (Sonny & Cher*/ Atlantic ) Edition Odeon, Swe- 
den 

9 Distant Drums (Jim Reeves/RCA Victor) Acuff-Rose 
Scandia, Denmark 

7 I Natt Jag Drbmde (Last Night 1 Had A Strangest 
Dream) (Hep Stars/Olga) Musikforlaget Essex AB, Swe- 
den 

1 Dead End Street (Kinks/Pye) 

6 *Huldresl^tten (Ole Ellesfsaeter/Columbia) No publisher 

•1 Vid Din Sida (Sven Ingvars/Svensk-American) Seven 
Brothers Music Inc./Edition Odeon, Sweden 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966- 


■International Section 


51 





COIN MACHINES & VENDING 


Cash Box Editorial 


Twelfth Root, Rear 


Most editorials written at this season usually begin, 
“As the year draws to a close . . whereas, to be truth- 
ful, they should begin, “As our editorial staff slumps into 
exhausted sleep . . 

Sitting in an office on the Twelth Floor, Rear, before a 
typewriter, a paper cup full of cold coffee nearby waiting 
to be spilled, we recall an anecdote from the typewriter 
of a great journalist. Gene Fowler, concerning a missing 
editorial. 

It was in New York, on a Christmas Eve in the 1920s, 
when the staff of a morning paper repaired to a local tav- 
ern (nowadays it would be called a lounge) after putting 
the paper to bed, ready to relax and carouse into the 
dawn. A copyboy came bursting through the swinging 
doors, rushed up to the managing editor and said breath- 
lessly, “Oh, sir,’’ (copyboys were respectful in those 
days) “there is no editorial!’’ The crashing of a hundred 
dropped drop-glasses punctuated the awful news. 

Unruffled, the managing editor carefully donned his 
Chesterfield coat, set his bowler atop his head and 
walked across the street to the offices of the endangered 
tabloid, followed by a crowd of reporters. Marching in to 
the “city room,’’ he closed the door to his office, took off 
his hat and coat, set himself before his typewriter and, 
after a moment of concentration, attacked the keys with 
gusto. The reporters waited outside, hardly daring to 
breathe, while the copyboy twisted his hat in his fingers. 

After fifteen minutes, the managing editor rose with 
two sheets of paper in his hand and beckoned the copy- 
boy forward. He opened the door, presented the lad with 
the pages, donned his hat and coat and marched back to 
the tavern. As the copyboy dashed by the reporters, one 
of them caught him by the arm and grabbed the pieces 
of paper. The other reporters crowded over his shoulder 
to read the words that would make the morning edition 
a professional and artistic whole. 

They stood agog, for lo, there were not words, but a 
single word, repeated over and over. The word was; 
“Nevertheless.” 

Nevertheless, it has been an eventful year for the coin 
machine trade and so with Twelfth Floor, Rear. There is 
nothing quite like holding the front news page open until 
the last minute on a Thursday night, hoping that the 
mails or the phone will deliver that Important Story, nor 
is there anything quite like jumping into a car and chas- 
ing the printer’s truck to Connecticut, nothing quite like 
cursing and praying over a cantankerous camera to get 
that Important Picture, nor is there anything like the sud- 
den silence of the office after the copy has gone to the 
presses, the last cigarette and cup of coffee before going 
home. 

After a particularly heavy issue it is sometimes neces- 
sary and refreshing to stand on the balcony and watch 
the traffic going by on Broadway and, the lights glowing. 
From the balcony it is possible to look over to Tenth Ave- 
nue and on some nights, one would swear that Chicago 
and California can be seen, with all the land between. On 
such a night, reporters, editors and other folk relax by 
having a beer and playing the jukebox or game at the lo- 
cal, or the nearest, tavern. We do this not out of a sense 
of duty, but simply because it is fun. 

Tonight, as the holiday and the New year comes, we 
look back on the written and spoken words, the sounds 
and sights of the coin machine industry in 1966; there 
are memories of crises and comedies, things done and 
yet to do. 

They are two particular breeds, journalists and coin 
machine men; both devoted to their professions, simply 
because, once engaged in it, they find they cannot get 
away from it. It may be demanding, possessive and some- 
times frustrating, but it is also goofy, great and grati- 
fying. 

So, from the Twelfth Floor, Rear, we send to the en- 
tire industry holiday greetings, a glass of cheer and four 
choruses of “Auld Lang Syne.” It’s been grand. 


II 

■ 


1 


L. 


52 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


Steiger & Wilson Drop In On Valley 



Ben Gordon (left) presi- 
dent of Valley Distribu- 
tors, poses with supper 
club star Julie Wilson 
and Tel-A-Sign chief A. 
A. Steiger at recent 
Scopitone distributor ap- 
pointee party. Valley 
will handle the audio- 
visual for Connecticut 
and Massachusetts. 


Confusion Remedied 


Complete Details On 

Last week a story appeared in Cash 
Box on the destruction of the J. F. 
Frantz manufacturing offices in Chi- 
cago. Complete details were not avail- 
able at the time and errors in 
the story may have caused confusion, 
which we regret. Below is the original 
copy lately received from the U.S. 
Mails. 

CHICAGO— A 3-11 fire ravaged the 
building housing J. F. Frantz Manu- 
facturing Company, producer of coin- 
operated counter amusement games, 
early Saturday morning, December 10, 
completely devastating equipment and 
fixtures, and causing a temporary de- 
lay in production and shipping. John 
F. Frantz, president and general man- 
ager, sadly I’eported that the destruc- 
tive fire, which started in a nearby 
building, was at first apparently 
brought under control by the fire 
fighters. 


Frantz Factory Fire 

However, undetected smoldering 
embers re-ignited later in the day 
completing the devastation. Three fire- 
men were overcome by smoke inhala- 
tion and otherwise injured by falling 
debris during the struggle to contain 
the blaze. 

In a happier note Frantz, who had 
located his plant in the burned out 
structure at 1940 West Lake Street 
in Windy City since early in 1947, ad- 
vised that he has already acquired a 
suitable building nearby at 2010 West 
Lake Street. His new headquarters 
covers more than 30,000 square feet 
of factory space. 

Frantz and his employees are rush- 
ing to complete an early removal of 
usable equipment. Presently, however, 
all production and shipping on Fra’^tz 
coin-operated counter amusement 
games has been suspended. He will 
shortly announce a resumption of ac- 
tivity in his factory in Cash Box. 


South Carolina Op 
Wins Pool Case In 
State Supreme Court 

COLUMBIA, S. C. — The State Su- 
preme Court of South Carolina has 
found in an operators’ favor in a case 
involving taxation of coin operated 
pool tables. 

Presiding Judge John Grimball re- 
versed the decision of a lower court 
which would have required operator 
U. G. Bryant and Melody Music Co. 
to pay taxes on coin-operated pool 
tables located at a cafe known as 
Chris and Gene’s. 

The Attorney General of the state, 
Daniel McLeod, had coi^tended that 
the placing of the tables in Chris and 
Gene’s made it “a pool hall” under 
the existing state tax laws and was 
therefore subject to taxation under 
Sections 5-50i (6) and 5-513 of the 
1962 Code of Laws. The appellants 
claimed that the primary busi-ess of 
Chris and Gene’s is the servinsr of 
food and drink, that the pool tables 
are simply optional amusement 
games, and that therefore they were 
not required to pay anv extra taxes. 

Section 5-501 (1) defines a billiard 
room or a pocket billiard room as, 
“Any room, hall, huildi»ig or place 
kent for the purpose of oner-ating 
billiard or pocket billiard tables for 
the nurpose of permitting eames to 
be nlaved thereon for profit.” 

Having reversed the decision of the 
lower court on the grounds stated, the 
Court said it was “unnecessary for 
us to consider the constitutional ques- 
tion raised by the anpellants.” Bryant 
had claimed that he was being de- 
prived of his property without due 
process of law. 

The appellant’s case was handled by 
Peter Hyman, a local attorney, who 
has also acted as counsel for the 
South Carolina Coin Operators’ Asso- 
ciation. Complete text of the Court’s 
opinion appears on Pages 54 and 55. 


No A.T.E. Next Year, 
Says Singleton: Will 
Keep To Old Schedule 



J. SINGLBTON 
Secrefory-Genera/ Mgr. 


LONDON — John Singleton, secretary 
& general manager of the Amusement 
Caterers Association, has announced 
that after much consideration it has 
been decided that the Amusement 
Trades Exhibition will, in future, re- 
vert to the old timing of January. 

This means that the next A.T.E. 
will be held at Alexandra Palace from 
16th thru 18th January 1968. There 
will be no A.T.E. next year. 

The recent changeover to Novem- 
ber was experimental and although it 
was thought it would give manufac- 
turers more time to meet the delivery 
date for orders received for the Eas- 
ter holidays (the start of the coin ma- 
chine rush) jt proved otherwise. 

Operators and distributors who at- 
tended the A.T.E. were less willing 
than usual to place orders so far in 
advance of the season — hence the re- 
version to the January date in 1968. 


A Reoort From London 


New Pence Expensive to British Ops 

In an effort to bait the fluctuation of its currency, and to make things simpler 
all round. Great Britain has decided to switch to the Decimal Svstem in grad- 
intr its coinage. This means the disannearance of familiar coins, including those 
used by British coinmen, who will have to retool. They are not happy over the 
prospect and this Report from London tells why. 


Solid State SRO: Runyon 

NEW YORK — A class on Solid State 
and its application in the new AMI 
MMl Music Merchant Phonograph 
was conducted by Art Seglin (Rowe’s 
field service engineer in the Eastern 
Region) on Wednesday, Dec. 14th at 
the New York office of the Runyon 
Sales Co. 

Those who attended included: Loy 
Wolberg, Joel Hochberg, Sid Gerber, 
Daniel Cioffi, James Gough, Ruben 
Figuero, Bruch Haber and Joe Tilotta 
from Runyon; operators and their 
service personnel present included: 
Hector Colon, Sam Kramer, Leo 
Rosenberg, Neal Rosenberg, Max 
Krull, Moe Stein, Karl Williams, Sam 
Lerner, Phil Kaplan, Ralph Schneider, 
Carmine Abbatiello, Irving Meltzer, 
Roger GetzofF, Fred Collav, Jr. and 
Fred Collay, Sr., Buddy Dickerman, 
Henry Schwartz, Bernard Stecker, 
Harry Zall, Murray Wollman, Sv Ha- 
ber, Mike Saperstein, Raymond Digio- 
vine, Harold Monroe, John Trapani, 
Bernard Blum, Robert Weisbart, Phil- 
lip Schwartz, William Goetz, Herb 
Cook and Jerome Levine. 


MOA's Final Score: 31 1 

CHICAGO — MOA managing director 
Fred Granger announced last week 
that the final tally in the MOA mem- 
bership drive, which began January 1 
and closed the night of October 30th, 
is three hundred eleven — sixty-one 
over the original quota of two hun- 
dred and fifty. 

“This is one of our finest achieve- 
ments,” said Granger, “and it dem- 
onstrates the capacity of MOA to per- 
form; it shows our ability to grow 
and by growing extend the benefits of 
MOA membership to more and more 
operators. Outstanding jobs were done 
by committee chairmen, co-chairmen 
and individual workers, but the total 
performance is, I think, one of the 
most thrilling events ever to take 
place in the industry.” 

Meanwhile, president James Toli- 
sano and board chairman John Wal- 
lace said that the next board meeting 
will take place in Washington D.C., 
probably in March. Other cities were 
considered as meeting sites, thev said, 
but the copyright problem finally de- 
termined the selection of Washington. 


LONDON — The system to be adopted 
when Britain swit<^hes to decimal 
coinage in 1971 has now been outlined 
in a Government White Paper. It is 
based on the £1 being the major unit 
of currency divided into 100 ‘new 
pennies’. 

Despite pressure from many ouar- 
ters to make 10/- the basic unit di- 
vided into cents the Government 
White Paper states that the practical 
advantages of retaining the .fil ar’e 
decisive and are not based primarily 
on the fact that the £1 is an interna- 
tional currency. There will be six new 
denominations in the new coinage as 
follows: 


Denominations 

Value 

Metal 

Half New Penny 

1.2d 

Bronze 

One New Penny 

2.4d 

Bronze 

Two New Pence 

4.8d 

Bronze 

Five New Pence 

1/- 

Cunro-Nickel 

Ten New Pence 

2/- 

Cunro-Nickel 

Fifty New Pence 

10/- 

Metal to be 
announced 


The ‘Fifty New Pence’ coin will 
eventually renlact the 10/- note. The 
present £1, £5 and £10 notes will stay 
in use but the half-crown, sixpence, 
three-penny piece, the nresent nen- 
nies and half-pennies will go. There 
will be a transitional period from 
February 1971 of up to two years 
during which both the new and old 
currencies will be available side by 
side. The switch will mean the mint- 
ing of nearly 9,000 million decimal 
coins. 

It will also mean the conversion of 
between two and three million busi- 
ness machines and about the same 
number of slot machines including 
telephone coin boxes, gas and elec- 
tricity meters etc. 

Members of the coin machine in- 
dustry view the Government’s pro- 


posals for decimal coinage with con- 
siderable regret. Along with a num- 
ber of other business organizations 
the A.T.A. plan to oppose whole- 
heartedly the adoption of the £1 
rather that the 10/- system. The main 
reasons being firstly that the new 
half-penny which is really the equiv- 
alent of the present nenny is to be 
ridiculously small. Although new ma- 
chines can be constructed to take any 
size coin the conversion of old ma- 
chines will be very difficult indeed. 
If the 10/- method had been adopted 
the bigger size penny would be in op- 
eration. 

Secondly, the adoption of the £I 
system means the disappearance of 
the sixpenny piece now much used in 
the coin machine and vending indus- 
tries and manufacturers will have to 
bear this conversion in mind when 
producing new machines. The 10/- 
system would have given a 5(j coin 
equivalent to the 6d, thus necessitat- 
ing only two bronze coins of 2(t and 
1^. With the £1 system in operation 
and the 6d deleted three bronze coins 
will be needed. 

In order to avoid having a large 
coin for the highest denomination it 
will be necessary to have a very small 
coin for the lowest denomination. 
Under the 10/- system the new penny 
equivalent would have been the same 
size as the proposed 2.4 new penny 
(the size of the present 6d) which 
would simplify conversion of old ma- 
chines. Other problems involved in- 
clude the question of pay-outs whic’n 
can now be given to the value of 1/- 
in cash-penny machines having odds 
of 12-1. 

It will now be necessary to decide 
whether the odds continue at 12-1 
or will have to be reduced to 10-1 
necessitating a revision of the Gam- 
ing law's. 


Picture Clear, But Names Out of Focus 


Apologies all round. The 
picture at right taken at 
the A.T.E. in London and 
printed in our issue of 
i7th December was in- 
correctly captioned. The 
personalities from left to 
right are: Bill O’Donnell 
(president of Bally Man- 
ufacturing Co.) ; Cyril 
Shack and Michael Green 
(directors of Phono- 
graphic Equipment Dis- 
tributors Ltd.). 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


53 




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The Complete Text of the Supreme 


THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 


In The Supreme Court 


Melody Music Co., Inc., and U. G. Bryant, 
individually and doing business as Chris 

and Gene’s Appellants, 


V. 

Daniel R. McLeod, Attorney General for the 
State of South Carolina, 0. W. Livingston, 

Robert C. Wasson, Sam N. Burts, J. A. Calhoun, 

Jr. and Walter W. Lewis, constituting the 
South Carolina Tax Commission, and Sheppard 
Griffith, Sheriff of Richland County, repre- 
senting law enforcement of the class, Respondents. 


Appeal From Richland County 
John Grimball, Judge 


Opinion No. 18583 
Filed December 5, 1966 

REVERSED AND REMANDED 

Hyman & Morgan, of Florence, for appellants. 

Attorney General Daniel R. McLeod, Assistant Attorney General 
Joseph C. Coleman and Joseph D. Sapp, all of Columbia, for 
respondents. 


MOSS, C.J.: Melody Music Co., Inc. 
distributes and places on location bil- 
liard or pocket billiard tables, meas- 
uring not more than three and one- 
half feet in width and seven feet in 
length, in service stations, grocery 
stores or other places in which the 
principal business is something other 
than the operation of billiard or pock- 
et billiard tables. One of these tables 
is located and operates in a restau- 
rant owned by U. G. Bryant, who op- 
ei'ates a business known as Chris and 
Gene’s. A license for the operation of 
this table was granted by the South 
Carolina Tax Commission pursuant to 
Section 5-665 of the Code. 

Melody Music Co., Inc. and U. G. 
Bryant, trading as aforesaid, the ap- 
pellants herein, instituted this action 
under the “Uniform Declaratory 
Judgments Act”, Sections 10-2001, et 
seq., 1962 Code of Laws, against the 
Attorney General of the State, the 
South Carolina Tax Commission and 
the Law Enforcement Officers of this 
State as a class, the respondents here- 
in, seeking an injunction pendente life 
and permantly from enforcing Sec- 
tions 5-501 (6) and 5-513 of the Code, 
asserting that such statutes have no 
application to billiard or pocket bil- 
liard tables licensed under Section 
5-665 of the Code. The appellants fur- 
ther contend that the enforcement of 
such statutes would deny them the 
equal protection of the law and de- 
prive them of their property without 
due process of law. The answer of the 
respondents allege the applicability of 
the aforesaid statutes to the operation 
of the billiard or pocket billiard table 
either owned or operated by the ap- 
pellants. The unconstitutionality of 
the statutes was also denied. 

This case came on for a hearing be- 
fore the Honorable John Grimball, 
presiding judge, upon an agreed stip- 
ulation of facts. After hearing oral 
arguments and giving consideration to 
written briefs filed by the parties, an 
order was filed in which it was held 
that the injunction pendente lite pre- 
viously issued be dissolved and the 
complaint of the appellants was dis- 
missed. In the order the trial judge 
held as follows: 

“It is my opinion that any room, 
building or place in which are operat- 
ed for profit one or more pool tables, 
whether such tables are of standard 
size or smaller, is a billiard room 
within the meaning of Section 5-501, 
1962 Code, and that such places are 
subject to all requirements of Chapter 
6, Title 5, 1962 Code, except the tax 
rate per table provided in Section 
5-665, 1962 Code, for billiard tables 
measuring not more than three and 
one-half feet by seven feet.” 

The exceptions of the appellants 
raise two questions. (1) Is the opera- 
tion of a billiard or pocket billiard 
table, such as is described in and li- 
censed under Section 5-665 of the 
Code, in places in which the principal 
business is something other than the 
operation of billiard or pocket billiard 
(Confined on page 55) 





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AND HERE’S WHY . . . 

• The home and professional player will now play coin-operated 
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• Magnetic Cue Ball will not become trapped as it separates itself 
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• Regulation size and weight assures player more accuracy. 


for information write or call 


333 MORTON STREET • BAY CITY, MICHIGAN • AREA CODE 517 892-4536 

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54 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 




Court of South Carolina's Pool Table Decision 


(Continued from page 54) 
tables, subject to the provisions of 
Sections 5-501 (6) and 5-513, such 
being statutes contained in Chapter 6 
of the Code; and (2) Does the applica- 
tion of the provisions of Chapter 6, 
as is contained in Sections 5-501, et 
seq. of the Code, to the appellants, 
deny them due process and equal pro- 
tection of the law as guaranteed to 
them by the Fourteenth Amendment 
to the United States Constitution and 
Art. I, Section 5, of the 1895 Con- 
stitution of this State. 

Sections 5-501 through 5-521, Chap- 
ter 6 of the Code, have to do with the 
licensing of and the regulations per- 
taining to the operation of billiard 
rooms or pocket billiard rooms. Sec- 
tion 5-665 of Chapter 7, of the Code, 
has to do with the licensing of any 
billiard or pocket billiard table, as 
such is described in said section. This 
section contains no regulations re- 
garding the operation of any billiard 
or pocket billiard table and in no way 
refers to Chapter 6 of the Code and 
the regulations therein contained. 
However, both Chapter 6 and Chapter 
7 of the Code deal with the licensing 
of billiard or pocket billiard tables. 
Under Section 5-519 of the Code, the 
operator of a billiard room is required 
to pay an annual license tax of Twen- 
ty-five dollars per table and, under 
Section 5-665 of the Code, every per- 
son operating any billiard or pocket 
billiard tables of the description there- 
in contained is required to pay an an- 
nual tax of ten dollars per table. 

The record shows that the appel- 
lants obtained a license to operate a 
pocket billiard table pursuant to the 
provisions of Section 5-665 of the 
Code, which provides: 

“Every person owning or maintain- 
ing any place of business or other 
place wherein or in connection with 
which is operated or located any bil- 
liard or pocket billiard table meas- 
uring not more than three and one- 
half feet wide and seven feet long, 
whether operated by a slot or other- 
wise, shall apply for and procure from 
the Commission a license for the 
privilege of operating such billiard or 
pocket billiard table and shall pay for 
such license a tax of ten dollars for 
each billiard or pocket billiard table 
owned or operated except that every 
person operating billiard or pocket 
billiard tables measuring more than 
three and one-half feet wide and sev- 
en feet long, whether operated by slot 
or otherwise, shall be taxed under the 
provisions of Chapter 6 of this Title.” 

The statutory regulations applica- 
ble to billiard rooms and pocket bil- 
liard rooms are set forth in Section 
5-501, et seq. of the Code. Section 
5-501 (1) defines a “billiard room” and 
“pocket billiard room” as “Any room, 
hall, building or place kept for the 
purpose of operating billiard or pock- 
et billiard tables for the purpose of 
permitting games to be played there- 
on for profit.” 

It is stipulated here that “the pool 
tables involved are operated in serv- 


ice stations, groceries, or general 
stores, or other places in which the 
principal businesses of the establish- 
ments are something other than the 
operation of billiard or pool tables.” 
The principal business of the appel- 
lant Bryant is the operation of a res- 
taurant, and the room in which he 
operates same is not kept for the 
purpose of operating billiard or pock- 
et billiard tables within the contem- 
plation of the provisions set forth in 
Section 5-501, et seq. of the Code. It 
follows that the room in which the 
restaurant was operated is not a bil- 
liard room or pocket billiard room 
and Sections 5-501 (6) and 5-513 are 
inapplicable to the appellants, not be- 
cause the tables are of the dimensions 
mentioned in Section 5-665 but be- 
cause Bryant’s business is other than 
the operation of a billiard room. The 
appellants argue that they are not 
subject to the regulations contained 
in Sections 5-501, et seq.. Chapter 6 
of the Code, because Section 5-665 
operates as a repeal of these sections 
and hence such are not applicable to 
billiard or pocket billiard tables de- 
scribed in Section 5-665, such would 
be a billiard room and subject to the 


restrictive provisions contained in 
Chapter 6 of the Code. 

It is our conclusion that the trial 
judge was in error in holding that 
Bryant’s place of business, because 
of the operation therein of a billiard 
or pocket billiard table, as such is de- 
scribed in Section 5-665 of the Code, 
was a billiard room within the mean- 
ing of Sections 5-501, et seq. of the 
Code, and that such was subject to 
all of the restrictions and regulations 
contained in said sections. 

In view of the foregoing conclusion 
it is unnecessary for us to consider 
the constitutional question raised by 
the appellants. 

The judgment of the lower court 
is reversed and this case remanded 
thereto so that a proper order not 
inconsistent herewith may be entered. 

Reversed and remanded. 

Lewis, Bussey and Brailsford, JJ., 
and Lionel K. Legge, A.A.J., concur. 

(Note — Passages in this text, 
deemed by the editors as having the 
greater significance, have been set in 
bold face type for clarification for 
those readers unfamiliar with the 
style of legal documents.) 


Robert L. Richards 
Elected Chief Of NCA; 

To Take Office Soon 

CHICAGO — Robert L. Richards has 
been elected president of the National 
Confectioners Association, it was an- 
nounced last week by Burr Sifers, the 
association’s board chairman. 

Action on Richards’ election took 
place at the Association’s mid-year 
board meeting, December 7-9. He will 
assume his new duties soon. 

For the past six years, Richards has 
been executive administrator of the 
Illinois State Medical Society. Pre- 
viously, he was executive director, 
American Society of Internal Medi- 
cine, San Francisco, which has 46 
component state societies, and for 12 
years before that Richards was asso- 
ciated with the Pennsylvania Medical 
Society. 

Richards is chairman of the Asso- 
ciation Committee of the U.S. Cham- 
ber of Commerce and has a consider- 
able background in all phases of busi- 
ness and trade association programs 
as well as organizational problems. 

Long active in civic and business 
activities, Richards is a member of the 
executive committee of the Associa- 
tion Executives Forum of Chicago. 
He is a member of the American So- 
ciety of Association Executives, the 
American Management Association 
and Medical Society Executives Asso- 
ciation. 

Richards will make his office at the 
association’s headquarters, 36 South 
Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


55 





TO ALL ADVERTISERS 

BECAUSE OF A PRINTER’S HOLIDAY 
THIS FRIDAY, CASH BOX URGES ALL 
ADVERTISERS TO PLAN ON DELIVERING 
ALL COPY AND PLATES ON OR BEFORE 
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28 TO THE 
CASH BOX NEW YORK OFFICE. FINAL 
DEADLINE IS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 
29, AT 11:30 AM. 



BUY 



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IN 

EVERY TYPE OF LOCATION 
EVERYWHERE 




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Wishing You HAPPY HOLIDAYS ! i 
from ART DADDIS & I 

UNITED BILLIARDS ! 

52-58 Hunter St.. Newark, N.J. (201) 923-9797 1 



THE GRECO BROS 


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BANNER SPECIALTY COMPANY 

ISM FIFTH AVt, FIITSIUIIGH. PA. • llJS-11 N. FIFTH ST„ PHILAMLPHIA. PA. 



THE ANNUAL MOAN N GROAN — Big city as well as country operators 
^e going through the yearend squeeze these days, known by many as the 
Holiday Giveaway Bonanza. The crux of the matter is that little holiday tithe 
donated to location owners, their wives, kids, cats, dogs etc. which most ops 
teel an obligation, for one reason or another, to do. Well, it is good business 
t^o show the location owner your appreciation by putting a little honey in his 
beard once a year After all, guys, it is only once a year. So with tongue in 
check, here are a few last minute gift suggestions for well-intentioned opera- 
tors who like the spots they operate in and feel the same way about the guy 
who owns the location: an adding machine for the location owner and his bar- 
tenders to keep an “accurate” count on the coins they deposited “shilling” the 
machine and the coins the phono “grabbed with returning any music”; a 
custom-made cutolf switch that’ll plunge the place into total blackness each 
time the bartender pulls the plug on the juke to turn on the TV; a year’s sup- 
ply of handkerchiefs and a copy of ‘Hearts And Flowers’ for the poor guy who 
d^pt think his cut of your collections is high enough; and a set of folding 
chairs which the location might break out when the customers start sitting on 
your shuffle alley. 


DO IT AND DO IT RIGHT — MONY’S able attorney Teddy Blatt advised last 
week it s quite possible that many location contracts have been signed but 
been filled out fully, especially the terms of the arbitration clause. 

This contract took us a long time to put together,” Blatt said, “and it’s as 
foolproof as they come. However, we’ve had several instances where an 
operator comes in with an arbitration matter between him and one of his 
locations only to learn he made inadequate provision when the contract was 
originally signed. If you’re going to use a contract, use it right,” the counsellor 
advised. . . . This is the season for giving, as we all know, so please don’t 
forget the Barney Ross Fund. For details, call Lou Wolberg down at Runyon 
Sales. . . . Bronx and Manhattan op Sam Morrison says he’s finished his 
Christmas decorating — decorating the machines with Christmas records, that 
it. The holiday disks rake in their fair share of coins and it’s just a shame the 
season doesn’t come once a month. . . . Rentals on old jukes are always a 
source of extra income during this time with lots of folks looking for some- 
1 thing different to liven up a party. 


I ART’S INTO SOMETHIN’ GOOD — United Billiards prexy Art Daddis is so 
proud of his tables he’s offering an unconditional guarantee on all mechanical 
parts (with the exception of the coin rejector). “I’ve spent a long time in this 
business of table operation,” Daddis said last week, “and I’ve found that 
mechanical simplicity founded on structural durability is the secret to con- 
tinued, trouble-free operation. Therefore, I am able to guarantee the mechanical 
works of these United tables, and, for the life of the machine.” . . . Johnny 
Kirkpatrick, president of a firm called Kirk Electronics Mfg. Co. (located in 
Orlando, Fla.) has pioneered and is now selling a taue cartridge stereo wallbox 
and hideway combination. He calls the unit the ‘Kirk-O-Matic Minute Music 
System and advises that results on test locations after two years have estab- 
lished “almost phenomenal [income] in comparison to ordinary juke boxes in 
similar locations.” The increased collections are due, he says, to the fact that 
the Kirk-O-Matic vends one minute of music per selection as opposed to 
almost three from standard jukes. “We are making arrangements with national 
chain drug stores and restaurants for operator/owned installations on a 
national basis. We are convinced that in securing locations in this manner, 
operators will have no trouble in installing the equipment as fast as the 
arrangements are made by us.” (Johnny, incidentally, is the former owner of 
the Florida Music Company, a juke and games route in central Florida.) 

HERE AND THERE — Picks o’ the week from the lads at Tarantelli Enter- 
I prises (Syracuse one-stop) cite Ray Conniff’s rendition of ‘Mame’ on Columbia 
I and ‘Ev’ry Street’s A Boulevard’ by the great Frankie Laine on ABC 
I Paramount. Tommy’s “Watch This One” for operators is Debbie Meil’s ‘Forever 
; Yours’ on RCA Victor. . . . The lads at Musical Moments operation say two 
I tunes are makin’ hay for big city operators: ‘Hey Leroy, Your Mama’s Calling 
I You’ by Jimmy Castor on Smash and ‘Oh Yeah’ by the Joe Cuba Sextet on Tico 
‘ Records. 


' A WORD TO THE WISE — The Cash Box Classified Section has served as an 
: active and reliable market place for the exchange of used coin equipment and 
phono records for many years. Providing the trade with firm names and lists of 
available equipment either for sale or to buy is its job and it does it well. 
Therefore, we must urge all of our readers to notify us immediately of any 
complaints they might have after doing business with one of our classified 
accounts. One such complaint came in last week and it is obviously not in our 
interest to be a tool for any charlatan business. . . . Harold Kaufman’s recon- 
ditioning Dept, (out at Musical Distributors in Bklyn.) doing first-class work, 
. say some customers we ran into last week. They process one of the largest 
volumes of used machines in the city. Add these to the Wurlitzer and ChiCoin 
lines and it’s easy to understand why it’s so hard to get Harold on the phone. 
. . . Old buddy Nate Sugerman building a solid business in mutual funds and 
securities sales out of his home in Maplewood, N.J. The former Runyon Sales 
comptroller calls his firm Nathan Andrew Associates and numbers many mem- 
bers of this trade among his customers. . . . Wometco Enterprises, one of the 
nation’s largest vending operations, has diversified some of its funds into the 
motion picture business. We can’t wait to see promo director Gerry Whaley on 
the silver screen. . . . Rowe’s own silver screener, the Phono-Vue, due to hit 
heavy on the distributor network round about February, will be sporting many 
of the most colorful new films on the audio-viz scene today. Marketing chief 
Fred Poliak’s been directing some of his attention to this end. . . . Active 
Amusement’s Joe Ash patiently waiting for Gottlieb’s spanking new ‘King Of 
Diamonds’ single-player pin, due in his showrooms by Jan. 10th. Joe’s already 
taken a deck of orders for the new pin and looks forward to biggest year yet 
with the line. New Year’s wishes go out to Philly ops and the rest of the trade 
from the Active prexy, sales execs Marty Brownstein and Frank Ash and parts 
specialist Morris Schein. . . . Tommy Greco’s back from a few days’ stay in 
Birmingham, Ala., visiting with old friend Johnny Rowell. Tom did it the hard 
way — down and back by car. A better man than I! . . . Members of the West- 
chester Operators Guild, their employees and wives enjoyed their annual 
Christmas party at the Tappan Hill Restaurant in Tarry town, N.Y., on Wed. 
Dec. 14th. “Needless to say, a gala evening was enjoyed by all,” says associa- 
tion secretary Seymour Poliak P.S. Best wishes for a prosperous ’67 from 

all of us here at Cash Box to all of you out there. 


56 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



/ 


© Chicago Chatter 



SO another year goes by the boards. It was a good year in all phases of 
combiz— -and, it was a fruitful year, spurred on by the greatly accelerated 
burgeoning of the young audio-visual machines typified by Scopitone — its hefty 
inroads in the coin machine business during ’66; the actual re-birth of the 
exciting Color-Sonics machine; Rowe-AMI’s introduction of the “Phono- Vue” 
audio-visual adaptor premiered jointly with the “Music Merchant” phonograph 
and the dollar bill acceptor; and Dave Rosen’s “Cinejukebox,” and its result- 
ant great resurgence this year. Obviously, we haven’t heard the last from 
the audio-visual area where other announcements are concerned during the 
coming months. . . . Most everyone we queried these last few weeks in 1966 
expressed confidence that 1967 shows great promise of being another banner 
year in all phases of coinbiz. 

Last Tuesday morning, December 20, we dashed out to the Flying Carpet 
Motel just near O’Hare Field where Rowe AC Mfg. Corp. executives con- 
vened with midwestern distributors to present the exciting’, new model 212 
(Rowe) coffee vending machine. The fine presentation was made by Joe Bar- 
ton, national sales manager; Robert Martin and Tom Fenton, of the Sales 
Training-Development Dept., of which Martin is manager. Also representing 
the factory were Rowe AC Prexy Jack Harper, Dick Mueller, Paul Huebsch, 
Phil Glover and Gordon Winfield. . . . Among the distributors on hand were: 
For Atlas Music Co., Chicago, Eddie Ginsburg, Sam Gersh, Bill Phillips, Bob 
Fabian, Chuck Harper and Stan Levin. . . . From Milwaukee and Pioneer Sales 
& Services came: Joel Kleiman, Dan Karolzik, and Jerry Groll. . . . Harry 
Silverberg, of W. B. Music in Kansas City, came in with general manager 
Jerry Becker (better lose that excess weight, Jerry!), and Jim Jackson. . . . 
Pete Entringer’s Advance Distributing group from St. Louis, Mo. included: 
Hank Sheafer, Elmer Jansen, and Roger Price. . . . Kenny Glenn, of K. C. 
Sales & Services in St. Paul, Minnesota, came in solo for the session. . . . Also 
on hand was A. E. (Art) Frey, of Everpure, Inc., who provides water treat- 
ment equipment to Rowe AC Mfg. Corp. for their coffee machines. . . . As 
usual, the irrepressible photog, Joe P. Gino, was on hand to record the day’s 
activities in pictures. . . . Daniel P. (Handsome Dan) Collins, ex-Seeburg vice 
prexy, and presently manager of distributor relations for RCA-Victor’s Record 
Division, extends best season’s greetings to his great host of friends from his 
new diggin’s in Manhattan in an appropriately tinseled and illustrated Christ- 
mas card. . . . Williams Electronic Mfg. Corp. is the scene, Friday, December 
23, for the annual gala Christmas party, traditional every year, which is easily 
the one big gathering in coinbiz in Windy City. Most of us always look forward 
to greeting and meeting old friends during this heavily attended bash. Among 
the Williams hosts on the so-called receiving line (the long bar!) are: Prexy and 
general manager Sam Stern, Herb Oettinger, Buddy Lurie, Jack Mittel, Billy 
DeSelm, Hank Dabek, my favorite telephone gal LaVerne, and so many, many 
more. . . . We also expect to encounter such Seeburg executives as Louis J. 
Nicastro, William (Bill) Adair, Frank (Santa!) Luppino, Edward Claffey, 
Stanley Jarocki, Bill Prutting, Joe Hards, among others. . . . We extend sea- 
son’s greetings to Dvnaball (Company’s Sam and Frances Berger and Dusty 
Hohbein. . . . Ditto to Paul and Rosemary Huebsch and all the little Huebsches. 

. . . Art and Kay Weinand and family. . . . Sorry we had to miss the exciting 
Christmas party at Fischer Mfg. Co., where hosts were Ewald and Margaret 
Fischer. Frank and Mary Ann Schroeder, and Mr. & Mrs. Marve Mertes, and 
the staff of employees. . . . Lest we forget: DuKane Corp.’s Joe Lyons and 
Jim Davis. . . . Heartiest best wishes for the New Year to Harry and Rose 
Silverberg, and Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Becker, of W. B. Music in Kansas City, Mo. 
. . . The hearty returnee from Viet Nam, where he headed a USO touring 
company, Sig Sakowicz and his family. . . . We received a lovely Christmas 
card from the gang at Kay Musical Instrument Co., and extend sincerest 
Christmas and New Year greetings to Bob Keyworth, Joe Scherl, Sy Teitel- 
baum. Bob Lynch and Lou Acerra. . . . Another year of enjoying the wonder- 
ful presence of the Wonderful Leverones — Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel Leverone, 
founder-chairmen of Canteen Corporation (long may they prosper!). ... To 
all our friends at MOA — ICMOA — NAMA — COIN — and all the other 
statewide associations too numerous to mention here. . . . An especial greet- 
ing to Jim Tolisano, the new president of MOA, our best wishes for a very 
fruitful tenure in 1967, and the hopes that he can continue to accelerate the 
kind of positive action in the association that was greatly spearheaded by 
dynamic John A. (Red) Wallace in 1966. As for Fred Granger — MOA’s re- 
sourceful executive vice president and managing director — we feel certain 
that everyone in coinbiz is thrilled that he’s on hand with his ‘Gal Friday,’ 
Bonnie York, and their presence is indeed felt all the year long. . . . We’d 
like to name all our wonderful friends in the coin machine and vending indus- 
tries in this limited space, but it just isn’t possible. WE TAKE THIS OPPOR- 
TUNITY TO WISH ONE AND ALL A VERY HAPPY, HEALTHFUL AND 
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR!!! 


★ ★ ★ 

Milwaukee Mentions 

A worthwhile resolution for the New Year from the Wisconsin operators 
should certainly be to concentrate heavily (we should say more heavily!) on 
a resurgence of association activity in the statewide Wisconsin Music Mer- 
chants Association, and in the Milwaukee Coin Machine Operators Association. 
A handful of dedicated operators is, as always, striving mightily towards this 
thus far elusive goal. They certainly need the support of EVERYONE to suc- 
ceed in this vital endeavor. We URGE ALL Wisconsin and Milwaukee coinmen 
(and that includes the distributor personnel) to climb aboard the bandwagon 
. . . Pioneer Sales & Services’ Joel Kleiman, Dan Karolzik and Jerry Groll were 
in the Flying Carpet Motel, near O’Hare Field, for the Rowe AC Mfg. presen- 
tation to regional distributors of the exciting, new Rowe model 212 coffee 
machine. The presentation was very ably made by Rowe AC’s national sales 
manager Joe Barton, Bob Martin and Tom Fenton. Also on hand for the fac- 
tory were Prexy Jack Harper, Dick Mueller, Paul Huebsch, Phil Glover and 
Gordon Winfield . . . Another distrib head in attendance at the Rowe session 
was Kenny Glenn, of K. C. Sales & Services, in St. Paul, Minnesota . . . We’re 
happy to say that Bob and Bev Rondeau, and all the little Rondeaus, are NOT 
snowed in for a change. However, we get the impression from the Little 
Rondeaus that some snow is (shall we say) desirable for Christmas Day . . . 
When we headed out to Cream City last weekend we noted that the only thing 
on most of the coinfolk minds was the holidays, and all the plans to make 
it a happy holiday season . . . Nate Victor and his staff were busy setting plans 
for a bit of Christmas festivity over at S. L. London Music Co. . . . When we 
swung over to United, Inc. there was no question that all the halls were decked 
with holly . . . HAPPY NEW YEAR! 


Ccish Box 


JUKE BOX OPS 
RECORD GUIDE 


PICKS for PROGRAMMING 


The following records, selected from the CASH BOX Top 100, represent tunes ond performances which 
appear to be especiolly suitable to the juke box on location. Ops should check with their one-stops 
for availobility. 


GALLANT MEN 

Senator Dirksen (Capitol 50$5} 

98 6 

Keith (Mercury 72639; 

SNOOPY VS. THE RED BARON 

Royal Guardsmen (Laurie 3366) 

LET THE GOOD TIMES IN 

Dean Martin (Reprise 538) 

GOODNIGHT MY LOVE 

Happenings (B. T. Puppy 523) 

THAT'S LIFE 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise 531) 

BLUE AUTUMN 

Bobby Goldsboro (UA 50087) 

MAME 

Herb Alpert (A & M 823) 

TIME AFTER TIME 

Chris Montez (A & M 822) 

COMING HOME SOLDIER 

Bobby Vinton (Epic 10090) 

SUGAR TOWN 

Nancy Sinatra (Reprise 527) 


COLOR MY WORLD 

Petula Clark (Warner Bros. 5882) 

WISH YOU WERE HERE, BUDDY 

Pat Boone (Dot 16833) 

THE WHEEL OF HURT 

Al Martino (Capitol 15741) 

BANG BANG 

Joe Cuba (Tico 475) 

WACK WACK 

Young Holt Trio (Brunswick 55305) 

WORDS OF LOVE 

Mamas & Papas (Dunhill 4057) 

EGGPLANT THAT ATE CHICAGO 

Dr. West's Junk Band (Go-Go 100) 

I'M A BELIEVER 

Monkees (Colgems 1002) 

MAMA 

Cher (Imperial 66223) 

SHADOW OF YOUR SMILE 

Boots Randolph (Monument 976) 

LOOK WHAT YOU'VE DONE 

Pozo Seco Singers (Columbia 43927) 


SPECIAL CHRISTMAS PICKS 


THE FIRST CHRISTMAS CAROL 

Mike Douglas (Epic 5-10089) 

YOU'RE ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS 

Al Martino (Capitol 5311) 

SLEEP IN HEAVENLY PEACE 

Barbra Streisand (Columbia 443896) 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 


SANTA LOOKED A LOT LIKE DADDY 

Buck Owens (Capitol 5537) 

THE FIRST WORD 

Eddy Arnold (RCA 479027) 

TO HECK WITH OLE SANTA CLAUS 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32043) 

lllllllillllllillllllllllllllllllll^ 


// you are reading 
someone elses €opy of 

Cash Box 

X;. 

why not mail this coupon 


today 



CASH BOX 
1780 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 
Enclosed find my check. 

G $20 for a full year (52 weeks) subscription (United 
States, Canada, Mexico) 

Q $40 for a full year (Airmail United States, Canada, 
Mexico) 

G $30 for a full year (other countries) 

G $45 for 0 full yeor (Airmail other countries) 

NAME 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 


Please Check Proper 
Classification Below 
MY FIRM OPERATES THE 
FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT: 

JUKE BOXES □ 

AMUSEMENT GAMES □ 

CIGARETTES □ 

VENDING MACHINES G 
OTHER 


CITY STATE ZIP 

Ba Sura To Chack Businass Clasfiticotions Above! 


Cash Box — December 31j 1966 


57 



California Clippings 


Cash Box 

H DING NEWS 

This Vertriing Machine Industry's Only Newsweekly 



Breither— 35 Years of Service 



Bob Breither, right, 
vire president, vending 
sales, is congratulated 
by Seeburg Sales Corpo- 
ration president William 
F. Adair and presented 
with gold cuff links sig- 
nifying 35 years of serv- 
ice with the Chicago 
firm. Breither, always 
one to set the record 
straight, pointed out 
that service with firms 
subsequently acquired by 
Seeburg brought about 
the 35 year total. 


Would You Believe? 


Rudd-Melikian: Sales Up 531% 


WARMINSTER, PA. — Rudd-Meli- 
kian, Inc. reported here this week a 
sharp increase in fiscal 1966 net in- 
come and sales. 

A major importer and roaster of 
coffees and prime manufacturer of 
automatic coffee brewing equipment, 
the firm had net sales of $7,019,251 
for the fiscal year ending May 27, 
1966. This is an increase of $1,546,813 
or 28% over the previous year’s total 
of $5,472,438. 

Net income was $146,635 for a 
531% increase over the 1965 fiscal 
year total of $27,594. Outstandi'^g 
shares for both years were 689,964. 
Earnings per share for this past year 
were 21^ up from 4c for the prior 
year. 

Net income reported is after a pro- 
vision for deferred Federal income 
taxes of $155,000. 

In a letter to shareowners, manage- 
ment reports that “this improvement 
reflects the results of our emphasis, 
particularly during the past three 
years, on the nroduct lines — coffee and 
coffee brewing equipment — which 
have traditionally earned for the com- 
pany the best return on its invest- 
ment and effort.” 

“Being in both the coffee roasting 
business and coffee brewing eauin- 
ment manufacturing business affords 
us the unique opportunity of pursuing 
the development of new products with 
the combined approach of highly- 
skilled food technologists and profes- 
sional electro-mechanical engineers.” 

“In coffee products, in addition to 
our unique portion package of ground 
coffee in filter-tape, we are now pre- 
paring our “Old Mill” brand in bulk 
packages to facilitate expansion of 
this business further into the vending 
and institutional fields.” 

“In coffee equipment we are now 
manufacturing four different size 
units to fill the major needs of the 
on-the-job coffee-break market, from 
the small office to the large industrial 
plant.” 

In keeping with our market and 
profit objectives, it’s significant to 
note that a recently published author- 
itative study in demonstrating the 
popularity of coffee today in the 
United States, points out that our 
nation drinks three times more coffee 
than soft drinks.” 

“In addition to our primary and 
proprietary products — coffee and cof- 
fee brewing equipment — we are con- 
stantly evaluating the ever changing 
market so that we may maintain our 
cc.ripst-rlvs posture.” 

“We believe that the men and 
v v. .er. who work for this company 
i s t s of our greatest assets. During 
year, and subsequent to its 
. ' k " k'O' ; our Management has been 
strengthened with the elec- 


tion of two new officers. Frank X 
McCoy and John A. O’Hea, who both 
have had exemplary careers in mar- 
keting and sales management, were 
elected vice presidents.” 

“With the company entering its 
third decade of service. Management 
gratefully acknowledges the vital role 
played during the past 20 years by all 
of our employees, customers, sup- 
pliers, directors and shareholders. 
While the years ahead will require 
careful and constant appraisal of our 
cooperative objectives, we are confi- 
dent that our recent achievements will 
provide a basis for a productive 
future.” 


186 New Vending Firms 
Joined NAMA In 1966 

CHICAGO — A total of 186 companies 
joined the National Automatic Mer- 
chandising Association during a na- 
tionwide 30th anniversary year cam- 
paign which began in August, accord- 
ing to W. J. Manning, Jr., president. 

'The drive, which continues until the 
end of the year, has already brought 
the total membership of NAMA to 
1,675 firms, compared with 1,550 at 
the beginning of 1966. The totals do 
not include some 530 local branch 
operations of national and regional 
firms. 

During the current appeal for new 
members, 167 operating companies, 16 
suppliers and 3 machine manufacturer 
firms became members of the associa- 
tion, Manning said. 

As of December 1, the association 
had 1,424 operating company mem- 
bers, 201 supplier members and 50 
machine manufacturer members. 

“We are indebted to the team of 
volunteers working under membership 
chairman J. Richard Howard for this 
substantial increase,” Manning said. 
“Many operator members, and espe- 
cially the sales representatives of our 
manufacturers and suppliers, have 
made the contacts with new members 
which made this good showing pos- 
sible.” 

“I now appeal to all vending opera- 
tors who have thought about joining 
NAMA, but haven’t been contacted, 
to let us know they’re interested. The 
entire industry benefits from a 
stronger national association, but so 
does every operator of vending equip- 
ment,” Manning stressed. 

He said the 1966 appeal brought 
several of the larger nonmember op- 
erating firms into NAMA. 

California registered the largest in- 
crease in members (21), followed by 
! Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, New York, 
^ Ohio, and Wisconsin. 



TWO DOWN, AND ONE MORE 'TO GO. . . . With Thanksgiving and 
Christmas behind us, everyone is getting ready to batten down the hatches, 
in preparation for the final siege — New Years! We are not knocking these 
great institutions, it’s just that we have already gained 6 pounds, and we 
need a breather! All in all, as we reflect on what has happened in the past 
year, things have not gone too badly. If during the year things have been a 
little slow, the month of December has more than made up for the other 
eleven. We are looking forward, as we hope everyone else is, to the coming 
new year being bigger and better than ever. We are in the spirit of 67! 

NATE HOCKMAN JOINS FORCES WITH WURLITZER. . . . Nat, 
formerly with Struve Distributing, and of late. Advance Automatic, has joined 
the Wurlitzer family as their New England representative. We are very sorry 
to see him leave, but we wish him well in his new position. Glad to hear that 
Clayton Ballard’s daughter and son-in-law, Lt. & Mrs. William Hofmann, 
managed to get here for the holidays, despite some car trouble. Bob Collyer 
touring the San Diego area, while Johnny Morrison is covering the San 
Bernardino territory. 

OPEN HOUSE FOR ONE AND ALL. . . . The “holiday spirit” is very 
much in evidence at C. A. Robinson Co. The open house will last thru the rest 
of the week, with invites going out to all operators and — competitors, for 
that matter. A1 Bettleman is proving to be an affable bartender and dispenser 
of good cheer. Hank Tronick says that the open house is serving another 
purpose, besides the obvious one of getting people into the store. By the 
time you read this he hopes to have a brand new model of pool table on the 
showroom floor. Hank wouldn’t disclose the brand name, he said that we, like 
everyone else on Pico Blvd., would have to come in and see for ourselves. We 
hear that Alan Anderson, veteran operator from Shafter, was in visiting long 
time buddy, Charlie Robinson. Hank told us that since we last spoke, his 
son Mike won another award. Mike who attends Van Nuys High School, was 
selected as senior of the year and presented with an award by the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars award. 

FROM THE RECORD RACKS. . . . The Solle sisters at Luenhagen tell us that 
they received a call from C&W recording artist. Hank Penny, and he says that 
as soon as he finishes recording, he will bring the record in for the girls 
to hear. The “monster” of the week over there seems to be “Tell It Like It 
Is” by Aaron Neville on Parlow. . . . From California Music, Buddy Robinson 
tells us that “Snoopy V.S. the Red Baron” is still taking pot shots at the 
Morkees, who are still riding high on the charts with “I’m A Believer” and 
“I’m Not Your Stepping Stone.” Many record stores have told us that people 
who have not been in a record store in years, are coming in specifically to 
buy both Snoopy and the Monkees. In the album department the Monkees are 
still to pbut “Got Live If You Want It” by the Rolling Stones on London, is 
moving up fast. 

HERE AND THERE. . . . Out of Circle International we get the info that 
Dean McMurdie spent a few days in San Diego, while at the same time 
Don Edwards was touring Las Vegas. At present Ken Smith is in Long Beach 
calling on ops. Also hear that they are eagerly awaiting another shipment of 
the Rowe AMI “Music Merchant.” . . . Sorry to hear that Bob Portale of 
Advance Automatic was a bit under the weather for a few days. While he was 
out, Frank Mencuri did a fine job of holding down the fort. . . . Marvin Miller 
was very pleased to report that Coin Machine Service just received their first 
shipment of the Federal line machines and that the response has been very 
good. For the man that has everything — ivory que balls. Marvin says that 
he sold some of these to a friend of Joey Bishop’s for a birthday present for 
Joey. We are also told that they received a huge shipment of the new All-Tech 
pool tables. 



Upper Mid-West Musings 


Cap Keister, in town for the day making the rounds and buying records and 
parts. . . . Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Sanford, in town for the day picking up parts 
and records. . . . Lawrence Sieg, Eau Claire, in the cities on a buying trip. . . . 
George Wohler, Stillwater, in town for the day and let it be known that 
he was elected as a council man . . . Jim Stansfield Jr. in town for the day. . . . 
Arnold Brevik, Watertown, in the cities for the day making the rounds and 
buying parts and records. . . . Don Hazelwood in the cities for the day. Don’s 
son, who is in the Air Force, and has flown'his quota of missions in Viet Nam, 
is on his way home and will be home in time for Christmas. . . . Our deepest 
sympathy to Roy Foster on the suddent death of his wife. . . . Ernest Woytos- 
sek and his son in town for the day on a buying trip. . . . Mr. & Mrs. Gordon 
Runnberg in the cities for the day as was Eddie Kubes of New Prague. . . . 
Mr & Mrs. Jack Backus in town for a few days vacation. . . . Phil Moss, Des 
Moines, in town for a few hours. Flew up in his own plane in an hour. . . . 
Mr. & Mrs. Clayton Norberg and their two children leave for Hawaii Wednes- 
day 22nd. for a three week vacation. They will have a wonderful reunion with 
their two daughters that are going to school there. . . . Clem Kaul in the 
cities for the day picking up parts and records. . . . Mr. & Mrs. Ed Petek, in 
town for a few days vacation. . . . Ritchie Hawkins in town for the day buying 
records and parts. 

★ ★ ★ 



Happy Birthday This Week To: 

Forest J. Hiser, Fort Wayne, Indiana. . . . Frank P. Feigl, Chicago, Illinois. 
. . . Robert Breither, Chicago, Illinois. . . . Arthur E. Davis, Knoxville, Tenn. 
. . . T. R. Noto, Navasota, 'Texas. . . . Joe Robbins, Chicago, Illinois. . . . 
Maxine Robinson Meale, Cincinnati, Ohio. . . . Elmer F. Benjamin, Santa 
Monica, Calif. . . . Howard A. Herman, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. . . . John W. Oomens, 
Glenview, Illinois. . . . James M. Browning, Dallas, Texas. . . . Robert Portall, 
San Francisco, California. . . . Bert B. Davidson, No. Tonawanda, N.Y. . . . 
Sol Schwartz, Los Angeles, California. . . . Wm. A. Thompson, Long Beach, 
Calif. . . . Herman C. Creswell, Jr., Milan, Tenn. . . .Myrtle H. Singley, Shreve- 
port, Louisiana. 


Cash Box— -December 31, 1966 


UMC: Forty Yea rs 
In The Vending Line 

ST. LOUIS — UMC -Industries, Inc. 
(formerly Universal Match Corpora- 
tion) has been closely associated with 
the automatic merchandising- industry 
since the mid-1920s. 

At that time, UMC — a small com- 
pany producing only match books — 
saw the important part matches could 
play in the sale of cigarettes from 
machines, which at the time was it- 
self a small field. In close association 
■with operators of the machines, UMC 
worked to make match books an ef- 
fective part of machine merchandis- 
ing of cigarettes. Through the years, 
the company has pioneered in many 
improvements in match book design 
and packaging, for more efficient and 
effective use in vending. 

In the mid-1950s, when UMC was 
ready to undertake a major expan- 
sion program, vending was regarded 
as a natural area to explore. The 
firm began looking for manufacturers 
with strong records of leadership. 

In 1956, UMC bought its St. Louis 
neighbor. National Vendors, the 
world’s largest manufacturer of ciga- 
rette and candy machines, and an im- 
portant producer of other vending 
machines — which then set and con- 
tinue to set industry standards for 
quality and performance. 

The same year, UMC acquired a 
substantial interest in another St. 
Louis firm. National Rejectors, Inc. 
This company is the world’s largest 
producer of money validating and 
handling equipment for the vending 
industry. NRI became a wholly owned 
subsidiary in 1959. 

In 1960, UMC bought Glasco Cor- 
poration, the pioneers in the pre-mix 
soft-drink machine field. Glasco, now 
a division of UMC Industries, has its 
plant and headquarters at Barnhart, 
Mo. 

In July, 1961, UMC acquired ex- 
clusive North American distribution 
and assembly rights for the versatile 
vending machine line of Wittenborg, 
Denmark. The Danish firm is a lead- 
ing producer of hot and cold food and 
general merchandise vendors in Eu- 
rope. 

The acquisition of Lennox Manu- 
facturing Company, of Chicago in 
the spring of 1964, gave UMC added 
strength in the beverage vendor field. 
Lennox, which now is a UMC divi- 
sion, is an outstanding producer of 
beverage vending equipment. Its prod- 
ucts include National Vendors’ cold 
drink and hot beverage merchan- 
disers. 

As UMC Industries has expanded 
in the field of automatic merchandis- 
ing, it has held to these goals: to 
unite proven leaders, thus giving 
them greater strengths to serve the 
vending industry, and to advance the 
development of automatic merchan- 
dising. 


ARA Announces 
Record Earnings 
For 1966: Up 21% 

PHILADELPHIA — Automatic Retail- 
ers of America, Inc., announced new 
record highs in sales and earnings for 
its 1966 fiscal year ended Sept. 30. 

Davre J. Davidson, chairman, re- 
ported preliminary figures showed 
revenues rose to $303,540,000 vs. 
$260,104,000 for 1965. Pre-tax income 
rose to $13,251,000 — a 21 per cent 
gain over last year. Net income in- 
creased to $7,748,000 from $6,536,000 
— an increase of 19 per cent. Earnings 
per share in the recent period were 
$2.30 — an increase of 15 per cent. This 
earnings per share figure is after the 
retirement of convertible securities 
into common stock during the second 
half of the year. 

Davidson noted that pre-tax profits 
rose more rapidly than revenues, re- 
fiecting company efficiency programs 
for profit improvement 

In May and June all convertible 
debt and preferred securities were 
called, increasing book value per com- 
mon shares, raising equity as per cent 
of total capitalization, and increasing 
financial strength. Earnings per share 
before conversion would have been 
$2.35. 


^^The Flying Wedge Four^^ 



Season’s Greetings to Our Many Friends 


CHICAGO COIN’S 


Thank You for the 
Wonderful Reception! 


Operators Everywhere State: 
This is a real Money-Maker . 
with great Player Appeal!” 


STILL GOING STRONG! 


A Realistic Telescopic Sight! 
Two Separate Target Areas! 


Mfrs. \ 
of 

PROVEN 

PROFIT MAKERS 
, Since . 
k 1931 ,4 


STILL DELIVERING 


YOU CAN’T MISS 


CHICAGO COIN MACHINE DIV. 

CHICAGO DYNAMIC INDUSTRIES 


1725 W. DIVERSEY BLVD., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60614 


Johnson, Ross, Gregg and Peteet Whiz Into Houston 



Taking a break between seminars at 
Gulf Coast, Wurlitzer service manager 
C. B. Ross, left, strikes a proud pose 
with L. C. Butler, head of Gulf Coast. 
Classes were held in the new Ramada 
Inn in Houston — first time ever for 
a factory school in the area. 


HOUSTON— L. C. Butler, president 
of Gulf Coast Distributing Company, 
was host in November to a -visiting 
team of Wurlitzer field service engi- 
neers — the “Flying Wedge Four’’ of 
Walt Peteet, Karel Johnson, Harry 
Gregg and C. B. Ross — conducting 
the first factory service school ever 
held in the area. Subject was the 
Wurlitzer “Americana” coin-operated 


phonograph. 

Butler treated many of the attend- 
ees to seats in the Houston Astro- 
dome for a look at the Clay-Williams 
boxing match, then back it was to the 
new Ramada Inn for the classes. 
Butler said the attendance “was out- 
standing — everybody got what they 
came for.” Then the Flying Wedge 
Four moved on. 


The Flying Wedge 
Four, left to right: Ross, 
Karel Johnson, Harry 
Gregg and Walt Peteet, 
sans parachute. Minutes 
later they packed their 
bags and disappeared 
into the sunset. 



Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


59 




MANUFACTURERS NEW EQUIPMENT 

CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION 


ALL-TECH INDUSTRIES 
Ace New Yorker (4?"x85'') 
Gold Crest 6 (46"'x78^ 

Gold Crest 7 (52''x92’') 

Gold Crest 8 (57"x101") 
Gold Crest 9 (64"xn4") 
Champion Slot _Car_ 

Sett! Cor Kiddie Ride 
Chuck Wogon 
Sante Fe Express 
Fire Engine 
Stage Cooch 
Indian Scout 
Satellite Explorer 
Helicopter 


AMERICAN MACHINE & FOUNDRY CO. 

American Speedwoy 
Little Indy 


AMERICAN SHUFFLEBOARD CORP. 

Electro "6" 6' (6-pkt. table) 

Electro "7" (7' 6-pkt. table) 

Electro "8" (8' 6-pkt. table) 

Classic "6" (6' 6-pkt. table) 

Classic "7" (7' 6-pkt. toble) 

Classic "8" (8' 6-pkt. table) 

Imperial Shutfleboard (16' to 22') 

Imperial Cushion Model (12') 

Bank Shot Model (9') 

Shuttle '88' 


AUTOMATICS PRODUCTS COMPANY 

Smokeshop "Satellite" 630; 18 Sel. Cap. 630 
Smokeshop "Satellite" 850; 27 Sel. Cap. 850 
Smokeshop Modular "900"; 18 Sel. Cap. 900 
Candyshop "100" Ten Columns 400 Capacity — 
Candy; Six Columns. 200 Capacity— Gum & 
Mint. First in-First out Feature. Multiple 
Pricing. Changemaker Optional. 


AUTO PHOTO CO. 

Model 12 Studio 


BALLY MFG. CO. 

Loop The Loop 2P (9/66) 
Campus Queen 4P (8/66) 

Six Sticks 6P (3/66) 

Folies Bergeres Bingo (11/65) 
1966 Bally Bowler A/66) 
Deluxe Fun Cruise IP (11/66) 
Bazaar IP (11/66) 


CHICAGO COIN MACHINE 

Kicker IP (8/66) 

Hula-Hula 2P (5/66) 

Imperial Puck Bowler 6P (9/66) 
TV Baseboll 2P (3/66) 

Flair Bowler (9/66) 

Super Scope Gun (10/66) 


COIN AMUSEMENT 

V-Back Shutfleboard 


COLOR-SONICS, INC. 

Colorama 2600 

Combo 152 (To be released) 


DANCARR MUSIC 

Wollbox conversion unit 


DuKANE CORP. 

Ski 'n Shore 
Grand Prix Racewoy 
Tag-lt 


FISCHER MFG. CO., INC. 

COIN 

Empress 10! (101") 

Empress 92 (92") 

Regent 91 (91") 

Regen; H (77") 

Fiesta 

77C (77" x 45" x 31Vi") 
Regent 35C (3' x 6') 

. Rsgent S :C'(92" x 52" x 31Vi") 


J. F. FRANTZ MFG. CO. 

Little Leaguer (12/62) 
Double Header (12/62) 
Save Our Business 
U.S. Marshall 5^ Gun 
Kicker & Catcher 
ABT Challenge Pistol 
ABT Guesser Scale 
ABT Rifle Sport 
Aristo Scale 


D. GOTTLIEB CO. 

Dancing Lady 4P (11/66) 


PAUL W. HAWKINS MFG. 

Rodeo Pony 

Mustang 

Pony Cort 

Ben Hur Chariot 

Twin Quarterhorse 

Derby Pony Jr. 

Leo The Lion 
Sam The Clown 
Donny Duck 


INTERNATIONAL MUTOSCOPE 

Photomatic 60's 
Plasti-Motie 
Balloon-O-Mat 
Snack Bar 
Pony Cart 


IRVING KAYE CO., INC. 

NON-COIN MODELS 
Deluxe Continental (4Vi'x9') 

Ambassador 70 (85"x47") 

Ambassador 75 (92"x52") 

Ambassador 80 (I06"x58") 

Ambossador 90 (I14"x64") 

COIN-OP MODELS 

Deluxe Eldorado "66" 5 Pkt. Series 
Mark I, 77x45 
Mark II, 86x48 
Mark III, 92x52 
Mark IV, 106x58 
Mark V, 114x64 
Deluxe Satellite, 77x45 
Deluxe Klub Pool 
Regular 56x40 
Jumbo 75x48 

Ring-0 Round Pool Table (56" diameter) 


MARVEL MFG. CO. 

Side-Rail Elect. Scoreboard 
Coin Box 

Cross-mount Scoreboard 


MIDWAY MFG. CO. 

Captain Kid Rifle (9/66) 

Premier Puck Shuffle (4/66) 

Little League Baseball 

Mystery Score (8/65) (Novelty Game) 


MONDIAL INTERNATIONAL 

Mondial Shoeshine 


NATIONAL SHUFFLEBOARD & 
BILLIARD CO. 

COIN-OP MODELS 
Coronet I 46x78 
Coronet II 52x92 
Coronet III 5^105 
Coronet IV 63x113 


PATTERSON INT'L CORP. 

Foosball Match 
Flip Match 
Drag Strip 


Model 500 160-Sel. Stereo Speaker Wallbox 3 

level personal pushbutton volume control 

Model 501 100-Sel. Wallbox 

500F 160-Sel. Wallbox (50d chute) 

501 F 160-Sel. Wallbox (50d chute) 

502 Universal Wall Box Bar Bracket 

1989 Money Counter for Model 418-SA, 424, 
425, 426 


DAVID ROSEN, INC. 

Cinejukebox (audioviz) 
Phono-Voice Recorder 


ROCK-OLA MFG. CO. 

Caravel le (20 Col. 800 Packs) Model 3002 
Cigarette Machine 

Model 433 GP/Imperial phonograph. 160 selec- 
tions, 45-33rpm stereo-monaurol intermix. 
Console size. 

Model 432 GP/160 phonograph. 160 selections, 
45-33rpm stereo-monaural intermix. Compact 
size. 

Model 431 Coronado phonograph. 100 selections, 
45-33rpm stereo-monaurol intermix. Compact 
size. 

Model 430 100-Scl. Wall Phono (33-1/3 Op- 
tional). 

1628 Deluxe "Stereo Twins" Speakers 

1631 "Stereo Twins Jr" Speakers_ 

1984 Remote Volume Control Unit 


ROWE MANUFACTURING 

PHONOGRAPH 

Rowe AMI "Music Merchant" — Model MM-1 
without dollar bill acceptor. Model MM-2 with 
dollar bill acceptor. "Stereo-Round" Musicon- 
sole — 3-in-l programming — 200-160-100 se- 
lections — personalized panel. Album and 
single record pricing accepts dollar bills, half 
dollars, quarters, dimes and nickels. Plays 
33-1/3 and 45 r.p.m. records intermixed, 
stereo or monaural. Phonovue 120-sel. audio- 
viz component. 

MUSIC EQUIPMENT 

Wollbox— "Wall-Ette" #WRA and #WRB— 
remote 200 selection "Stereo Round" speoker 
wallbox. Height 13%". Width 1614". Depth 
6V4". Push-button volume control. Exclusive 
waitress call light button. Twelve album dis- 
play merchandisers. Persnalization panel. Half 
dollor chute. Twin 30° angle stereo speakers. 
Unitized selector and speaker assembly. Flip- 
out title pa^e unit. Swing-out, litt-ott door. 
Can be serviced from reor or front. Plug-in 
components. 

HJG— Hideaway — selective stereo — 200 sel. 

HGG — Hidewoy — selective stereo — 160 sel. 

HHG — Hideway — selective stereo — 100 sel. 

R — 2092-A — Discotheque Speakers — Console 
Cabinets. 

EX-401— Wall Speakers. 

BACKGROUND MUSIC SYSTEMS 

Customusic Prooramaster — background tape 
music system— 60 hours of continuous music. 
Exclusive teatue avoids repeating selections In 
same sequence. Three exclusive libraries — 
commercial, atmosphere, and production. 
Available in tape or 9" records. 

CMR-1 Message Repeater — self-contoined rec- 
ord playback device tor automatically making 
in-store announcements. 

270— Celebrity First In — First Out; 440 condy, 
200 gum and mint capacity. Also pastry col- 
umns; changemaker. 

277 — Celebrity — 11 columns, 340 items capacity. 

77 — Candy Merchandiser — 11 columns. 340 
items — chanqpmoker. Small cobinet model. 

CIGARETTE VENDORS 

160 — Rowe Riviera Cigorette Console — 20 col- 
umns, 800-pack capacity. Electric coin mech- 
anism with mechonicol totalizer — personali- 
zation panel. Sove-a-match feature. 

260— Celebrity Cigarette — 20_ columns — 800 
packs. Same teatues as Riviera in Celebrity 
cabinet. 

286— Celebrity Cigarette — 14 columns, 510 
packs. Manual coin mechanism with mechan- 
ical totalizer. 

86 — Cigarette Vendor — 14 columns, 510 packs. 
Manual coin mechanism with mechanical to- 
talizer. Small cabinet model. 

DOLLAR BILL CHANGERS 

6 — Dollar Bill Changer. World's first dollor bill 
changer. $150 and $300 capacity. Heavy duty 
floor model. 


THE SEEBURG CORP. 

PHONOGRAPHS 

Seeburq Stereo Showcase 

160-selections, 33-1/3 ond 45 rpm, stereo-mono 
play, rotating album display, optional dollar 
bill occepter and Income Totalizer System, 
balanced tone arm transistorized. 

HLPC-1 — Stereo LP Hideawav. 160 selections 
(Up to 480 selections with all album program 
minal. Income Totalizer. Plavs 33-1/3 ond 
45 RPM records intermixed. Album and uni- 
versal pricing. 

SC-1 — Stereo Consolctte. 160 selections. Used 
for remote selection of any record on LP 
Console or Hideaway. Personalized panel. 
Album display panel. Album pricing. Push- 
button volume control. Twin stereo speakers. 
Remote Income Totalizer. Polished chrome or 
cooper finish. 

EBCS-1 — Extended Bass Consolette Speaker. 
Provides full range stereo response in con- 
iunction with Consolette speakers. 

SC-11 — Stereo Communication Consolette. Con- 
solette serves as Intercom. 

CIM-1— Consolette Intercom Master Unit. Used 
with Stereo Communicotion Consolette. 

BACKGROUND MUSIC 

ICK-1 — Intercommunicotion Consolette Kit. Con- 
verts Stereo Consolette to Stereo Communica- 
tion Consolette. 

BMS-2 — Background Music System 1000 Selee^ 
tions. 

BMC-1 — Bockground Music Compact, 1,000 Se- 
lections. 

BMCA-1 — Background Music Componion Audio. 
Used with Background Music Compact (BMC- 
1) 


MPE-1 — Electronic Memory Programmer. Used 
with the Background Music Compact (BMC- 
1) to insert special announcements and com- 
mercials Into the background music program. 

SABMC-1 — Seeburg Automatic Background Mu- 
sic Center. For use with FM Multiplex Tele- 
phone Lines and On-Premise Locations. Total 
of 11214 hours of music. 

SEP-1 — Seeburg Encore Phonograph. 760 Selec- 
tions of Foreground Music. 

CANDY VENDORS 

WIOCNI-Mechontcal. 10 Selections. 220 bar 
capacity. 

W8TIG — Mechanical 8 Selections. 152 bar 

capacity. 

CIGARETTE VENDORS 

4E6 — Electric. 22 Selections. 825 pack capacity. 

W20T1 — Mechanical. 20 Selections. 672 pack 
capacity. 

W14T1 — Mechanical. 14 Selections. 510 pack 
capacity. 

MCC-20 — Mechanical. 20 Selections. 720 pack 
copacity. 


TEL-ASIGN 

Scopitone audio-visual machine. 

26-inch screen, 36 film selections, continuous 
reel-to-reel 16mm projection system, 15 watts 
sound power. 


UNITED BILLIARDS 

COIN-OPERATED TABLES 
"100" (78x46) 

"200" (88x51) 

"300" (93 X 53) 

"400" (103 X 58) 

"500" (114 X 64) 


URBAN INDUSTRIES 

Movie Theaters 
Model AP-IO 
Panoram 


U.S. BILLIARDS, INC. 

Electro-Pool, Electric Pocket Billiard Game. 

6 Pkt. Series: 

Pro 1—78x46 
Pro 2—88x51 
Pro 3—93x53 
Pro 4— 103x58 
Pro 5 — 114x64 

Club Pool 
56x40 
75x43 

Coin-A-Copy (Photocopy unit) 


VALLEY SALES CO. 

Bumper Pool® 

Model 522S/W Reg. Size 
Model 785A— 78x45 
Model 875A— 88x50 
Model 935A— 93x53 
Model 1035—100x57 
El Magnitico Series 
Model 884—88x50 
Model 934—93x53 
Model 1014— lOlx'7 


WILLIAMS MFG. CO. 

Casanova 2P (12/66) 
Encore Puck Bowler (9/66) 
Aztec Bowler (9/66) 


THE WURLITZER COMPANY 

PHONOGRAPHS 
Americana Model 3100 

200-selections, stereo-mono, solid-state ampli- 
fier, 25 watts per channel panoramic pictorial 
dome panel display or optnonal dollar bill ac- 
ceptor, Golden Bar feature. 

REMOTE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 
5220 Wall Box 200 Select!on-10^-25<-504 

with L.L.P. 

5220A Wail Box 200 Selection-IOd-254-504 

with L.L.P. 

5225 Wall Box 100 Selection-10^254-504 with 
Speakers, Top Tunes Golden Bar and L.L.P. 
5225A Wall Box 100 Selection-lO^-ZS^-SOr* 

with L.L.P. 

5010 Wall Box Ten Top Tune$-504 coin only 
2S9B Stepper 100 Selection for Model 3010 
261 B Stepper 200 Selection tor Model 3000 
5121 Speaker — Private — Wurlitzer Wall Box 

Mounting 

5121A Speaker — Private — Woll Mounting 
5123 Speaker — Woll 12" Coaxial 
5125B Speaker — Extender (Pocked in Poirs) 
Speaker — Directional (Packed in Poirs) 


^0 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 


NOTICE 

EARLY CLOSING NEXT 
WEEK, ALL COPY MUST 
BE RECEIVED IN NEW 
YORK BY WEDNESDAY 
DECEMBER 28. 


Charley, M^Boy! 



The man with the glass of cheer in 
his right hand and the glowing Rowe 
AMI “Music Merchant” under his left 
is Chuck Nye of Tri-City Music, Cali- 
fornia. Chuck was the first phono- 
graph operator on the West Coast to 
have a “Music Merchant” on location, 
complete with the dollar bill acceptor. 


Lenzer Upped At 
Interstate United 

LINCOLNWOOD, ILL. — Lester R. 
Lenzner has been promoted to as- 
sistant to the vice president of opera- 
tions, Lorron G. Caryl, for Interstate 
United, it was announced today by 
Lorron G. Caryl, vice president, opera- 
tions, Interstate United. 

In his new capacity he will assist 
the vice president of operations in all 
administrative and operational areas. 
Prior to this promotion, Lenzner was 
Western Division vending director for 
Interstate United in Los Angeles. 

Lenzner joined the Chicago-based 
food and vending company nine years 
ago. Before that he was the Western 
Division Sales Supervisor at Cantrell 
and Cochrane, Los Angeles. 


Walker Reports On 
American Tobacco's 
Profits For 1966 

NEW YORK — Robei-t B. Walker, 
president and chairman of the board 
of The American Tobacco Company, 
termed 1966 “an eventful year for the 
Company — not only in sales and earn- 
ings progress, but in changes designed 
to broaden our capacity for growth.” 

“Despite rising costs, we are head- 
ing for a successful year, judging by 
third-quarter results and projections 
for the remainder of 1966,” Mr. 
Walker said. Dollar sales and net in- 
come for the first nine months were 
$1,085,007,000 and $65,595,000, re- 
spectively. 

The Company’s volume of filter cig- 
arette sales showed a noticeable in- 
crease for the year while the volume 
of nonfilter cigarettes followed a gen- 
eral industry decline. In sharp con- 
trast to a downward trend of the cigar 
industry, American Tobacco’s Cigar 
Division, the nation’s third largest 
cigar manufacturer, scored impres- 
sive gains throughout 1966. 

Sunshine Biscuits’ operations, ac- 
cording to Walker, “are beginning to 
show a favorable trend. We expect 



4-P^a^ 




9 Big-Action Features 


Superb light-box animation presents a 
• beautiful ballerina dancing on stage 
throughout play of game. 


n New carousel roto-unit scores up to 500 
points on numbered targets and ‘‘shoot 
again" feature on star target. 


2 Full top to bottom exciting playboard 
action. 



CT New decagon score-indicating unit gives 
ultra-efficient performance 


New automatic electric ball-lift for faster 


more convenient play. 


New, illuminated, score-card holder in- 
• eludes new easy-to-read ‘‘Balls to Play" 
and “Game Over" lights. 

Q New, all-stainless steel front molding, pro- 
vides a fresh clean appearance and com 
forfable feel. 

Q New, triple coin-chute combinations, now 
available for increased convenience and 
earning power. 


Season^s Qreetings 


Sunshine to be an important factor 
in both our immediate and long-range 
growth plans.” Another promising 
nontobacco venture was an agreement 
signed in December for the purchase 
of a majority interest in the James 
B. Beam Distilling Co. The Chicago- 
based distributor of Jim Beam Ken- 
tucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey and 
other liquor products reported sales 
of $100,812,331 and net income of 
$7,024,314 for the year ended June 
30, 1966. 

Walker’s outlook for 1967 is one 
of guarded optimism: “While we ex- 
pect to benefit from the 2% growth 
prediction for the industry, our specu- 
lations must take into account the 
shifting climates in which the tobacco 
industry operates today. We look to- 
ward significant improvements in our 
profit picture from improved plant 
efficiency with resultant reductions in 


operating costs. Present diversifica- 
tion and the addition of the Beam 


Company should enhance return on 
investment of the Company’s capital.” 


■TAKE ADVANTAGE 
ANNUAL JANUARY 


OF CLEVELAND COIN MACHINE'S" 
SALE FOR IMMEDIATE CLEARANCE 


Up to 100 Various 
types of 

SHUFFLE ALLEYS 
At $75 each — in iots 
of 5 or more $50 
pius an additionai 
$15 for crating. 
Ciean and in working 
order. 

5 FLINT STONE 
AGE KIDDIE RIDES 
$295 each 
Beautiful condition 
WE NEED 
Scoring Glass for 
Genco 2 PI. Basket- 
ball. 

PIN GAMES 

Buckaroo. North Star, 
Rack-A-Ball, Cara- 
velle. World’s Fair, 
Kings & Queens, 
Bank-A-Ball. 

MUSIC 

A.M.I. models H-l-J- 
K-200 preferably me- 
chanicals. 

BOWL-A-RAMAS 


PIN GAMES 

A Go-Go, 4 pi. . . . 
Aces High, 4 pi 
Bonanza 2 pi. 

Bronco 2 pi. . 

Bull Fight 1 pi 
Eager Beaver 2 pi. 
Hula Hula 2 pi 
Kicker 1 pi, . 
Paradise 2 pi. 
Seashore 2 pi. 

Slick Chick 1 pi. 
Sweetheart 1 pi. 

Top Hand 1 pi. 
Thorobred 2 pi. 
Pot-O-Gold 2 pi. 


$595 

350 

295 

225 

325 

345 

395 

325 

395 

315 

195 

225 

345 

375 

425 


MUSIC 


Wurlitzer 

2500 $450 

2600 550 

2700 650 

2800 750 

2900 825 

A.M.I. 

Lyric $295 

Continental 2-200 . 425 

J.A.L 475 

Tropicana 650 

Diplomat 775 


ROCK-OLA 

1455 $210 

1465 265 

1475 315 

1485 395 

1495 465 

SEEBURG W 

201 $365 

222 450 

AQ-160 475 

AY-160 595 

DS-160 645 


CC^V^LAND 



61 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 





ADVERTISING SECTION 




, JD AO RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

clksStFlED ADVERTISING. If cash or check is not enclosed with order 
yoHf ad will be held for following issue pen ding rec eipt of your check or cosh. 

WQTIC^ S’2 Ciassified Advertisers. (Outside USA add $52 to your present subscription 
arie«). Tcs: or« entitled to a classified ad of 40 words in each week s issue tor a 
aS One Fuii Year 52 consecutive weeks. You are allowed to change your Classified Ad 
if you so desire All words over 40 will be billed at the rote of 20c per 
^ Pieose count words carefully. Be sure your Classified Ad is sent to f®?®'', New York 
psblicetien office by Wednesday, 12 Noon, of preceding week to appear in the follow- 
infi week's issue. 

CiossifiecS Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

S®ft4 ali copy to: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y, 


RECORD RIOT, 455, BRAND NEW RECORDS. 
Some late hits, $6.50 per 100, $65.00 per 
1000. All orders shipped irnmediately. bena 
check with order for prepaid Postag^ Ordy 
in United States. RELIABLE 
BOX 136, GLEN OAKS POST OFFICE, GLEN 
OAKS, N.Y. 11004 PHONE: (212) 343-5881. 


FOR SALE; OFF OUR OWN ROUTES, CLEAN, 
mechanically reconditioned, 5 Balls 
Along, Flying Chariots, El Toro: 51 /P- 
Jumpin Jacks, Gi Gi: 5' 

Sunset, Lancer, Tom Tom, $135. Big 0®®j < 
Aloha, Flying Circus, Preview, Ro^ck A Ball, 
Cover Girl, $125. Foto Finish, Tropic Isle, 
$100 00. Atlas, Double Action, Gondolier, 
Lite A Card, Melody Lane, 7 Seas, Made- 
moiselle, Roto Pool, Miss Annabel e, $75. 
STAN HARRIS CO., 508 W. VENANGO ST., 
PHILA., PA. PHONE BA 3-5362. 


ATTENTIONI we are THE TRADE S LARGEST 
suppliers of Pool Table supplie^ slates, 
cues, balls, cloth, etc. Best quality, lowest 
Dnces write or phone tor our new catalog 
EaItERN N(3VELTY DISTRIBUTORS, 37* 
TONNELE AVE., NORTH BERGEN. N. J. 
(Tel. UNion 3-8627). 


SEEBURG L.P.C. #480, ROCKOLA OI^ND 
Prix and many others. Sove Money — Write 
rsr Wire vouT needs. Lowest Prices. bbA- 
CO/^T DISTRIBUTORS, 1200 NORTH AVE., 
ELIZABETH, N.J. (Tel: Bl 8-3524). 

KLOPP COIN COUNTERS WE MANUFACTURE 
and sell the finest low priced coin counting- 
packaging and coin sorfino machine? avail- 
able. Write for ^ofads- KLOeP ENGINEER- 
ING, INC. 35561 SCHOOLCRAFT RD. LI- 
VONIA, MICHIGAN 48151. 


NT 


AVAILABLE; COIN MACHINE MECHANIC — 
slots, consoles, bingos. 35 years experience. 
Sober, finest, relioble. Car, tools, will go 
anywhere. PINKY HUGHES, 2517 Mountain 
Road, Pasadena, Moryand. 

USED SIX-CARD PINBALL MACHINES: .BAR- 
rel-O-Fun. Lotto Fun, Shoot-A-Line, Lite-A- 
Line, Venus, Super Wildcats. Uprights: Red 
Arrow, Flashback, Shawnee & Sweet Shaw- 
nee. Write: MONROE D. BRANDT 829 
EAST MARKET ST., YORK, PA. PHONE; 
755-3129. 

LP.'#, CUTOUTS, OVERSTOCKS, CLOSEOUTS 
SURPLUS. ANY LABELS. For premiums and 
fllveoways. New merchandise only. We pay 
cosh. Small or large lots. EMPIRE DIST^B- 
UTING CO., 4610 LIBERTY AVE., PITTS- 
BURGH 24, PA. (Tel. (412) 682-8437). 

WANTED: WILD ARROWS. Write or phpi^: 
fSnEST JOHN'S, 2456 LAS VEGAS BLVD., 
SOUT H, LAS VEC^AS, NEVADA, 382-3633. 

USED 45 RPM RECORDS, ALL TYPES AS 
they run, right off the route. No sorting 
or picking, we pay freight from anywhere 
in U.S.A. Stonding order available for reg- 
ular shippers. JALEN AMUSEMENT CO 
1215 S. HOWARD STREET-— BALTIMORE, 
MD. 21230. 

RECORDS, 45'i AND LP's SURPLUS R^E- 
tumt, overstock cut-outs, etc. HARRY 
WARfelNER KNICKERBOCKER MUSIC CO. 
— 453 McLEAN AVE., YONKERS, N.Y. (Tel. 
GReenleaf. 6-7778). 

NEW 45 RPM RECORDS. NO QUANTITY TOO 
large or small. We pay the highest price, 
plus all freight. Also over-run return hit 
records. Coritact immediately for quick 
tronsactlon. We pay cosh. SUTTON RECORD 
CO. — 26 West 20th ST. — New York, N.Y. 
(Tel. CH 2 -3250). 

USED 45 RPM RECORDS. WE PAY freight & 
top prices. KING SALES— 1415 WASHING- 
TON S TREET— BOSTON, MASS. 

45 RPM RECORDS, NEW. NO QUANTITY TOO 
large or smoll. Highest prices paid. Write 
stating quantity on bond. TONY GALGANO 
DIST. CO.,,^ 4135 W. ARMITAGE, CHICAGO 
39, ILL (Tel. Dickens 2-7060). 


WANT MIDWAY RED BALL IF YOU HAVE 
one or fifty w# con use them. (Unshopped). 
We pay cosh. AMERICAN MUSIC CO., 219 
—1st AVE. SOUTH, GREAT FALLS, MON- 
TANA. PHONE 452-7301 or 454-1100. 


WANT: RECORDS, 45's, USED OR NEW. ALSO 
LP stocks, ony quantity. Will buy on steady 
b«ls. BEACON RECORD DISTRIBUTOR^ 
725 BRANCH AVENUE, PROVIDENCE, R.l. 
02904. PHONE: UN-1-7500 or JA-1-5121. 


WE WANT TO BUY: WILLIAMS CRAN^, 
Chicogo-Coin Steam Shovels. Co'h. TRl 
STATE trading CO., BOX 272. MILES 
CITY, MONTANA. 


RECORD COMPANIES— WANT ACTION Dis- 
tribution & Promotion. Send your latest re- 
ieoses to us, we'll do the rest! JODY REC- 
ORD DISTRIBUTING CO. 2226 MC DON- 
ALD AVE., BROOKLYN, N.Y. ES30202. 


WE WANT SIX-CARD MACHINES: LOTTA 
Fun, Barrel-O-Fun, Shoot-A-Line, Lite-A- 
Line, Venus. AMERICAN MUSIC MACHINE 
VENDING, 57 S. PENN, YORK, PA. PHONE: 
843-6201. 


WANT TO BUY USED AND NEW PINBALL 
GAMES ADDABALL one & two players every 
kind of models MFD 1964, 1965, 1966 and 
also guns, bowlers, arcade, make offer to 
Roberto Mauro, ELECTROPHON, VIA MEL- 
CHIORRE GIOIA 41a, MILANO (ITALY). 


WANTED: DAVAL FREE PLAY COUNTER 
Games, also 14 Counter Daval, Spark, Mer- 
cury, Ginger. Cig. machines in good condi- 
tion. Please state best cash price ond 
number you have to ship or pick up. CEN- 
TRAL MUSIC CO., 407 EAST AVE. D, P. 0. 
BOX 284, KILLEEN, TEXAS. 


WANTED— BOWL-A-RAMAS, PARTS & EX- 
TENSlOt'lS; A.M.i. models l-J-K-200 selection, 
mechanicoi and electrical; PONY EXPRESS 
GUNS 8* PLAYLAND GUNS; AUTO PHOTOS 
#12; ALL TYPES OF ADD-A-BALLS. 
Ctr'/ELA.NO COIN INTERNATIONAL, 2029 
Pwspici, Cleveland, Ohio, Tel. 216-861-671 5. 


WAbm SERVICEMA.N FOR SEEBURGS, POOL 
tobte and pins. Write Louco Amusements 
Ceeinfvsn- 2514 Atlantic Ave., Atlantic 
City, N.J, 08401 


PENNSYLVANIA OPERATORS 
c".. L-. ra Funs, Barrels Of Funs, Shoot 

..ite A Lines, Venus's, El Ranchos, 
■ cm, And Up Rights. Will Pick Up. 
L. A p, MUSIC, 27 E. PHILADELPHIA 
irpsrr. YORK, PA. PHONE 848-1846. 
PHL. DASfE. 


WANTED— YOUR USED 45 RPM RECORDS. 
We pay freight and up to 13*. REC-O-RAC 
942 DEODAR. ESCONDIDO, CALIFORNIA. 
(TEL. 714-745-5942). 


WANT— BASEBALLS, POOL TABLES, SHUF- 
fleboard Scoring Units, Shuffleboards with 
anti-cheats. Guns, Bear Guns, Coon Hunts, 
Arcade Equipment, Personal Music. Write 
stating make, model, condition and best 
cash price. ST. THOMAS COIN SALES, 669 
TALBOT ST., ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO, CAN- 
ADA. Areo 519-631-9550. 


SELL YOUR SURPLUS 45'S TO THE NATION'S 
largest user. We are the nation's foremost 
packager of promotionally priced record 
packs. We purchase unlimited quantities on 
o steady basis. Wire — phone for quick deol. 
NATIONAL BAG-O-TUNES, P.O. BOX 569, 
1217-19-21 SIMPSON AVENUE, OCEAN 
CITY, NEW JERSEY 08226. 


WANT: TWO TOP NOTCH SERVICEMEN FOR 
route work on bingos and jukeboxes. These 
openings are due to expansion. Good work- 
ing conditions with well established company. 
This job is permanent and salary to com- 
mensurate with ability. Cole Henry, Star 
Amusement Co., 136 State Street, West 
Columbio, South Carolina. Tel.: 256-1429. 


WANT; NEW OR USED 45 RPM SINGLE NOT 
over 6 months old. We pay 1 1 4 each ond 
the freight and we can use 200 of one 
number. Phone: 312-344-3300. CHAS. 
ALZNER, 508 Washington Blvd., Maywood, 
llinois. 


WANTED — 10 WILLIAMS 4-PLAYER MARDI 
Gras. Write or coll Heath Soles Company, 
655 Second Street, Macon, Georgia. 


GERMAN FOOSBALLS, FORRESTER ONL'iL 
New or if used, describe condition. BUDGE 
WRIGHT'S WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 1226 
SW 16th AVE., PORTLAND, OREGON. 


DESIRE DISTRIBUTOR OR LARGE RECORD RE- 
toiler from Montreal or Toronto to purchase 
Canadian-mode hi-line LP's. All cream and 
chart music. Unlimited supply — stereo or 
mono. $1 .85 each. Strict confidence, cosh 
only. Write to Box 770 c/o Cosh Box, 1780 
B'way, N.Y. N.Y. 10019. 


WANTED TO BUY: ROCK-OLA 1558 (160 
Selection) Wall Boxes. Write or call Bird 
Music Distributors, Inc., 124-126 Poyntz 
Avenue, Monhotton, Kansos. Area Code 
913-Prescott 8-5229. 


FOR SALE 


ADD-A-BALLS — Wing Ding $225; Swing Time 
$150; Vagobond $125; Bowl-A-Strike $350; 
Polooka $75; Flipper $75; Flipper Parade 
$75; Square Head $150; Flipper Clown 
$100. Completely shopped — Ready for lo- 
cotion. Sutherland Distributing Compony, 
705 N.W. 4th, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
Phone (405) CE 6-3691. 


"ATTENTION OPERATORS, DISTRIBUTORS — 
New, proven. Personal Stereo-Coin Minute- 
Music Systems moke twice the money, cost 
only holf as much as ordinary Juke-Box. 
Locations easier. Servicing No Problem. 
Personal Music. Kirk International Music 
Division, PO Box 7633-Orlando, Florida." 


WM's WORLD SERIES $275.00. CHICO TRI- 
umph shuffle $395.00. Wurl. 5210 w/b's 
$29.50. Seeb. OWI's $14.00. Cent. Corsair 
30 col. cig. $200.00. Gott. Texan 4 pi. FP 
$150.00. Captl. Drive in sound Movie Cor 
$100.00. GRECO BROS. AMUSEMENT CO., 
1288 B'WAY, ALBANY, N.Y. PHONE: 
HO-5-0228. 


UPRIGHTS, BINGOS, ONE-BALLS: TWIN 
WILD CAT, TWIN RED ARROW, TWIN 
TIM BUC TOO. All Bingos— ALL BINGOS — 
TURF KINGS, ONE BALLS AND CLAW 
MACHINES. NEW ALL ELECTRIC HOPPER 
PAYOUT FRUIT (SLOT) MACHINES. Write: 
CROSS-DUNHAM & CO., 255 Wright Ave. 
"F", Greotno, La. Tel 367-4365. 


ACE LOCKS KEYED ALIKE. SEND LOCKS AND 
the key you want them mastered to. $1.00 
each less 10% lots of 50 or more. RANDEL 
LOCK SERVICE, 61 ROCKAWAY AVENUE, 
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. 1 1580. TEL: 516- 
VA5-6216. Our 35th year in vending. 


ATTENTION OPS! GET LOWDOWN PRICES 
on all billiard supplies coin machine ports, 
accessories, etc. DIAMOND COIN MACHINE 
EXCHANGE, 609 WOODIS AVE., NORFOLK, 
VIRGINIA. (Tel. 625-1716). 


WE HAVE A CHOICE SELECTION OF LATE 
Williams Two Players. Write for prices MID- 
WEST DIST,, 709 LINWOOD BLVD.— KAN- 
SAS CITY, MO. 


POKERINO, RECONDITIONED, REFINISHED 
in Blond Birch, with new drop enute, points, 
sockets, wire, knock off, trim, bock-glass, 
ploytield decals. Write tor details. New 
socket and point drop board wired tor your 
games. JAMES TRAVIS — P.O. BOX 206 
MILLVILLE, N.J. 08332 


FOR SALE; COMPLETELY RECONDITIONED— 
2410-$375.00; 2400-$395.00; 251 0-$445.00; 
2500-$495.00; 2600-$545.00; 2700-$625.00; 
2800-$695.00. Northwest Sales Co. of Ore- 
gon, 1040 S. W. 2nd. Ave., Portland, 
Oregon 97204. Phone 503-228-6557. 


FIVE-BALL GAMES, CLEAN, READY FOR Lo- 
cation. Gott. Preview 2 PI. $150.00, Gott. 
Texan 4 PI. $95.00, Gott. Aloha 2 PI. 
$150.00, Gott. Lancer 2 PI., $150.00, 
Williams Music Man 4 PI. $75.00, Williams 
Valiant 2 PI. $135.00. Terms 1/3 deposit, 
bol. sight draft C.O.D. TRI-STATE DIS- 
TRIBUTING COMPANY, P.O. BOX 615, 
CALLIER SPRINGS ROAD, ROME, GEORGIA. 
PHONE; 404-234-7123. 


FOR SALE— DOWNEY-JOHNSON COIN COUN- 
ter with 1-5-10-25-50 cent coin tubes.... 
Slick Chick Tropic Isle . . . Want — Seeburq 
201 DH phono. NOBRO NOVELTY CO., 142 
DORE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., 
PH. 415 621-5438 


IF IT'S PANORAM PARTS YOU WANT 
PHIL GOULD HAS 'EM. ALL TYPES OF 
FILMS FOR Panorom Peeks. PHIL GOULD 
—224 market ST.— NEWARK, N.J. (Tel 
201-MArkef 4-3297). 


WE HAVE A LARGE SELECTION OF USED 
pingomes, bowlers, arcade equipment, verid- 
ing and phonographs. Direct overseas ship- 
ment from Port of Detroit. MARTIN AND 
SNYDER COMPANY, 13200 W. WARREN 
DEARBORN,. MICHIGAN 48126 PHONE 
LU 2-2300. 


FOR SALE — WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE 
of coin counters, (new or used) coin sorters, 
coin changers, coin wrappers, parts and 
supplies. Globe Distributing Co., Inc., 233C 
N Western Ave., Chicago 47, III. AR 
6-0780. 


NEW — WHOLESALE PRICES TO OPERATORS 
purchasing new coin operated "Kindertainer" 
amusement rides for leosing or resale. 
United Tool & Engineering Co. mfr., 9970 
Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, Ohio 45215. 
Phone 513-771-3790. 


SOUTHLAND ENGINEERING'S NEW IMPROVED 
model "Time Trials" in original cartons 
$495. IMPERIAL COIN MACHINE EX- 
CHANGE INC. — 498 ANDERSON AVENUE. 
ri icccinc papic N I 


SEEBURG: LPC-1 $825.00, LPC-480 $925.00, 
222HR $450.00, HFIOOR restyled $275.00, 
lOOJ $295.00. Shopped and painted, ready 
for location. WILLIAMS: All 1966, Eight 
Ball $450.00, Full House $350.00, Pitch 
& Bat baseball $525.00. Call or write. 
Operators Sales, Inc., 4122 Washington Ave., 

s. ■ ^ I t 


FOR SALE: BALLY SPECIALS BOUNTYS $495; 
Silver Sails $450; Golden Gates $450; Lidos 
$395; Roller Derbys $350: Border Beautys 
and up, write. Cleaned & Shopped. Call 
Nastasi Distributing Company, 826 Beronne 
Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70113, 
Phones (523-6386) (523-1471) .... NOW! 


FOR SALE— RELAXALATORS: JUST OFF Lo- 
cation, almost like 

MIKE MUNVES CORP., 577 10 AVE., NEW 
YORK NY 10036. 


FOR SALE: TEN 22-COLUMN NATIONAL CIO 
arette Vendors. Clean and completa, 
$265.00 ea. Write, Wire or call. First Coma, 

First served. Money Order d^oMt rec^lred. 

R F JONES CO 375 SOUTH 2ND WEST, 
SALT l5kE city, UTAH. (AREA 801). 359- 


FOR SALE: 25 ASSORTED N^ 

$15.00. Our Choice Guoronteed New 33 l/J 
RPM LP Albums — Mailed Insured— Post- 
paid — Limited Sale Offer Good Only in 
USA. Send Check or Money Or(^r--No 
COD'S. UNCLE JIM O'NEAL— BOX A— 
ARCADIA, CALIF. 91006. 


OLDIES CATALOGUE — 45 PAGES — 2,000 
titles with dotes — A must for dealers, dee- 
jays, distributors. Somple, 

$100. RECORD rendezvous, 1004 PACI- 
FIC AVENUE, ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JER- 
SEY 08401. 


FOR SALE: SLOT MACH. ROUTE, LAS VEGAS, 

Nevada. All gobbling licenses inc^d^. Or 
will consider partner. BARRE^ COIN MACH. 
CO., 2329 ALTA DR., LAS VEGAS, NEVADA. 


FOR SALE: COMPLETELY RECONDI^TIONED: 
Wurlitzer 2800-7 $595; 2810-3 $545, 

Rock-Ola 1478 $245; 414 $445; AMI J120E 
$195; Bally Mad World $245; ^Id Rush 
$345; United Line-Up Shuffle $95,- Sure 
Fire Shuffle $95. MICKEY ANDERSON 
AMUSEMENT CO., 314 EAST IITH STREET, 
ERIE, PA. PHONE: 452-3207. 


for SALE: CLEAN GAMES READY TO OPER- 
ote. Soccer $175, Bowling 
Bank-A-Ball $325, Full Hou^ $350, Swing- 
A-Long $175, Flying Circus $125, Beat The 
Clock $175. World Foir $’75 Goucho $200 
Liberty Belf 150, Tom Tom $1 50, Skill Pool 
$150, North Star $275, Sky Line $275. 
Write or coll D. & P. MUSIC, 27 PFIl^" 
DELPHIA ST., YORK, PA. PHONE: 848-1846 

FOR SALE; BALLY 2NL $225.; GRAND TOUR 
$195., Gottlieb: Slick Chick $115., Corral 
$110., Preview $250., Flipper Foir $j0p., 
Keeney: Arrowhead $250., Wms Major 
League Boseball $250., Midway 
ing Gallery $250., Arizono Gun $250. D & 
L Coin Machine Co., 414 Kelker St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. Phone: 234-1051. 


FOR SALE — PRICE REDUCED — PHONE; — 
Wurlitzer 3010 — 2910 — 2810 — ^10, 
Chicago Coin Supersonic; Knowledge Com- 
puter; NEW Chicago Coin Par Golf. REDD 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, INC., 672 Mom 
Street, Hyonnis, Massachusetts 02601 Tel. 


FOR SALE; MAYFAIR $385.00; A GO GO 
$525.00; Pretty Baby $275.00; Six Sticks 
$425.00; Fun Cruise $340.00; Gold Rush 
$290.00; Kicker $310.00; Little League 
$300.00. Also Beach Beauty, Border Beauty, 
Silver Sails, Golden Gate, Con Con, Lido 
and others. New Orleans Novelty Company, 
1055 Dryodes Street, New Orleans, Lo. 
70113 529-7321, Coble: NONOVCO. 


FOR SALE. UNITED SHUFFLES; CREST $275; 
Ultra $295; Mambo $495. MOHAWK SKILL 
GAMES CO., 67 SWAGGERTOWN ROAD, 
SCOTIA, N.Y. 12302. 


M ISC. 


HI-SPEED, SUPER FAST SHUFFLE BOARD WAX. 
24 one-pound cans per case. $8.50 f.o.b. 
Dallas, Texas. Sold on money bock guaran- 
tee Distributor for D. Gottlieb, ChiCoin. 
STATE MUSIC DISTRIBUTORS INC., 3100 
MAIN ST., DALLAS, TEXAS. 


FOR SALE: JENNINGS AND MILLS FRUIT 
machines slot machines for export. Also 
complete stock of fruit machine ports. Call 
or write Nevada Fruit (Slot) Machine Co., 
P.O. Box 5734, Reno, Nevado. 


RECORD BONANZA 45'S, BRAND NEW. Ex- 
cellent assortment, late hits, oldies, DJ's 
$6.60 per hundred; $56 per thousand, post 
paid. J.M.B. RECORDS, P.O. BOX 2902, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19126 (215) WA 

7-0253. 


BEAR GUN, NOT QUITE COMPLETE $39.50. 
Please Write Budge Wright's Western Dis- 
tributors, 1226 SW 16th Ave., Portland, 
Oregon. 


NEW FOR DEEJAYS! SIX VOLUME LIBRARY 
of 6,000 riotous classified one-liners, $5.00 
Copy of comedy monthly free with order! 
"Comedy Spectacular", giant lough sampler 
of one-liners, breaks, etc., $2.00, Catalog 
free. EDWARD ORRIN, 8034 GENTRY, NO 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 91605. 


30,000 PROFESSIONAL COMEDY LINES! 
Largest laugh library in show business. 
ForW books of classified moterial, plus Or- 
ben's Current Comedy the newsmaking 
topical gog service featuring hip dee- 
jay lines in each issue. Great somple 
selection, $5.00. Catalog free. ORBEN 
DEEJAY LAUGHS, 3536 Daniel Crescent. 
Baldwin Harbor, N.Y. 11510 


WANTED: DEALERS FOR INSTANT CAMPER 
Stotion Mgrs. announcers we will pay up to 
$5.00 per response. Instant Campers Cus- 
tom built to fit most Vehicles. Write IN- 
STANT CAMPER, 2145 HOLLYWOOD WAY, 
BURBANK, CALIFORNIA. 


62 


Cash Box — December 31, 1966 



And Now A Word To All Contented Cats . . . . 


Purrrrrrr. 


It’s a good feeling to have, contentment. Business going strong, sales steady 
or climbing, fewer service calls, satisfied customers, new markets opening. . . . 

It’s also good to have a friend, someone who knows and cares about coin ma- 
chines, the industry, and its people. 


That’s where Cash Box comes in. Rain or Shine. 

So the next time you feel in need of a friend, call us. 
We’ll be home. 





In Gash Box • • 





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